Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

English as a Second Language

These are language acquisition courses that do not apply to undergraduate degrees at Pacific University.

  
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    ESL 051B - High Beginning Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for developing paragraphs using a variety of different organization styles. Editing skills are introduced.
  
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    ESL 052A - Low Intermediate Writing & Editing A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for combining paragraphs into short compositions. Editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 052B - Low Intermediate Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for combining paragraphs into short compositions. Editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 053A - Intermediate Writing & Editing A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course guides students through the development of short compositions, focusing on different rhetorical patterns common in academic writing. Editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 053B - Intermediate Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course guides students through the development of short compositions, focusing on different rhetorical patterns common in academic writing. Editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 054A - High Intermediate Writing & Editing A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to expand their skills in writing short compositions into longer, more complex essays. Content is emphasized in addition to structure. Self and peer editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 054B - High Intermediate Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to expand their skills in writing short compositions into longer, more complex essays. Content is emphasized in addition to structure. Self and peer editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 055A - Low Advanced Writing & Editing A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to produce academic style essays. A variety of rhetorical forms are practiced and an emphasis is placed on logical support of theses. Self and peer editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 055B - Low Advanced Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to produce academic style essays. A variety of rhetorical forms are practiced and an emphasis is placed on logical support of theses. Self and peer editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 056A - Advanced Writing & Editing A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. In this course, students have the opportunity to polish their academic writing skills with special attention on self-editing skills. In addition, students are guided through the process of developing in depth research papers including how to choose reliable sources and appropriately cite these sources.
  
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    ESL 056B - Advanced Writing & Editing B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. In this course, students have the opportunity to polish their academic writing skills with special attention on self-editing skills. In addition, students are guided through the process of developing in depth research papers including how to choose reliable sources and appropriately cite these sources.
  
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    ESL 057 - Writing & Editing I


    2 credit(s)
    This course prepares students for academic writing by working on sentence and paragraph structure. In addition, students will work on punctuation and grammar, learning to identify and correct errors in their writing.
  
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    ESL 058 - Writing & Editing II


    2 credit(s)
    This course gives students the opportunity to practice their academic writing skills by producing a variety of types of essays and learning to identify and correct errors in their writing. They will also work on peer editing.
  
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    ESL 060A - Beginning Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to write grammatically correct sentences. This skill is used as the basis for an introduction to paragraph writing. Grammar concepts are introduced in relation to student writing.
  
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    ESL 060B - Beginning Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to write grammatically correct sentences. This skill is used as the basis for an introduction to paragraph writing. Grammar concepts are introduced in relation to student writing.
  
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    ESL 061A - High Beginning Writing & Grammar a


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for developing paragraphs using a variety of different organization styles. Sentence structure and grammar concepts are presented and reinforced.
  
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    ESL 061B - High Beginning Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for developing paragraphs using a variety of different organization styles. Sentence structure and grammar concepts are presented and reinforced.
  
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    ESL 062A - Low Intermediate Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for combining paragraphs into short compositions. Grammar concepts are presented in relation to students’ writing needs and editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 062B - Low Intermediate Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course takes students through the writing process for combining paragraphs into short compositions. Grammar concepts are presented in relation to students’ writing needs and editing skills are developed.
  
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    ESL 063A - Intermediate Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course guides students through the development of short compositions, focusing on different rhetorical patterns common in academic writing. The presentation of sentence structures includes complex forms.
  
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    ESL 063B - Intermediate Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course guides students through the development of short compositions, focusing on different rhetorical patterns common in academic writing. The presentation of sentence structures includes complex forms.
  
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    ESL 064A - High Intermediate Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to expand their skills in writing short compositions into longer, more complex essays. Content is emphasized in addition to structure. Self and peer editing skills are developed with a focus on grammatical errors.
  
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    ESL 064B - High Intermediate Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to expand their skills in writing short compositions into longer, more complex essays. Content is emphasized in addition to structure. Self and peer editing skills are developed with a focus on grammatical errors.
  
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    ESL 065A - Low Advanced Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to produce academic style essays. A variety of rhetorical forms are practiced and an emphasis is placed on logical support of theses. Grammar concepts are presented as needed in accordance with student writing.
  
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    ESL 065B - Low Advanced Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. This course prepares students to produce academic style essays. A variety of rhetorical forms are practiced and an emphasis is placed on logical support of theses. Grammar concepts are presented as needed in accordance with student writing.
  
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    ESL 066A - Advanced Writing & Grammar A


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. In this course, students have the opportunity to polish their academic writing skills. In addition, students are guided through the process of developing in depth research papers including how to choose reliable sources and appropriately cite these sources.
  
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    ESL 066B - Advanced Writing & Grammar B


    2 credit(s)
    A two course sequence in one term. In this course, students have the opportunity to polish their academic writing skills. In addition, students are guided through the process of developing in depth research papers including how to choose reliable sources and appropriately cite these sources.
  
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    ESL 067 - Writing & Grammar I


    2 credit(s)
    This course prepares students for academic writing by working on sentence and paragraph structure. Students will also work extensively on the grammar concepts needed for their writing.
  
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    ESL 068 - Writing & Grammar II


    2 credit(s)
    This course gives students the opportunity to practice their academic writing skills by producing a variety of types of essays. In conjunction, students will focus on the grammar needed to improve their writing skills.
  
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    ESL 090 - Special Topics


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students to explore areas of special interest to the students and faculty. Students will use and develop their English skills to explore topics related to their community. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    ESL 095 - Independent Study


    2 credit(s)
    This course is offered upon approval by and collaboration with a faculty member only. Independent study contract required.

English Language Institute Transition Program

  
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    ELITR 101 - Acad Culture and Communication


    3 credit(s)
    This course helps students acquire the oral skills and competencies required to succeed in American academic settings. Students will learn efficient listening and note-taking strategies for lectures and consider the appropriate register for interactions with professors and peers in formal as well as informal situations. Students will practice formal oral presentations and through self and peer critique, become more capable and confident in their speaking and listening abilities. Only available to students of the Transition Program. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score of 475.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ELI program courses.
  
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    ELITR 102 - Amer Persp: Ethnically Speaking


    3 credit(s)
    This course will give international students an opportunity to view the diversity of culture found in the United States from a variety of perspectives. Through essays, films and lectures, students will discover lifestyles, traditions and customs practiced by different populations of Americans. Students will interview American students about their opinions and perspectives practicing ethnographical type research to observe these practices firsthand. This class will focus on different ethnic groups in the U.S.:Hispanic, African American, Native American, Asian American and European American. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score of 475.
  
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    ELITR 103 - Academic and Research Writing


    3 credit(s)
    Academic and Research Writing is the composition component of the ELI Transition Program. This course prepares students for the writing tasks, research methodologies, and documentation formats they are likely to encounter in their academic programs. Students will build upon their understanding of the basic rhetorical modes to develop their arguments in a fully documented research essay. Only available to students in the Transition Program. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score of 475.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ELI program courses.
  
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    ELITR 104 - American Perspectives: Demo Differences


    3 credit(s)
    This course will give international students an opportunity to view the diversity of culture found in the United States from a variety of perspectives. Through essays, films and lectures, students will discover lifestyles, traditions and customs practiced by different populations of Americans. Students will be involved in a variety of activities including interviewing American students about their opinions and perspectives, comparing students’ own cultural practices with American practices, and practicing ethnographical type research to observe these practices firsthand. “American Perspectives: Demographic Differences” focuses on topics relevant to and seen through the eyes of different groups in the United States, including the elderly, lesbians and gays, people of the southern United States, and others. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score of 475.
    Corequisite(s): Concurrent enrollment in ELI program courses.
  
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    ELITR 105 - American Society Through Film


    3 credit(s)
    This course will introduce international students to many aspects of American society and culture through movies. In addition to enhancing students’ cultural understanding, this course will help students develop strong critical-thinking and analytic skills as they learn to recognize, interpret and question messages about American society found in the films. Students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth an area of American society reflected in film that is of personal interest to them. Research and classroom presentations will be required. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): TOEFL score of 475 or higher and concurrent enrollment in ELI program courses.

English Literature

  
  
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    ENGL 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.
  
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    ENGL 220 - Literature and Human Concerns


    2-4 credit(s)
    A study of important ideas and problems as they are reflected in the world’s literature. War, racism, death, censorship, film, civil disobedience, minority literature, and the Holocaust are examples of characteristic topics. Please see department for additional information on specific offerings. May be repeated for credit when content varies.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENGL 221 - Disability and Literature


    4 credit(s)
    The historian Sander Gilman calls literature “the art of writing down a culture’s dreams.” It is interesting to note, then, how many of Western culture’s dreams are of the physically or mentally different, the monstrous (so-perceived) and the maimed, the crippled and the crazed. From Sophocles’ Philoctetes to Dunn’s Geek Love, this course explores how and why authors of various periods have imagined and represented physical and cognitive difference.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENGL 222 - Environmental Literature


    4 credit(s)
    Environmental Literature aims to critically examine our relationship to nature through the study of major American nature writers. We will consider each writer’s ability to generate environmental thought (historically, politically, philosophically) and to survey how nature writing as a genre has taken its current form. The course hopes to acknowledge and challenge current assumptions on nature such as how wilderness has shaped the American imagination and even how labeling nature as “Mother Earth” implies a great deal of how we perceive and receive nature now. Also listed as ENV 222 
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENGL 223 - Native American Literature


    4 credit(s)
    This course will examine narrative styles and themes in Native American literature, and focus on how such literature embodies traditional American Indian concepts of identity, time, space, spirit, history, and community. How Native American literature adapts oral literature and its traditions to the requirements of written literature is central to the course. The course also includes study of myths, pastiche, and humor as literary modes employed to challenge stereotypical depictions of “the Indian” in dominant Western culture. Authors include Linda Hogan, Louise Erdrich, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, Sherman Alexie, James Welch, Paula Gunn Allen.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement (2010-17 catalogs); Diverse Perspectives, Historical Context.
  
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    ENGL 227 - World Literature: Magical Realism


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to literature drawn from Western and non-Western cultures, organized around a theme, a literary problem, or the examination of a political condition. Ordinarily, the reading lists will include several genres.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
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    ENGL 229 - U.S. Literature


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to selected American authors and themes.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENGL 232 - British Literature


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to selected British writers and themes.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    ENGL 236 - Postmodernism in Film and Literature


    2 credit(s)
    Traces postmodernism from its origins to the present, providing a historical, cultural, and theoretical context to frame discussions of such postmodernist authors as Beckett, Borges and Calvino, and film directors such as Haneke, the Coen brothers and Spike Jonze. We will consider how typical postmodernist techniques, such as the settling of frames within frames, the mosaic of merging of genres and styles, and the use of hyperspace, reflect post-WWII shifts in politics and philosophy. Overall, we will develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts that make postmodernism, such as fragmentation, mise-en-abyme, play, decentering, simulacra, and metafiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
  
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    ENGL 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ENGL 295 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ENGL 320 - Advanced Literature & Human Concerns


    2-4 credit(s)
    An advanced study of important ideas and problems as they are reflected in the world’s literature. War, racism, death, censorship, film, civil disobedience, minority literature, and the Holocaust are examples of characteristic topics. Advanced study will include a research component for investigating the literature in a more substantive manner than the lower division section of this same course. Please see department for additional information on specific offerings. May be repeated for credit when content varies.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENGL 323 - Shakespeare in Repertory


    4 credit(s)
    How did the theatre industry-playhouses, personnel, playwrights-shape the marketplace in which William Shakespeare would come to train? In this course, students explore the theatreland of Renaissance London through the two biggest companies of the 1590s: the Lord Strange’s and Lord Admiral’s players. Considering questions of competition and innovation by exploring repertory-based strategies such as sequels, thematic seasons, and typecasting, students will employ a range of critical frameworks-including Repertory Studies, New Historicist, Performance Studies, and Textual Editing-to analyze early modern manuscripts, interrogate the scholarly apparatuses through which they are disseminated, and illuminate the ways in which literary canons become entrenched.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  
  
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    ENGL 324 - PostCol Lit:Tales of Conquests Retold


    4 credit(s)
    We will explore African, Indian, Latino, Caribbean, Eastern-European, and/or Middle-Eastern texts that examine the psychological, political, and cultural effects of colonization and decolonization. We will delve into the power shifts and issues of trauma and identity that accompany decolonization. Furthermore, we will examine historical examples of decolonization and investigate contemporary manifestations of colonization through discussing the complex consequences of globalization, a “new” imperialism, and nationalism.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    ENGL 336 - Postmodernism in Film and Literature II


    2 credit(s)
    Traces postmodernism from its origins to the present, providing a historical, cultural, and theoretical context to frame discussions of such postmodernist authors as Beckett, Borges and Calvino, and film directors such as Haneke, the Coen Brothers and Spike Jonze. We will consider how typical postmodernist techniques, such as the setting of frames within frames, the mosaic merging of genres and styles, and the use of hyperspace, reflect post WWII shifts in politics and philosophy. Upper-level students will have advanced readings and assignments on the concepts of postmodernism, such as fragmentation, mise-en-abyme, play, decentering, simulacra, and metafiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    ENGL 337 - Medieval English Literature


    4 credit(s)
    An advanced study of the major works of Anglo-Norman and Middle English literature (673-1485 CE), whose production was informed by vernacular developments in religious life, commonwealth politics, and the rise of the individual. Questions of individual and collective subjectivities will be explored via early Anglo-Saxon poetry, “Beowulf,” “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” “Everyman,” and other mystery cycle plays, as well as works by Geoffrey of Manmouth, Marie de France, Geoffery Chaucer, Margery Kempe, and Sir Thomas Mallory, among others.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-
  
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    ENGL 338 - English Renaissance Literature


    4 credit(s)
    An advanced study of the major works of the English Renaissance (1485-1660 CE) exploring the question: how does a culture make itself again or see itself anew? This question will be explored via poetic movements illustrated by Sir Thomas Wyatt, Sir Philip Sidney, John Donne, George Herbert, and Andrew Marvell; developments in political thought via Thomas More, Elizabeth I, Sir Francis Bacon, Thomas Hobbes, and John  Milton; the dramatic output of John Lyly, William Shakespeare, and Christopher Marlowe; and the representation of female and minority voices with the works of Anne Askew, Amelia Lanyer, and Margaret Cavendish among others.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-
  
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    ENGL 340 - Studies in Drama


    4 credit(s)
    The reading and analysis of chief European and American playwrights from the authors of the morality plays to the present, with some consideration of the dramaturgy involved in the production of plays.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGL 341 - Studies in Poetry


    4 credit(s)
    An upper level introduction to reading poetry, with an emphasis on structure, traditional models, periods and interpretation.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    ENGL 342 - Studies in Fiction


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the development of the short story and novel, with an emphasis on exploring interpretive models. Also listed GSS 342  when content allows.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    ENGL 343 - Studies in Criticism & Theory


    4 credit(s)
    A study and application of some of the critical and theoretical approaches used in the study of literature. Also listed as PHIL 343 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    ENGL 344 - Studies in Creative Nonfiction


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the various modes of creative nonfiction in history (personal essays, journalism, travel and nature writing, memoirs, lyric, etc.) and the more recent controversy over the collision of factual stories employing literary techniques.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
  
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    ENGL 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.
  
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    ENGL 421 - The Romantic Period


    4 credit(s)
    An advanced study of the poetry and poetics and prose of the Romantic Period of British Literature, with special emphasis on the affects on a variety of poets of the emerging Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and its aftermath, and new paradigms of thought in the way people perceived nature and gender roles, among other topics.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    ENGL 422 - The Victorian Period


    4 credit(s)
    An advanced study of several literary genres during the Victorian Period of British Literature (1837-1901), with special emphasis on the affects on authors of the triumph of the Industrial Revolution, the rise of Darwin’s theories, the challenges to religious and social orthodoxies, and changes in aesthetics, among other topics. Authors to be studied could include such figures as Austen, Dickens, Eliot, Tennyson, the Rosettis, Arnold, Swinburne, Hopkins, Ruskin, Shaw, Gissing, the Brownings, Mill, and others.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    ENGL 423 - The American Romantics


    4 credit(s)
    Intensive study in the period including such writers as Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, Dickinson, Whitman, Gilman, and the literature of slavery and abolition.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    ENGL 425 - Studies in 20th Century Literature


    4 credit(s)
    In-depth studies of the major movements in Twentieth Century Literature. Not a survey class, the content will vary. The focus may be on a particular genre.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    ENGL 430 - Major Writers


    4 credit(s)
    A detailed study of the works of selected writers; for example, Chaucer, Milton, Dickens, Blake, Yeats, Thoreau, Woolf. Also listed as GSS 430  when content allows.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above May be repeated once for when content varies.
  
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    ENGL 431 - Literature & Publishing: Special Topics


    4 credit(s)
    An in-depth study of a Major Writer with the background material of his or her experiences with publishing. Each section of the course will explore the works of an author within the historical, technological and economic context of his/her contemporary modes of publication. For example: Dickens’ experience provides a particularly illustrative example of serialized publication practices and their influences on the style of 19th century fiction.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed) and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from ENGL 200-level or above.
  
  
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    ENGL 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ENGL 495 - Senior Seminar: Literature


    2 credit(s)
    Students in this capstone experience for literature majors will discuss the state of literature, criticism, and writers in contemporary society, reflecting on the tradition of literature and literary study, and develop, present, and critique original critical work. Students will produce a 20-30 page thesis, with annotated bibliography, and present their work publicly.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed) and declared Literature major.
  
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    ENGL 496 - Senior Seminar: Literature


    2 credit(s)
    Students in this capstone experience for literature majors will discuss the state of literature, criticism, and writers in contemporary society, reflecting on the tradition of literature and literary study, and develop, present, and critique original critical work. Students will produce a 20-30 page thesis, with annotated bibliography, and present their work publicly.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Prerequisite(s): ENGL 495 .

English Writing

  
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    DS 183 - Writing About Disability


    4 credit(s)
    Writing-intensive course that introduces students to the field of Disability Studies. Disability Studies understands disability as referring not only to a biological or medical condition, but also to a community of people (the largest minority in the U.S.); to a civil rights movement; to a complex set of social and ethical issues; and to a universal human experience. This course develops students’ understanding of disability in its social, cultural, and ethical dimensions. It will also help students build critical-thinking skills, understand rhetorical methods, and shape effective prose styles, culminating in a research paper. Students may take ENGW 180 or ENGW 181 or ENGW 182 or ENGW 183 or DS 183 to satisfy the core writing requirement, but may only earn credit for one of these courses. ENGW 183  
    Offered: Spring; alternating years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing.
  
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    ENGW 180 - Writing & Research


    4 credit(s)
    Academic inquiry where students design and develop a research project in a subject area of their choosing that culminates in a major written assignment. Students will learn the conventions of academic writing and develop critical reading and writing skills relevant across the disciplines to draft, revise, and edit a print or digital text. Students may take ENGW 180 or ENGW 181 or
    ENGW 182 or ENGW 183 or DS 183 to satisfy the core, but may only earn credit for one of these courses. Previously Listed As: ENGW 201
    Offered: Offered every semester.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing
  
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    ENGW 181 - Writing About Disability CE


    4 credit(s)
    This writing-intensive course introduces the Disability Studies field. Disability Studies understands disability as referring not only to medical conditions, but also to a community of people; to a civil rights movement; to a complex set of social and ethical issues; to a universal human experience; and to the ways cultures respond to particular bodies, minds, and behaviors. This course develops understanding of disability in its social, cultural, and ethical dimensions. It will also help students build critical-thinking skills, understand rhetorical methods, and shape effective prose styles. Previously listed as ENGW 202.

    Students may take ENGW 180 or ENGW 181 or ENGW 182 or ENVW 183 or DS 183 to satisfy the core Writing requirement, but may earn credit for only one of these courses. Previously Listed As: ENGW 202
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing & Civic Engagement.

  
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    ENGW 182 - Book Editing & Design I


    4 credit(s)
    Writing-intensive course simulates a working arts environment in which students develop expository, analytical, and creative essays in collaboration with their peers. Mentored by their ENGW 304  peers, students receive practical training in developmental editing, copyediting, and proofreading. In so doing, students develop critical-thinking skills, sharpen and deepen their creative work, and understand the role editing plays in developing concise, effective prose.

    Students may take ENGW 180 or ENGW 181 or ENGW 182 or ENGW 183 or DS 183 to satisfy the core Writing requirement, but may earn credit for only one of these courses.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing.

  
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    ENGW 183 - Writing About Disability


    4 credit(s)
    Writing-intensive course that introduces students to the field of Disability Studies. Disability Studies understands disability as referring not only to a biological or medical condition, but also to a community of people (the largest minority in the U.S.); to a civil rights movement; to a complex set of social and ethical issues; and to a universal human experience. This course develops students’ understanding of disability in its social, cultural, and ethical dimensions. It will also help students build critical-thinking skills, understand rhetorical methods, and shape effective prose styles, culminating in a research paper. Students may take ENGW 180 or ENGW 181 or ENGW 182 or ENGW 183 or DS 183 to satisfy the core writing requirement, but may only earn credit for one of these courses. DS 183  
    Offered: Spring; alternating years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing.
  
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    ENGW 206 - Creative Writing, Poetry


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to writing poetry.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 207 - Mixed Genres


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to writing in two or more of the following genres: short fiction, drama, poetry, and the personal essay.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 208 - Creative Writing, Fiction


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to writing fiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 209 - Creative Writing, Nonfiction


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to creative nonfiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 222 - Travel Writing Prep


    2 credit(s)
    The class prepares students for ENGW 226 - Travel Writing . This semester long course will provide students the necessary skills pertinent to writing in response to travel. Students will be exposed to the various modes of writing within the genre through readings and practice those modes through their own writing about place in a variety of forms such as blogs, essays, memoir, guidebooks, articles, etc. A specific focus on journal keeping, observational skills, and strong, narrative based prose will provide a solid foundation for students seeking an introduction to travel writing.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ENGW 226 - Travel Writing


    2 credit(s)
    Provides students the opportunity to apply the skills learned in the Preparation for Travel Writing course while traveling abroad. By immersing themselves in another culture and place, students will practice the skills of effective journaling, deep observation, and descriptive writing. Upon return from travel, students should be equipped with both the skills and material to craft an engaging, travel story.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Corequisite(s): ENGW 222 .
  
  
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    ENGW 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ENGW 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ENGW 303 - Tutoring in Writing Skills


    1 credit(s)
    Tutoring in Writing Skills prepares students working in the Writing Resource Center to consult with peers on their writing. Through reflection, discussion, and practice with their own writing and tutoring processes, students will gain a deeper understanding not only of themselves as writers but also as mentors to others in their writing.
  
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    ENGW 304 - Writing: Book Editing and Design II


    4 credit(s)
    This writing-intensive course simulates a working arts environment in which students develop expository, analytical, and creative essays in collaboration with their peers. Students will play a significant role in the design, editing, and marketing of a final collection of student-composed work. In addition, students will mentor their ENGW 182  peers in publishing and editing while expanding their own knowledge of book design and promotion.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180  , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with minimum grade C-.
  
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    ENGW 305W - Research Methods in English


    4 credit(s)
    In addition to developing higher-order skills of discipline-specific research-archival, secondary, references-and argumentation, this course prepares English majors for a range of possible careers. Students will be introduced to the resumes, CV, and cover letters genres; master the conventions of professional discourse through social media, email, and conference networking; and develop an intellectual agenda that encompasses the capstone thesis as well as future projects, grants and fellowship applications.
    Offered: Spring

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standign (60 credits or above); ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182 ; declared Creative Writing or English Literature major or minor.
  
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    ENGW 306 - Advanced Poetry Writing


    4 credit(s)
    A workshop for writing and discussing poetry.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-; ENGW 206  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 308 - Advanced Fiction Writing


    4 credit(s)
    A workshop for writing and discussing fiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-; ENGW 208  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 309 - Advanced Creative Nonfiction


    4 credit(s)
    A workshop for writing and discussing creative nonfiction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-; ENGW 209  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENGW 322 - Travel, Write and Publish Prep


    2 credit(s)
    Prepares students for ENGW 326 - Travel, Write and Publish . Will provide students the necessary skills pertinent to writing in response to travel. Students will be exposed to the various modes of writing within the genre through readings and practice those modes through their own writing about place and publishing such writing in a variety of forms such as blogs, essays, memoir, guidebooks, articles, etc. A specific focus on journal keeping, observational skills, and strong, narrative based prose will combine with an aim to publishing original work.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 , ENGW 181   or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-
  
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    ENGW 326 - Travel, Write and Publish


    2 credit(s)
    Provides students the opportunity to apply the skills learned in the preparation for travel in Travel, Write, and Publish course while traveling abroad. By immersing themselves in another culture and place, students will practice the skills of effective journaling, deep observation, and descriptive writing. Upon return from travel, students should be equipped with both the skills and material to craft an engaging, travel story, and identify outlets for publishing their original work.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 322 - Travel, Write and Publish Prep  and ENGW 180 ENGW 181 , or ENGW 182 .
  
  
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    ENGW 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  
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    ENGW 466 - Literary Magazine Production


    2 credit(s)
    A course in literary magazine production. Students work with graduate students in Pacific’s MFA in Writing program to produce a nationally distributed literary review. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    ENGW 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
  •  

    ENGW 495 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.
 

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