Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Biology

  
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    BIOL 165 - Natural History Galapagos & Ecuador Prep


    2 credit(s)
    Preparation course for a January travel class to explore and study the Galapagos Islands and Ecuador - some of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. Students will study the biodiversity, adaptations, and natural history of species in Galapagos and the Andes cloud forest. Students will read introductory and popular science literature that will introduce them to the biological, ecological, and environmental issues specific to the regions that will be visited in January, and will begin to develop skills in observation and field drawing. Instructor’s Consent required.
    Offered: Offered alternate years

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
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    BIOL 166 - Natural History Galapagos/Ecuador Travel


    2 credit(s)
    Travel class to explore and study the Galapagos Islands and Ecuador - some of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. Students will study the biodiversity, adaptations, and natural history of species in Galapagos and the Andes cloud forest. During the travel course, students will apply knowledge from introductory and popular science literature to experiences with the biological, ecological, and environmental issues of the regions visited, while continuing to develop skills in observation and field drawing. This course has additional fees associated with winter term travel to Galápagos and Ecuador.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 165 .
  
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    BIOL 170 - Human Genetics


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the study of inheritance in all of its manifestations, from the distribution of human traits in a family pedigree to the biochemistry of the genetic material in our chromosomes, DNA. The course examines the inheritance of traits in individuals and families, how traits evolve and are maintained in human populations, the molecular basis for those traits, and the Human Genome Project. Does not count toward a Biology major or minor.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World; Sustainability.
  
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    BIOL 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BIOL 200 - Intro Biology: Flow of Energy


    4 credit(s)
    This course will emphasize the flow of energy in biological systems, and integrate across all levels of biological organization. Topics include: macromolecules, thermodynamics and energy, metabolism, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, homeostasis, physiology, ecology and trophic interactions, and ecosystem dynamics. Math placement into Calculus I is required to take this course in the Fall of the freshman year.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 200L .
  
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    BIOL 200L - Intro Biology: Flow of Energy Lab


    0 credit(s)
    This laboratory will examine concepts from BIOL 200  in a laboratory setting.
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 200  
  
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    BIOL 201 - Intro Biology: Flow of Information


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the flow of information in biological systems, integrating across all levels of biological organization. Topics include: animal behavior, endocrine and nervous systems, signal transduction between and within cells, and the molecular language and processes necessary for storing and transmitting biological information. Information flow between generations will be covered along with mutations, microevolution, and macroevolution. Math placement into Calculus I is required to take this course in the Fall of the freshman year.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 201L .
  
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    BIOL 201L - Intro Biology: Flow of Info Lab


    0 credit(s)
    This laboratory will examine concepts from BIOL 201  in a laboratory setting.
    Corequisite(s): BIOL 201 .
  
  
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    BIOL 275 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    BIOL 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BIOL 307 - Cancer Biology


    4 credit(s)
    An overview of the field of cancer biology with emphasis in the cellular and molecular mechanisms of tumor progression. Topic discussed include environmental carcinogens, current treatments and therapies, disease frequencies and epidemiology, drug discovery and design, and cancer prevention.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  and BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-, CHEM 220 , and CHEM 230  (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    BIOL 308 - Microbiology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the structure, biochemistry, physiology, energy generation, genetics and diversity of prokaryotic organisms. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  and BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-, CHEM 220 , and CHEM 230  (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    BIOL 313 - Molecular Biology of the Cell


    4 credit(s)
    Explores the molecular aspects of cellular biology. Topics will include molecular and cellular events in eukaryotic cells: membrane dynamics, the endomembrane system, signal transduction, regulation of the cell cycle, intracellular transport, and intercellular adhesion. An understanding of the molecular biology of a cell can be used a basis for understanding biology at the organismal, population, and ecosystem levels.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  and BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-, CHEM 220 , and CHEM 230  (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    BIOL 314 - Molecular Genetics Laboratory


    2 credit(s)
    Includes experimentation that utilizes molecular genetics techniques, such as genetic sequencing, bioinformatics, DNA extractions, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), gel electrophoresis, genetic crosses, and microscopy. The hands-on work illustrates principles presented in BIOL 312  and/or BIOL 313  lecture and teaches students elements of experimental design as well as the analysis and presentation of scientific results.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  and BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-, CHEM 220 , and CHEM 230  (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    BIOL 315 - Evolution & Biodiversity


    4 credit(s)
    Investigation of the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin and diversification of life on Earth. This course covers major concepts in evolutionary biology, including the origin of variation, mechanisms of evolutionary change, patterns of speciation and extinction, and the diversity and evolutionary relationships of living organisms.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  and BIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BIOL 317 - Genetics


    4 credit(s)
    Examines the flow of information from within and between cells, organisms, and populations over evolutionary time. Topics will include transmission genetics, molecular genetics, genomics and population genetics.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 200  andBIOL 201  with a minimum grade of C-; CHEM 220  and CHEM 230  (may be taken concurrently).
  
  
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    BIOL 360 - Selected Topics in Biology


    2-4 credit(s)
    Study of a particular field in biology selected by the instructor and approved by the Biology Department. May or may not include a lab. Some topics may require the instructor’s consent. Refer to the online course schedule to verify is instructor consent if required for the offered topic. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 , BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .  Additional prerequisites may be required depending on the topic.
  
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    BIOL 365 - Advanced National History Galapagos & Ecuador Prep


    2 credit(s)
    Preparation course for a January travel class to explore and study the Galapagos Islands and Ecuador - some of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. Students will study the biodiversity, adaptations, and natural history of species in Galapagos and the Andes cloud forest. During the fall course, students will read both original research articles and popular science literature that will advance their understanding of the biological, ecological, and environmental issues specific to the regions that will be visited in January, and will refine observational skills and develop skills in field drawing. Instructor’s Consent required.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and BIOL 315  or BIOL 317 . Instructor Consent required.
  
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    BIOL 366 - Adv Nat Hist Galapagos/Ecuador Travel


    2 credit(s)
    Travel class to explore and study the Galapagos Islands and Ecuador - some of the most biologically diverse regions in the world. Students will study the biodiversity, adaptations, and natural history of species in Galapagos and the Andes cloud forest. During the travel course, students will apply knowledge from original research articles and popular science literature to experiences with the biological, ecological, and environmental issues of the regions visited, while continuing to develop skills in observation and field drawing. This course has additional fees associated with winter term travel to Galapagos and Ecuador.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 365 .
  
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    BIOL 385 - Junior Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    The Junior Seminar is designed to introduce majors to the primary biological literature, improve their oral communication skills, and highlight recent advances in the field. Students will read, present and discuss primary research papers in the biological sciences. Topics will vary each semester but have an interdisciplinary theme.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), one upper division BIOL course (4) with a minimum grade of C- and declared Biology major.
  
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    BIOL 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BIOL 404 - Ecology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the relationships between organisms and their environment. Major topics include population dynamics, species interactions, community structure/function, and ecosystem ecology. This course introduces quantitative tools used by ecologists, and explores many applications of ecological principles to conservation and society. Weekend field trips usually part of the course. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and BIOL 315  or BIOL 317 .   
  
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    BIOL 405 - Immunology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the mammalian immune system covering the molecules and mechanisms used to fight infection. The development of B and T cells and their role in the human immune response will be emphasized. The relationship of the immune system to human biology will also be covered, for example infectious disease, vaccines, allergies, and autoimmune disorders.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 
  
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    BIOL 415 - Principles of Development


    4 credit(s)
    A study of molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying development of selected invertebrates and vertebrates, from fertilization through early organ formation. Gene regulation and experimental approaches are emphasized. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .  
  
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    BIOL 420 - Vertebrate Zoology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of vertebrate organismal biology, with an emphasis on trends in vertebrate evolution. Topics include the origin of major groups, morphology and physiology, life history, locomotion, feeding, behavior, and conservation. Includes laboratory experience. Some weekend field trips required.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .
  
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    BIOL 425 - Animal Behavior


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the ecology and evolution of animal behavior, including such topics as foraging strategies, predator-prey interactions, contests, mating systems, sexual selection, communication and the application of animal behavior to conservation. Mechanisms of animal behavior (including endocrinology, genetics and neurobiology) are also discussed. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .  
  
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    BIOL 426 - Plant Animal Interactions


    4 credit(s)
    Plant-animal interactions are fundamentally important to the ecology and evolution of natural ecosystems, to conservation (e.g., management of invasive species), and to agriculture and food production. In this class, we will study the major antagonistic and mutualistic plant-animal interactions, including pollination, herbivory, fruit and seed dispersal, and plant protection mutualisms. Using these topics, we will explore basic and applied concepts related to ecology, evolution, and plant biology. Readings from the primary literature will be an integral component of the course, while labs will focus on authentic investigations of topics such as plant defenses, associational effects, pollination biology, or seed dispersal.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .  

     

  
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    BIOL 435 - Animal Communication


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation into the biology underlying different modes of animal communication, including visual, acoustic, chemical, and tactile signaling behavior. The course will focus on the evolutionary and ecological significance of animal signals and discuss how communication is controlled by different mechanisms (endocrinology, genetics, neuroscience) and how these behaviors are impacted by anthropogenic interactions. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317  .
  
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    BIOL 444 - Evolution


    4 credit(s)
    Examines evidence for evolution and explanations for patterns of diversity and the apparent fit of organisms to the environment. Topics include the basis for evolutionary change, population level processes, natural selection, sexual selection, speciation mechanisms, and long-term macroevolutionary patterns. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .
  
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    BIOL 445 - Marine Biology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of life and processes in the marine environment. Organismal adaptations and interactions of organisms with the environment are stressed, along with field trips to the marine intertidal zones. Includes some aspects of environmental issues as they relate to biology of the ocean. Some weekend field trips required. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .
  
  
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    BIOL 466 - Genome Analysis Workshop


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the structure and function of the genome. Students will use various software tools to identify genes in a bacterial genome sequence and to study the gene products. Microbial metagenomes from environmental samples will be analyzed. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .
  
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    BIOL 470 - Animal Physiology


    4 credit(s)
    The study of physiological function (molecular, cellular, and organ systems) in animals. The focus will be on the diversity of mechanisms used by animals for: water and solute regulation, gas exchange and transport, temperature regulation and tolerance, circulation, digestion, metabolism, excretion, neural control and integration, and locomotion. Includes a laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and two of the following: BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .
  
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    BIOL 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    BIOL 489W - Advanced Research Methods


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    Teams of students carry out original research in collaboration with a member of the Biology faculty. Course involves critically reading, analyzing, and synthesizing primary literature in the research area; generating a novel data set (via experiments, studies, or data mining of large public data sets); and analyzing and interpreting the data. Research area will vary, and depends on faculty expertise.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 314 , and 2 of the following BIOL 313 BIOL 315 BIOL 317 .  8 additional upper division BIOL credits and declared Biology major. Instructor’s Consent required.
  
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    BIOL 490 - Senior Capstone Experience


    2 credit(s)
    Designed for senior Biology majors. Students will complete a capstone paper and present their capstone project publicly. The course requires that students integrate information from the primary and secondary biological literature as well as from their knowledge of biology. All topics must be approved by the Biology Department. Pass/No Pass grading only when taken for 0 credits.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, BIOL 385  or BIOL 489W  (may be taken concurrently) Must be a declared BIOL major.
  
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    BIOL 495 - Research


    1-6 credit(s)
    Faculty supervised, student-conducted, individual research project. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): BIOL 312 , BIOL 313 , and BIOL 314 .

Business, Graduate

  
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    BUS 500 - Business Immersion Program


    0 credit(s)
    The Business Immersion Program (BIP) is an overview of foundational content for the MBA program that consists of several modules in various areas within Business Administration. It is a self-paced online review with an assessment element that all admitted MBA students will complete before the start of orientation. The BIP is designed to accommodate students that have both non-business and business undergraduate degrees. The BIP concludes with lectures in each area. Pass/No Pass
  
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    BUS 502 - Financial & Managerial Accounting


    3 credit(s)
    Accounting concepts and procedures used in preparation of corporate financial statements: balance sheet, income statement, statement of cash flows. Measurement of reporting choices within Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Foundations of corporate financial statement analysis. Study use of accounting data in managing businesses by applying techniques for product costing, planning, control, and performance evaluation. Topics include: CVP analysis; variable, absorption, job, activity-based and standard costing; budgeting; responsibility accounting; capital budgeting.
  
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    BUS 503 - Economics for Managers


    3 credit(s)
    A survey of both microeconomics, the study of individual and organizational decision-making, and macroeconomics, which investigates national and international concerns. Economic theory will be complemented by practical applications and discussions of current policy issues affecting business.
  
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    BUS 505 - Org Behavior, Diversity & Leadership


    3 credit(s)
    Intensive examination of behavioral science research and theory as a basis for understanding, managing and changing organizations.The course emphasizes effective management with diverse individuals.
  
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    BUS 508 - Global Business


    3 credit(s)
    Strategies for entering new international markets and managing international operations. Discussion of cultural differences, regional economic integration, and emerging markets.
  
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    BUS 509 - Operations & Supply Chain Management


    3 credit(s)
    A managerial level examination of operations strategy with emphasis on application of quantitative models as guides to managerial decision making. Includes project management, product and service design, Just-In-Time (lean systems), mass customization, and systems thinking.
  
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    BUS 510 - Marketing Management


    3 credit(s)
    Analysis of the marketing effort and decision-making process in private, not-for-profit and public institutions. Normative models for decision-making in different marketing situations. Analytical tools available for appraising, diagnosing, organizing, planning and implementing market plans. Analysis of economic, social and political forces leading to change in the market place. Development of concepts useful in evaluating marketing situations, including those in the international setting.
  
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    BUS 511 - Financial Management


    3 credit(s)
    Introduces essential financial management concepts including time value of money, evaluation of financial performance, understanding risk and return, and primary valuation models. Using cases and computer financial models, we explore how best to evaluate investment opportunities, project analysis, raising and allocating financial capital such as equity versus debt. Students will gain an understanding of the importance of financial strategy as a critical part of a firm’s overall strategy.
  
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    BUS 514 - Special Topics


    3 credit(s)
    Elective course based on current business issues and student interest.
  
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    BUS 520 - Marketing Research & Communications


    3 credit(s)
    Introduces the study of research, data analysis and application to business and marketing challenges while combining effective communication processes for dissemination and reporting. While addressing research techniques, topics will include primary and secondary marketing research methodologies, communication strategies, case analysis, and the statistical evaluation of data sets. Students will have the opportunity to evaluate qualitative and quantitative work from existing case studies.
    Prerequisite(s): BUS 510 .
  
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    BUS 521 - Data Analytics and Decision Analysis


    3 credit(s)
    In this cousre students will learn effective strategies and methods for interpreting analytics and communicating data insights.  Students will gain an understanding of the power behind big data and its ability to create operational efficiencies, improve marketing, create opportunities for innovation, increase productivitiy as well as influence new business opportunities.
  
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    BUS 526 - International Business Travel


    1 credit(s)
    This is a short-term (approximately one week to 10 days) experiential course designed to give business students the opportunity to explore business operations overseas. The location for the international experience may vary from year to year. Additional fees required. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    BUS 527 - Applied Investment Management


    3 credit(s)
    Active management of funds allocated by numerous institutional investors. Encompasses investment policy statement (portfolio objectives, constraints, benchmarks, reports), performance evaluation/attribution, analysis (economic, industry, company), valuation, recommendations, portfolio rebalancing, trade execution, ethics of money management.
  
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    BUS 551 - Talent & Organizational Change Management


    3 credit(s)
    This course explores the interpersonal dimensions of effective managerial behavior at the individual and team level. Topics include: the new world of work, cross-cultural management, diversity, talent management, performance management, motivation, and team dynamics. Students learn to increase organizational effectiveness by better managing themselves, other individuals, teams and stakeholders of the organization. Students also learn to diagnose and analyze individual and group behavior from different theoretical perspectives, including strategic, political and cultural, and to prescribe appropriate courses of managerial action.
  
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    BUS 570 - Healthcare Laws and Regulations


    3 credit(s)
    Provides an overview of the legal and regulatory dimensions of the business of healthcare. Explores the intersections between the nature of competition in healthcare, patient rights, laws, institutional liability and the regulatory framework as well as oversight that governs the delivery of quality care. Topics include the role of changing government rules and regulations, role of compliance within healthcare, addressing medical errors, defining best practices in support of HIPAA and exploring how different countries approach common problems and challenges in providing comprehensive care.
  
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    BUS 571 - Financial Management in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    Introduces key financial management concepts including time value of money; evaluation of financial performance; understanding risk and return, and primary valuation models that apply to for-profit and not-for-profit healthcare organizations.  Uses cases and computer financial models to explore how best to evaluate investment opportunities, project analysis, raising and allocating financial capital and with an emphasis on understanding the social prerogatives of the net present value model integral to healthcare systems.
  
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    BUS 572 - Healthcare Accounting for Managers


    3 credit(s)
    Incorporates basic accounting principles and financial statement analysis as they relate to healthcare. Healthcare has many different concerns when it comes to revenue recognition due to various insurance reimbursements and Medicare restrictions. You will get a basic understanding of the challenges that managers face regarding these topics as well as other healthcare-related issues. Break-even analysis, various methods of overhead cost allocation and budgets are essential management tools that you will learn to utilize in decision making.
  
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    BUS 579 - Quality & Operations Management in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    Introduces the fundamentals of operations and supply chain management. Through case analysis and interactive projects, students explore opportunities and challenges managers face in the application of capacity management, optimization, quality management, lean systems, risk management, and analysis, as well as product and service design as it applies to healthcare organizations.  Students will gain an understanding of the importance of operations as a critical element of a firm’s overall strategy.
  
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    BUS 598 - Strategic Management


    3 credit(s)
    The application of strategic management concepts, principles and techniques through case analyses. Draws upon professional experience and concepts learned in other functional areas to develop a general management perspective and the ability to impact organizational direction and performance.

Business Administration, Undergraduate

  
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    ACCT 201 - Accounting Principles


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to accounting concepts and application of these concepts; financial statement preparation; accounting systems and controls; accounting for assets and liabilities; cash flow analysis and financial statement analysis. MS Excel is introduced and integrated into the course to solve accounting and finance problems.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    ACCT 202 - Managerial Accounting


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to management accounting concepts; cost terminology, behavior and system design; the planning and control process; using cost data in decision making.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ACCT 313 - Intermediate Accounting I


    4 credit(s)
    Financial accounting statement interpretation, presentation, and disclosure including coverage of functions and basic theory; asset recognition and measurement; liability recognition and measurement; stockholders’ equity; issues related to income measurement; and preparation and interpretation of financial statements.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201  and ACCT 202  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ACCT 314 - Intermediate Accounting II


    4 credit(s)
    Financial accounting statement interpretation, presentation, and disclosure including coverage of functions and basic theory; asset recognition and measurement; liability recognition and measurement; stockholders’ equity; issues related to income measurement; and preparation and interpretation of financial statements.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 313  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ACCT 316 - Cost Accounting


    4 credit(s)
    Discussion of the nature, objectives and procedures of cost accounting and cost control; job costing and process costing; theory and practice of accounting for manufacturing overhead; cost budgeting and control; cost reports, joint product and by-product costing; distribution costs; standard costs; differential cost analysis; profit volume relationships and break-even analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  or ECON 102 , and ACCT 202 .
  
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    ACCT 318 - Fraud Examination


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to forensic accounting. Students will learn how and why occupational fraud is committed, how fraudulent conduct can be deterred, and how allegations of fraud should be investigated and resolved.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201  with a minimum grade of C- or ACCT 202  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ACCT 355 - New Topics


    1 credit(s)
    Click here for the topic description or see the Advising Center.
  
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    ACCT 357 - Income Tax Accounting


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the structure of federal tax laws and some of the motivating forces and policies shaping tax laws and concepts; determination of taxable income and the income tax liability as they relate to individuals; overview of the taxation of corporations and other entities; and an overview of Oregon income tax laws.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  or ECON 102 , and ACCT 201 .
  
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    ACCT 358 - Community Tax Certification


    2 credit(s)
    Students enroll in this one-credit preparation course in order to qualify as an IRS-certified Tax-Aide Volunteer. Working with a faculty coordinator and CASH Oregon, students receive appropriate training and guidance to assist low income and elderly clients in the community with their individual tax returns.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 357  or ACCT 457 , with minimum grade C-.
  
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    ACCT 359 - Community Tax Engagement


    2 credit(s)
    Students enroll in this 2-credit course after becoming a IRS-certified Tax-Aide Volunteer, i.e., the successful completion of ACCT 358 . Students in this course engage directly with members of the local community, serving as a Tax-Aide Volunteer, assisting elderly and low income individuals with their tax returns. Working under the direction of a faculty coordinator and CASH Oregon, students staff tax assistance centers located throughout the community.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 358 .
  
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    ACCT 370 - Accounting Information Systems


    4 credit(s)
    Provides training and business application for several commercial software programs. These programs include: Intuit’s QuickBooks, desktop and online versions; ProConnect tax software; and Microsoft Office Excel. Students will learn bookkeeping application skills, general tax software operations and basic organization skills and data analytics for Microsoft Excel.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 201  
  
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    ACCT 395 - Independent Study


    1 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ACCT 425 - Advanced Accounting


    4 credit(s)
    Topics in accounting for partnerships, estates, non-profit organizations, local governments, corporate business combinations, consolidated financial statements, and foreign operations.
    Prerequisite(s): ACCT 314  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ACCT 435 - Auditing


    4 credit(s)
    The course will emphasize concepts and principles of auditing and assurance services. It provides an overview of the public accounting profession and the professional standards used in providing auditing and other assurance services, and reporting on financial statements.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or above (90 or more completed credits). ACCT 314  with a minimum grade of C- (may be taken
    concurrently). 
  
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    ACCT 457 - Advanced Income Tax Accounting


    4 credit(s)
    A study of federal income tax as it applies to C corporations, S corporations, partnerships, and limited liability companies (LLC), the gift tax, the estate tax, income taxation of trusts and estates, and internal revenue service administrative procedures. The primary focus of the course will be taxation of corporations.
    Prerequisite(s):  ECON 101  or ECON 102 , and ACCT 201  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 102 - Fundamentals of Business


    4 credit(s)
    Designed as an introduction to the field of business and management, this course exposes students to a variety of organizations including profit and not-for-profit. This foundational course provides students with an introducation to key functional areas of business including accounting, finance, operations and human resource management. Using a series of mini-cases and a dynamic simulation students will oversee managing a business and experience the challenges, risks and rewards of making good decisions. This course offers students a view of the complex and ever-changing environment of business while providing a valuable foundation for business and non-business students alike.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    BA 115 - Personal Finance & Money Management


    4 credit(s)
    This course is designed to introduce non-business students to the language of finance and finance planning. The focus is primarily at the practical level of financial planning, however, examples from and implications of business, government policy and the economy as a whole will be addressed. Students completing the course will gain skills and confidence in reading financial/economic information, creating budgets, managing expenses, performing financial computations to aid daily financial planning.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    BA 116 - Introduction to the Legal Profession


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction and overview of the legal profession including the culture of law schools as well as insight into areas of the practice of law. Structured as a seminar, students will be introduced to the American legal system through a series of lectures by legal professionals and legal educators. Course includes a field trip.
  
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    BA 120 - Business Economics


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the study of micro and macroeconomics and how they are related. Microeconomics explores how individuals, households, and businesses make decisions under uncertainty regarding resource acquisition, allocation, and subsequent transformation into goods and services. The role of demand, supply, and pricing will also be studied. Macroeconomics explores broader factors such as fiscal and monetary policy, employment levels, inflation, price stability, international trade patterns, investment, and globalization.
  
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    BA 155 - New Topics


    See the Advising Center for descriptions.
  
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    BA 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BA 230 - Business Communication


    4 credit(s)
    Focuses on the study of principles, elements, and practices underlying effective business communication. It presents frameworks for writing documents, managing email, and developing presentations. Methods for organizing ideas, understanding audience needs, and developing innovative approaches to data analysis, information formatting, and professional communication will be incorporated using cases and exercises that emphasize informative communication and collaborative strategies that reflect real-world challenges.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing (30 or more completed credits) and ENGW 180 or 181 or 182 with grade of C- or higher
  
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    BA 255 - New Topics


    1-4 credit(s)
    See the Advising Center for descriptions.
  
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    BA 256 - Leaders & Leadership


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an overview of leaders and leadership from ancient times to the modern era. We will assess how the historical context as well as notions of gender, race, sexuality, and class have shaped convictions about effective leadership. Reading texts from Herodotus, the Bible, Saint Augustine, Machiavelli, Sun Tzu, and theories put forth in contemporary leadership studies, we will analyze the use of rhetoric, political skills, emotional intelligence, passion, team work, decision-making, conflict resolution, and grit that has propelled leaders in the fields of politics, business, the military, social movements, and religion. We will investigate the characteristics deemed necessary in a leader, various leadership styles (situational, autocratic, facilitative, cross-cultural, servant, transformational), the tension between effectiveness and ethics, and the emerging fields of thought leaders and “influencers.” Offered alternate years.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    BA 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    BA 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BA 301 - Business Analytics


    4 credit(s)
    Provides students with the fundamental concepts and tools needed to understand the emerging role of business analytics in organizations to manipulate data. Introduces students to fundamental methods of data analysis and statistics, including but not limited to data visualization, descriptive statistical measures, probability distributions, data modeling, sampling, estimation, and regression analysis. Engages students in abstract mathematical thinking and guides them to understand analytical and formal deductive reasoning. Students will also learn how to apply these procedures to real data sets in business and other areas using Microsoft Excel.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 122 , with a minimum grade of C-. 
  
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    BA 302 - Entrepreneurship & Small Business


    4 credit(s)
    Development of the students’ understanding of the economic and social environment in which small businesses function and the critical role of entrepreneurship in fostering business growth and development. The processes involved in initiating new ventures are discussed. The course focuses on the operations, marketing, financial, human resources and strategic management as well as the legal and governmental relations of the small firm. A detailed treatment of the problems involved in managing specific fields of small businesses in both service and manufacturing.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 305 - Business Finance


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the financial principles applicable to the business organization. Financial management of assets and the need for funds, sources and cost of obtaining short-term and long-term funds, capital budgeting. MS Excel and MS Access are integrated into this course.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 , or ECON 102 , and ACCT 201 , all with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 306 - Business Law


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to the structure and functions of the American legal system followed by an overview of specific topics that are applicable to business. Topics include: contracts, sales, negotiable instruments, bankruptcy, suretyship, agency, partnerships, corporations, federal securities law, accountants, legal liability, employer and employee relationships, property, trusts and estates.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 309 - Marketing


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to marketing concepts and application of these concepts to the marketing of products, services, ideas, organizations, and people in both profit-oriented and nonprofit business environments. Topics include: marketing’s role in society and within the firm; environmental evaluation; consumer buying behavior; market segmentation and target market selection; management of marketing mix variables (product, price, placement, promotion). Students gain experience in problem solving and communication through case study analysis and presentations.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 310 - Social Media Marketing


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an introduction to the platforms and strategies that companies use to communicate and market themselves through social media. This class will cover how to run a social audit and formulate a strategy on social media as well as key metrics that are used to measure performance. Class discussion, case analyses and class activities will be used to analyze current trends in social media marketing.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 309 .
  
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    BA 312 - International Business


    4 credit(s)
    Survey course covering recent and important issues in international business, trade and investment. Topics might include the International Business environment, the government and regulatory environment, international comparative environments, international monetary environment, international marketing, international finance, management strategies, and the future of international business.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirements: International Perspectives, Diverse Perspectives, and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 320 - Human Resource Management


    4 credit(s)
    Functions of the personnel department in a business organization. Contributions of research in the social sciences to personnel administration. Operation and techniques of a personnel department including job evaluation, employee recruiting and selection, psychological testing, employment counseling, wage administration, labor management relations and other personnel programs.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits)
  
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    BA 330 - Technology Management


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the study of technology management. This course will introduce students to the phenomena of technology and the integral role it plays in the competitive development and growth of businesses. The primary focus will be on understanding the managerial aspects involved in managing technology in business organizations and how technology is critical in fostering competitive advantage.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101, ECON 102, each with a minimum grade of C-, and Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 345 - Corporate Finance


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the theory of corporate finance and the methods to understand how a firm’s financing, investing, and operative activities affect its value and how to make investment decisions based on available financial and accounting information. Systematically covers the three major topics of corporate finance: corporate financial statement quality analysis, corporate financial statement adjustments, and investments to corporate assets.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 305  with a minimum grade C-.
  
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    BA 350 - Operations Management


    4 credit(s)
    Study of key concepts, quantitative techniques, and practices used in the management of the production of goods and services. Includes examination of product and process design, process analysis, total quality management, project management, materials management, capacity planning, work design, facility layout and operational scheduling.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), ECON 101 , ECON 102 , and Statistics (MATH 207 MATH 316 SOC 301 , or PSY 350 ), each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 352 - Investments


    4 credit(s)
    To gain a knowledge and understanding of: marketable securities including common stocks, bonds, and options; fundamental and technical security analysis; and of current financial events found in financial news.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 305  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 354 - Financial Markets and Institutions


    4 credit(s)
    An examination of the role of financial institutions and markets and the role they play in the business environment. Emphasis will be placed on studying the organization, structure and securities operations of money markets and capital markets (stock, bond, mortgage, mortgage-backed securities, swaps). The course also addresses the role of financial statements and analysis; risk management of commercial banks as well as the role of non-depository institutions (investment banks, insurance companies, mutual funds, the Federal Reserve Systems) as part of the financial market system.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 305  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 355 - New Topics


    See the Advising Center for descriptions.
  
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    BA 360 - Organizational Behavior Management


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the functions of management and to the theory of human behavior in organizations. Management history, attitudes, skills, and managerial processes as well as an investigation of the theories of human behavior, motivation, communication, decision making, group and social processes, organizational culture, power, and leadership are addressed.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    BA 390 - Digital Marketing


    4 credit(s)
    A comprehensive introduction to conducting marketing activites online, including methods such as search engine optimization, online advertising, social media and email marketing. We will cover metrics and analytics that firms use to build their marketing strategy. Hands on experience using digital platforms along with case analyses will be used to illustrate concepts used in the digital marketing environment.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 309 .
 

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