Feb 26, 2024  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

History

  
  • HIST 216 - History of Modern Japan


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the history of modern Japan, from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. Major themes and events include Japan’s development as a nation-state, its colonial empire, the Asia-Pacific War, and its “miraculous” postwar recovery and growth. Although the course ostensibly surveys the history of a single nation and society, the emphasis will be on how this history relates to broader socio-economic and political phenomena throughout the world. Offered alternate years. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
  • HIST 217 - Making of Modern China


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides a survey introduction to the history of modern China from the Qing dynasty in the nineteenth century through China’s tumultuous twentieth century. Major themes include: the Opium War; the 1911 Revolution; China’s exploration of different systems of government like republicanism, militarism, nationalism, and socialism; intraregional cooperation and conflict; the battle between the Nationalists and the Communists; and urban-rural social divides. The latter part of the course will focus on the post-1949 era marked by state socialism and events such as the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and Tiananmen Square.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspectives.
  
  • HIST 232 - The Holocaust


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the rise of Adolf Hitler and Nazism, the persecution of Jews and others in the Third Reich, and the ultimate extermination of the Jews of Europe, Gypsies, political enemies, and others deemed undesirable by the Nazi dictatorship of Europe during the Second World War.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
  • HIST 233 - WWII:Global & Social Issues


    4 credit(s)
    This class will analyze the origins and impact of the Second World War. We will begin in 1918 by looking at the Treaty of Versailles that ended the Great War, trace the rise of Mussolini and Hitler, examine the world-wide economic crisis in the 1930s, and isolationism in America. We will also investigate American life during the war, Japanese internment and negative portrayals of Japanese in US propaganda, the Holocaust, atomic warfare, the plight of gay and black soldiers, and the postwar world that led to American global power as well as a new Cold War with the Soviet Union.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and Diverse Perspectives.
  
  • HIST 234 - The Trial of Galileo


    2 credit(s)
    The Trial of Galileo shows the confrontation between Copernicanism, as brilliantly propounded by Galileo, and the elegant cosmology of Aristotle, as defended energetically by conservatives within the Inquisition. The issues range from the nature of faith and the meaning of the Bible to the scientific principles and methods as advanced by Copernicus, Kepler, Tycho Brahe, Giordano Bruno, and Galileo. The course is organized as a role-playing game with each student adhering to individual game objectives with written and oral assignments specific to each role.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
  • HIST 235 - Europe Since World War II


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines the history of Europe and its relation to the world at large from the close of World War II to the current examining questions of the continent’s future in the global community. Since 1945, Europe has struggled to redefine itself in the context of the war’s problematic legacy, the cold war’s competing ideologies, nationalist struggles of independence, discrepancies of affluence and poverty, and the difficulties of global market competition. It is a process that continues today as the continent moves slowly toward economic and political integration.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
  • HIST 239 - Latin America I: Conquest-Independence


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of Latin American history from 200 C.E. to 1810 C.E. with a focus on the pre-Columbian Mayan, Aztec, and Inca civilizations; the conquest and settlement of Mexico, Central America, and South America by the Spanish and Portuguese; and the colonial institutions in Spanish America and Brazil up to the beginnings of the movements toward independence. Special emphasis will be given to the clash of indigenous and European religious/spiritual outlooks, political economy, and the interaction of issues of race, class, and gender in the emergence of syncretic New World societies. Also listed as POLS 239 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
  • HIST 241 - Latin America II: Independence-Present


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of Latin American history from 1810 to the present with a focus on the independence struggles and the first century of independence; the rise of populism, socialism, and economic nationalism; the collapse of populist democracies and the rise of bureaucratic authoritarian military regimes; and recent transitions to democracy combined with economic liberalization. Course will also include attention to issues of class, race and gender, over the course of these political and economic transformations and the history of US-Latin American relations in the 19th and 20th century. Meets comparative cultural core requirement.
  
  • HIST 245 - African American History Since 1865


    4 credit(s)
    A history of African American politics, culture, and thought since the end of the Civil War.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and Diverse Perspectives.
  
  
  • HIST 256 - Leaders & Leadership


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an overview of leaders and leadership from ancient times to the modern era. We will assess how the historical context as well as notions of gender, race, sexuality, and class have shaped convictions about effective leadership. Reading texts from Herodotus, the Bible, Saint Augustine, Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and theories put forth in contemporary leadership studies, we will analyze the use of rhetoric, political skills, emotional intelligence, passion, team work, decision-making, conflict resolution, and grit that has propelled leaders in the fields of politics, business, the military, social movements, and religion. We will investigate the characteristics deemed necessary in a leader, various leadership styles (situational, autocratic, facilitative, cross-cultural, servant, transformational), the tension between effectiveness and ethics, and the emerging fields of thought leaders and “influencers.”
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
  • HIST 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
  • HIST 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HIST 313 - World War II in History & Memory


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines the changes in public memory of World War II in different countries in Asia, Europe, and North America from the immediate aftermath of the war to the present. It pays particular attention to the heightened interest in the war in recent decades and the intersections between memory and history played out in various media forms.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), HIST 232 , or HIST 235 .
  
  • HIST 318 - The Business of Capitalism in East Asia


    4 credit(s)
    In the past sixty-odd years, Japan, South Korea, Hong Kong, Singapore, Taiwan, and, most recently, China, have all become leading economic powers in the world. How did this happen? Why did it happen? Is there such a thing as an “East Asian Business Model”? This course is a comparative history of how capitalism developed in East Asia, with a particular focus on the post-World War Two era. Topics will include the role of science and technology, the interwar economy, the so-called East Asian Model of development, the “Japanese miracle,” the rise of “Market Socialism” in China, the Japanese “bubble economy,” and the role of “traditional” Asian cultures and heritages.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 319 - Rise and Fall of the Japanese Empire


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines imperialism in East Asia in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It explores colonial ideologies and structures of rule of Western imperialist powers compared to that of Japan. Major topics include Pan-Asianism, anti-colonial nationalism, wartime mobilization, life under colonial rule, and the postcolonial legacy of Japan’s empire.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspective.
  
  • HIST 333 - History of the British Empire


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines the history of modern British Empire from the nineteenth century race for empire to the post-colonial world. Using the lens of the British Empire, the largest of all European empires, the course examines the political and economic impulses for imperialism, the nature of various imperial systems, the impact of imperialism on both the colonizer and the colonized, the turmoil of national independence and decolonization, and the lasting legacies of imperialism in the post-colonial world.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) or HIST 103  or HIST 104  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
  • HIST 335 - The Era of the First World War


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the historical period of the First World War in Europe. It focuses on the causes, course and effects of the war within a European perspective in terms of the political, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. It is designed to consider the impact of WWI on European society as the formative event of the 20th century
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 338 - Era of the French Revolution


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the historical period of the French Revolution from the Enlightenment through the defeat of Napoleon. It focuses on the causes, course and effects of the Revolution in terms of the political, social, cultural and intellectual contexts. It is designed to consider the impact of the French Revolution as the defining moment of the modern period.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  
  • HIST 363W - Cold War America


    4 credit(s)
    A research seminar on the key developments in American foreign policy and domestic life from the Yalta Summit to the Gulf of Tonkin resolution.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) or HIST 142 .
  
  • HIST 365 - Civil Rights Movements


    4 credit(s)
    This course investigates the origins, major goals, and strategies of civil rights movements in the modern era, including Native American, women, LGBTQIA+, African American, disability and others. As a final project, students will conduct research on the movement of their selection. Previously Listed As: HIST 465
  
  • HIST 369 - Get Rich! Wealth in American History


    4 credit(s)
    An analysis of attitudes toward wealth from the Puritans to the present. The history of capitalism, labor, and poverty, and the role of gender and race in shaping views will also be addressed.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 370 - Crime, Corruption, & Scandal


    4 credit(s)
    Using newspapers, speeches, sensational public trials, fiction, film, and scholarship this class will trace shifting concerns about crime and corruption from the Salem Witch trials through Jackson’s “Corrupt Bargain,” Indian wars, the lawless “Wild West,” as well as the Robber Barons of the Gilded Age. We will analyze how reform efforts from the Progressive era until today reflect convictions about human nature, gender, race, sexuality, class, and age. Primary topics include historical patterns of violence, the role and organization of the police, origins of the 2008 economic crash, and the National Security Agency’s unchecked surveillance of private citizens.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 380W - Historical Thinking


    2 credit(s)
    The history of historical thinking helps students consider more deeply the relationship between source material, interpretation, and the production of historical knowledge and how that has changed over time, from the ancient world to the twenty-first century.  This course addresses:  the nature and functions of historical inquiry; the topics open to historical examination; the pursuit of sources; the types of questions historians ask of their sources, themselves, and other historians; the manner in which schools of historical thought develop and shape our inquiries; the process of research; and the construction of coherent historical arguments.
    Offered: Fall

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180  and Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 381 - Historical Research


    2 credit(s)
    Historical Research examines how one goes about ‘doing’ history, particularly in a digital age.  This will be a kind of ‘how to’ for the mechanics of historical research and interpretation helping students to identify, locate, research, analyze and interpret historical source material, both secondary and primary, in part by understanding how libraries, archives, and online databases function and operate.  Thus, students will develop information literacy related to researching primary and secondary materials by conducting basic historical research through the effective use of libraries, archives, and online databases.
    Prerequisite(s): HIST 380W 
  
  • HIST 391W - Research Methods in History


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to research methods for students in history and the humanities. It examines the principles of research design, methodology, and the analytic and theoretical frameworks of interpretation used by historians. In conjunction, it will study how historical methodology and patterns of interpretation have changed over time. It introduces students to the fundamentals of primary and secondary research conducted both in libraries and archives. It is required of all History majors.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HIST 400 - Medieval Women


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a seminar on the attitudes towards, roles, work, and responsibilities of women in the period from the first century to the fifteenth century. Women in their roles as nuns, witches, prostitutes, brewers, mothers, queens, and consorts are discussed. The course is thematic rather than chronological, and investigates anthropological, feminist, and political theories and paradigms associated with the study of women generally. Assigned reading consists of primary sources, secondary monographs, and journals. Also listed as GSS 400 .
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  • HIST 413 - History of Modern Drugs and Medicines


    4 credit(s)
    This interdisciplinary and interregional course explores drugs and medicines as commodities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The first part of the course traces the commodity chain of well-known substances like opium, quinine, and cocaine – from production to distribution to consumption – in order to examine how drugs and medicines have influenced geopolitics, shaped social relations, and influenced peoples’ habits across the globe. The second part of the course involves applying concepts and ideas learned from part one to specific case studies around the world. The overall goal is to have students think and write critically about the role of drugs and medicines in relation to the larger questions concerning capitalism, colonialism, and modernity. How do different societies determine the difference between a drug versus a medicine?
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Perspectives.
  
  • HIST 439 - World War II


    4 credit(s)
    This class is designed to help students understand the origins of totalitarianism, the causes, course, and consequences of World War II, Holocaust, the Cold War, and to analyze the morality of war. Through film, monographs, and on-line archives, students will assess the wide-ranging impact of war on the economy, gender, sexuality, race, and creation of the post-war world.
    Offered: Offered biennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): HIST 104 , HIST 142 , or HIST 232 .
  
  • HIST 441W - Environmental History


    4 credit(s)
    This course focuses on historical scholarship that has addressed the changing relationship between human societies and “nature”. The course explores the development of ecological science and environmental politics; it also explores the ways in which Americans of European and indigenous background imposed their understandings on the landscape, and the consequences of these impositions. Other subjects include National Park Service policy, game conservation and class conflict, and the development of governmental agencies dedicated to protecting or controlling the environment. Also listed as ENV 441W .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Sustainability and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
  
  • HIST 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
  • HIST 491 - Independent Research I


    1 credit(s)
    This is student-conducted individual research leading to a senior thesis. It is required of all History majors.
    Offered: Offered Fall semester.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed credits) and declared History major.
    Corequisite(s): HIST 333  or HIST 365  
  
  • HIST 492 - Independent Research II


    1 credit(s)
    Serves as the senior capstone project and is required of History majors.
    Offered: Offered Spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): HIST 491 .

Humanities

  
  • HUM 100 - Origins, Identity & Meaning


    4 credit(s)
    A required seminar for first-semester first-year students that introduces students to college academic life and the skills needed for success in that life. It is a humanities-based course in its content, intended to engage students in the task of personal and cultural critique, and designed to provide a common learning experience for the entire first-year class. Students will also experience the educational advantages of having a diversity of teaching methods and approaches both within and among various sections of the seminar; although cross-sectional themes, texts, and events may be adopted by current HUM 100 faculty, the course will be designed and taught in a manner thought most appropriate by the individual instructor. Fall semester. Does not meet Humanities core requirement.
  
  • HUM 101 - Global Exploration FYS Travel


    2 credit(s)
    The Global Explorations FYS Travel course is part of the Global Scholars pathway. The course is open to participants in Global Scholars FYS, which serves as preparation for this short-term travel or online international experience. Open to other students by instructor consent. Students will engage in place-based experiential learning related to the topic of the Global Scholars FYS section. Instructor’s consent required.
    Offered: Offered in Winter

  
  • HUM 155 - New Topics


    1 credit(s)
    Click here for the topic description or see the Advising Center.
  
  • HUM 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HUM 200 - Material Science for Makers


    2 credit(s)
    Through the lens of cultural values, this interdisciplinary course introduces students to relationships between art, craft, design, and science as applied to processes and materials used for the production of functional objects such as tools, tableware, and clothing. Throughout history, scientific and empirical approaches have been used outside of the laboratory by artisans and craftspeople to improve our food, tools, and shelters for the benefit of our health and well-being. In this course, students will use the scientific method in their work as they explore how science and culture inform and influence our choices and treatment of physical materials used to make the things we need. We will evaluate these choices for their utility and investigate the materials and processes of making using the scientific frameworks of physics and chemistry. We will also assess methods of production while considering issues of sustainability and environmental stewardship. Using Japanese culture as a unifying thread through lecture, reading, written reflection, and hand’s on making, students will explore attitudes towards consumption and the science behind the processes of making objects of use in indigenous, traditional, and industrial cultures. Through the course of the semester, students will complete a simple sheath knife, a raku tea bowl, and a shibori-dyed article of clothing. The course will be team taught by faculty from both the School of Natural Sciences and the School of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): SCI 200 .
  
  • HUM 201 - Global Scholars Seminar


    2 credit(s)
    The Global Scholars Seminaris a required course for students enrolled in the Global Scholars Program. Students will be guided to plan their path through the program by reflecting on discoveries made in the program and other coursework or lived experiences. Instructor’s consent required.
    Offered: Offered in Fall

  
  • HUM 204 - Chinese Cultural Study


    4 credit(s)
    This course offers students a general introduction to Chinese culture as a chance to improve their knowledge and understanding of Chinese people. Culture is understood as shared ideas and meanings which a people use to interpret the world and on which to pattern their behaviors. This concept of culture includes an understanding of the history, the land, thought and religion, literature and art, music and dance, food and clothing, architecture and housing, family and gender, and holiday and leisure activities. In addition to meeting as a class to discuss and present readings on Chinese culture and customs, hands on activities such as cooking Chinese food, practicing martial arts and calligraphy, as well as field trips to the Chinese Garden in downtown Portland will be important parts of the course. Students will also conduct interviews with people from China to explore their lifestyles and ways of thinking. Taught in English.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
  • HUM 207 - German Film in English


    4 credit(s)
    A general introduction to the film of people in the German-speaking countries, focusing on the time period from the early 20th century to the present. Special emphasis on the intersection of culture with historical, social, and political events.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
  • HUM 211 - Preparation for Travel in India


    2 credit(s)
    This is a course that will prepare students for Travel in India: Gender, Culture and Service, a Winter III course sponsored by the Center for Gender Equity. This course will provide students with the information necessary to help them get the most of their WIII experience. The content will cover the basic history, religion, culture, geography, and politics of India. Also listed as GSS 211 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
  • HUM 213 - Introduction to Japanese Literature


    4 credit(s)
    This class is a survey course and will provide an introduction to Japanese literature from the earliest period to the modern era (Meiji Period). We are going to read translations of poetry and of passages from myths, plays, and novels - all in chronological order. Through reading texts in various literary styles, we will not only become familiar with cultural, historical, and social issues discussed in Japan, but more importantly, gain a skill to express our thoughts, perspectives, and beliefs in Japanese literary forms such as myths, diaries, noh, linked-poetry, haikai (haiku) and I-Novel. Understanding the unique literary styles along with their philosophical or religious background will be certainly beneficial for us to expand our worldview, learn to accommodate difference, and acknowledge humanistic issues beyond national boundaries.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
  • HUM 215 - Modernity in Japanese Narrative


    4 credit(s)
    This course will cover various thematic and stylistic expressions behind Japanese short stories and novels, and we will examine the meaning of modernity in the Japanese context. Special attention will be given to the establishment of modern Japanese literature, the rise of children’s literature and the impact of Japanese animations. During the Edo Period between the 17th and the early 19th centuries, Japan experienced the first rise of modernity in which various entertainment/art forms became popular among middle-class people - kabuki, ukiyo-zousi, and haikai. The second phase of modernity started in the late 19th century, when after the contact with the West, new literary genres such as I-novel, haiku, douwa (children’s literature) and animations were born as the result of unifying original and the Western literary and aesthetic traditions. By comparatively analyzing two phases of modernity in Japan, we will come to a further understanding of the role of popular literature in the construction of modernity.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
  • HUM 222 - Introduction to East Asian Studies


    4 credit(s)
    Provides a multidisciplinary approach to the study of East Asia. Through an examination of fiction, film, memoirs, historical documents, and scholarly writings, we will examine East Asia’s place in the modern world. We will begin with an examination of the shared cultural and philosophical foundations-i.e. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism-that make East Asia a coherent region. We will focus on the eighteenth through twenty-first centuries, and particularly how various forms of media shed light on East Asian modernity. Also listed as IS 222 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
  
  • HUM 260 - U.S. Latinas/os & Pop Culture


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the varied historical, cultural and political experiences and expressions of Latinas/os in the United States through the study of diverse cultural texts. In particular, this course examines the diverse ways in which Latinas/os articulate their identities in music, film, television, literature and performance. The class explores the histories and experiences of non-migrant Latino populations in the U.S. as well as the roots of Latina/o immigrations to the U.S. by examining texts such as formal letters in the colonial period, songs and legends from the annexation period of northern Mexico to the U.S. to film, music and performances in the twentieth and twenth first centuries. Students learn to engage critically with forms of popular culture, viewing these texts as both part of “the practice of everyday life” and as sites for the construction and negotiation of identities and national discourses.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirement: Diverse Perspectives.
  
  • HUM 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
  • HUM 295 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HUM 300 - Mentoring in the Humanities


    4 credit(s)
    Each student serves as a mentor in one section of HUM 100 , the required First-Year Seminar course. Mentors attend all HUM 100  classes and co-curricular events and complete all of the readings. They do not take exams, write papers, or participate in the evaluation of students in HUM 100 . The mentor is to act as a peer in helping first-year students make the transition from high school to college. They hold study sessions and help with note taking, writing assignments, and the development of proper study skills. They work closely with faculty in developing the means to good mentoring in their section of HUM 100 . They meet with the First-Year Seminar Coordinator one hour each week to review their work and to discuss pedagogical issues associated with teaching the humanities. Mentors are selected by an application process in the spring. Instructor’s consent required. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Offered Fall semester.

    Core Requirement(s): Does not meet Humanities core requirement.
  
  • HUM 306 - Latino Fiction


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the fiction of Latino writers representing the diverse Hispanic cultures of the U.S. with emphasis on the themes of immigration, culture adaptation, and the unique characteristics of the author’s Hispanic heritage.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

  
  • HUM 310 - Travel in India: Gender Society Service


    2 credit(s)
    Travel in India: Gender, Culture and Service is a Winter term course sponsored by the Center for Gender Equity. It consists of two and a half weeks travel in southern India during the month of January. The bulk of the course is conducted at Lady Doak College, a small liberal arts women’s college in Madurai, India in Tamilnadu. The course consists of lecture and discussion by Lady Doak faculty, service learning, discussion with local service agencies, fieldwork on a topic of the student’s choice, and travel to sites of cultural and historic importance. The participant is required to register for HUM 211  the fall semester prior to the travel portion of the class. Also listed as GSS 310 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): HUM 211   or GSS 211 
  
  • HUM 311 - Global Skills I: Prepare


    2 credit(s)
    In our globalized world, the ability to engage with cultural difference is a valuable skill. This course is designed to develop your intercultural communication skills and broaden your worldview for a smoother adaption to study abroad or other cross-cultural contexts. You’ll get the most out of your cross-cultural experience and learn to communicate in diverse social and cultural settings. “Global Skills I” is part of a 3-course program to maximize your learning experience; see IS 312 /HUM 312  and IS 313 /HUM 313 . Also listed as IS 311 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspective, Diverse Perspectives, and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
  • HUM 312 - Global Skills II: Engage


    1 credit(s)
    This is an online course to support Pacific students studying abroad or participating in a semester-long cross-cultural experience, and it is open to international students studying at Pacific. Through online discussions, experiential assignments and written re?ection, you will engage in processing your intercultural experiences while they are happening. As a result, you will adapt more effectively and deeply with your host culture. Global Skills 2 is part of a 3-course program to develop intercultural competence.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): IS 311  or HUM 311  
    Corequisite(s): Pacific University Study Abroad Program or other intercultural experience.
  
  • HUM 313 - Global Skills III: Leverage


    1 credit(s)
    In this course, you will learn how to articulate your intercultural experience as an advantage on resumes and during job interviews. Additionally, the course is designed to help you retain your intercultural communication skills, which typically fade after re-entry. The course will support you through your “reverse culture shock” and help you to transition from study-abroad or cross-cultural programs. GS 3 students may help mentor GS 1 students. Global Skills 3 is part of a 3-course program to develop intercultural competence. See descriptions for IS 311 /HUM 311  & HUM 312 . Also listed as IS 313 .  
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): IS 311  or HUM 311  AND IS 312  or HUM 312 .
  
  • HUM 351 - Traditional Theater of East Asia


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces students to traditional theater of China, Korea, and Japan. Students learn historical backgrounds of the six main theatrical art forms, examine literary and aesthetic theories, and understand the establishment and the distinctiveness of cultural identities within East Asia. In addition to learning about traditional theatrical performances, students will read innovative, contemporary plays inspired by traditional theater of East Asia. The goal is to understand the essential aspects of traditional theater that could be accessible and appreciated beyond language and culture.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
  
  • HUM 360 - Advanced Topics:U.S. Latina/o Studies


    4 credit(s)
    This course offers advanced study on topics related to the varied historical, cultural and political experiences and expressions of Latinas/os in the United States. The class examines the histories and experiences of non-migrant Latino populations in the U.S. as well as Latin American immigrants, and how these histories and experiences are constructed in diverse cultural texts. Students learn to engage critically with various cultural texts, viewing them as sites for the construction and negotiation of identities and national discourses.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): HUM 260  or Sophomore Standing (30 or more completed credits).
  
  • HUM 370 - Travel Prep: Discovery of France & Beyond


    2 credit(s)
    Come discover France or a French-speaking destination through the lens of a particular theme (ex: cuisine) or discipline (ex: theater, media arts, anthropology).  This course is preparation for a 10-14 day short-term travel course to France or a Francophone region. (HUM 371  or FREN 371  ). Destination and theme may vary with each offering. Students wishing to travel are required to take this 2-credit preparation course. Also listed as FREN 370  
    Offered: Every other year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing (30 or more completed credits).
  
  • HUM 371 - Travel: Discovery of France & Beyond


    2 credit(s)
    Come discover France or a French-speaking destination through the lens of a particular theme (ex: cuisine) or discipline (ex: theater,
    media arts, anthropology). This course is a 10-14 day short-term travel course to France or a Francophone region. Destination and
    theme may vary with each offering. Also listed as FREN 371 
    Offered: Every other year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Humanities Core, meets International Perspectives Cornerstone requirement.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 370   or HUM 370 
  
  • HUM 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HUM 400 - Mentoring in the Humanities II


    4 credit(s)
    This course is designed to promote leadership opportunities for repeat student mentors in FYS.  In addition to performing the duties described in HUM 300: Mentoring in the Humanities (see course description in the academic catalog), student responsibilities in HUM 400 may involve, but not be limited to: formally and informally sharing relevant experiences with their peers in HUM 300; promoting first-year programming such as Ask Boxer
    and First-Year, First-Served events, assisting the FYS Director in assessing FYS activities. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Fall

    Prerequisite(s): HUM 300 
  
  • HUM 401 - Global Scholars Capstone


    0 credit(s)
    The Global Scholars Capstone Portfolio is a required course for students enrolled in the Global Scholars Program. Students will be guided through the integration of their major coursework, their international experience, and the International and Diverse Perspecitves-related coursework in order to apply an International and Diverse Perspectives lens to their major capstone project. Instructor consent required.
  
  
  • HUM 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
  • HUM 495 - Research


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.

Human Biology

  
  • HBIO 110 - Human Biology


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to basic anatomy and physiology of the human organism. This course is designed for non-science majors. Laboratory is integrated with lecture. Students cannot receive for HBIO 110 and any combination of the following: BIOL 224, BIOL 240, BIOL 230, BIOL 231, HBIO 230  or HBIO 231 . Does not count toward a Biology major or minor.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
  • HBIO 230 - Human Anatomy & Physiology I


    4 credit(s)
    Human Anatomy and Physiology is a year long course that explores the structure and function of the human body in an integrated fashion. We will cover the 11 anatomical systems and understand how the structure of the human body relates to and defines its function. Emphasis will be placed on integration of systems and information flow. Human Anatomy and Physiology I introduces cytology and histology while surveying the skeletal, nervous, muscular, endocrine and reproductive systems.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200 BIOL 201 , or CHEM 220   with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): HBIO 230L .
  
  • HBIO 230L - Human Anatomy & Physiology I Lab


    Laboratory to accompany Human Anatomy & Physiology I lecture. Letter graded.
    Corequisite(s): HBIO 230 .
  
  • HBIO 231 - Human Anatomy & Physiology II


    4 credit(s)
    Human Anatomy and Physiology is a year long course that explores the structure and function of the human body in an integrated fashion. We will cover the 11 anatomical systems and understand how the structure of the human body relates to and defines its function. Emphasis will be placed on integration of systems and information flow. Human Anatomy and Physiology II emphasizes sensory physiology, circulatory, lymphatic, immune, respiratory, digestive and urinary systems.
    Prerequisite(s): HBIO 230  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): HBIO 231L .
  
  • HBIO 231L - Human Anatomy & Physiology II


    LabLaboratory to accompany Human Anatomy & Physiology II lecture. Letter graded.
    Corequisite(s): HBIO 231 .
  
  • HBIO 303 - Medical Terminology


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the language of medicine. Students will be required to learn basic elements, rules of building and analyzing medical words, and medical terms associated with the body as a whole. Previously Listed As: EXMB 303 Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  or BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  • HBIO 395 - Independent Study


    1 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  • HBIO 440 - Advanced Human Anatomy and Lab


    4 credit(s)
    Advanced study of gross and histological structure of the human body. Focus is on musculoskeletal, nervous and cardiovascular systems.
    Prerequisite(s): HBIO 231  with a minimum grade of C.

Human Performance

  
  • HPER 101 - Cardio Sculpt


    0-1 credit(s)
    Exercise emphasizing dance movements. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 102 - Step Aerobics


    0-1 credit(s)
    Step aerobics. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 104 - Circuit Training for Women


    0-1 credit(s)
    Multi-station fitness training with enrollment limited to women. Up to 8 activity may count toward the 124 required for graduation. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 105 - Fitness Walk/Jog


    0-1 credit(s)
    Exercise emphasizing locomotor activities. May be repeated for credit. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 107 - Swimming


    0-1 credit(s)
    Aquatic exercise; not for non-swimmers. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 108 - Weight Training


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic resistance training. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 109 - Tai Chi


    0-1 credit(s)
    Balance and stability exercise with an Eastern flair. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 111 - Yoga


    0-1 credit(s)
    Develops balance, flexibility, and strength. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 113 - Uplift Weight Training


    0-1 credit(s)
    The goal of this course is to provide a non-judgmental space in a fitness center for individuals who do not typically feel comfortable working out with resistance-based equipment or in gym environments. This course will cater to women, non-binary individuals, and anyone else who wishes to gain confidence. The instructor will meet individuals where they are in an effort to promote body positivity and all-around fitness. Ideally, this course will also empower participants to make their own continuing workouts once the semester concludes. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 121 - Badminton


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 123 - Golf


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and activity; off campus. Participation fee required. The fee is paid to the golf course and is for the use of golf course, rental clubs, and range balls during class times. If a student drops or withdraws from the class after some expenses have been accrued the student will be responsible for those expenses to the golf course. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 124 - Handball


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 125 - Pickleball


    0-1 credit(s)
    A tennis-like game played on a smaller indoor court. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 126 - Racquetball


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 128 - Taekwondo


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and training. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 129 - Tennis


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 130 - Ultimate Frisbee


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 131 - Volleyball


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and play. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 142 - Hula


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and performance. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 143 - Recess


    0-1 credit(s)
    Various youthful play activities as exercise. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 144 - Women’s Personal Self Defense


    0-1 credit(s)
    Basic instruction and training. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 156 - Alpine Skiing


    0-1 credit(s)
    Instruction and activity at Mt. Hood. Transportation fee (non-refundable) billed to students upon registration. Students will also pay Mt. Hood Meadows directly for the package they select. Prices for the most popular packages are listed in the course schedule; others are available. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  • HPER 157 - Outdoor Recreation


    0-1 credit(s)
    Introduces the basic concepts of outdoor recreation, as well as the types and dynamics of various outdoor recreation activities. Students will focus on the trip planning process and partake in a variety of field-based outdoor trips (e.g. rock climbing, whitewater rafting, kayaking, etc.). Participation fee required for transportation, food, permits, and campsites. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
 

Page: 1 <- Back 108 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18Forward 10 -> 29