Nov 30, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Kinesiology

  
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    KINES 200 - Kinesiology: Techniques


    1 credit(s)
    A continuation of the introduction to the field of Kinesiology, focusing on basic formal analysis and reporting techniques and skills. Students will participate in small scale experiments to measure classic phenomena to acquire datasets for the academic exercises.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits). MATH 122  or placement (may be taken concurrently), and KINES 100 , all with a minimum grade of C.

     

  
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    KINES 215 - Nutrition


    4 credit(s)
    Detailed study of the relationship between nutrition and total individual health across the life-span. Emphasis will be placed on the essential nutrient chemical conversions during digestion, absorption and metabolism and their contribution to optimal health. Individual nutritional analysis and a personalized diet plan will be required. Previously Listed As: EXIP 281
  
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    KINES 216 - Hunger and the Global Environment


    2 credit(s)
    Provides students with an introduction to the politics, economics, and policies associated with the global crises of hunger, malnutrition, and food security.  How do politics influence food production and consumption?  How can a food surplus and hunger coexist?  What implications do changes to the food system have on society and the environment?
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits). Recommended: KINES 215  
  
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    KINES 241 - Mental Skills Training


    2 credit(s)
    Provides a broad overview of the mental skills needed to improve outcomes in a variety of performance-related domains (e.g., music, sport, theater, speech and debate). Students will learn the theories behind and how to use a variety of mental skills including self-talk, imagery, concentration, goal setting, among others. The impact of mental skills usage on concepts such as arousal and anxiety regulation, intrinsic motivation, self-confidence, and performance behaviors (among others) will be explored.
  
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    KINES 250 - Select Topics


    1-4 credit(s)
    Study of a particular topic in the field of Kinesiology selected by the instructor and approved by the Kinesiology Department. May or may not include lab/practical activity. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  
  
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    KINES 265 - Introduction to Sport Leadership


    2 credit(s)
    Provides an introduction to leadership in the sports field including coaching, recreational programing and physical education. Emphasis will be placed on understanding professional expectations/regulations, ethics, preparation/training and program management.
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 100  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 295 - Independent Study


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  
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    KINES 300 - Kinesiology: Evidence


    2 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the primary research literature in the field of Kinesiology. Topics include procedures for locating sources of information; introduction to various research methodologies; training in the consumption of literature across multiple Kinesiology subdisciplines, understanding and analyzing results of scientific studies; training in human subject research ethics and the Institutional Review Board process; and enhancing disciplinary writing skills. Previously Listed As: EXIP 399 Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): 8 credits of upper-division KINES all with a minimum grade of C, HBIO 231 , and ENGW 180  (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    KINES 311 - Health Behavior Change


    2 credit(s)
    Examines health behavior theories and their applications to health promotion.  Students will become familiar with concepts fundamental in the understanding of human health behavior in the context of current theory and recognize the role of personal, social, and environmental factors that encourage or discourage behavior.  Strategies for using a theoretical foundation in planning effective health education and health promotion programs will be included.
    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Junior Standing (60 or more completed credits). PH 101 KINES 200 , EXMB 200, or PSY 150 .  
  
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    KINES 312 - Exercise & Global Disease


    2 credit(s)
    Examines the integration of public health with kinesiology, the effects of physical activity on health, and the strategies for physical activity promotion. Students will learn of the interrelationships between various diseases and disabilities that develop with inactivity, as well as how to utilize public health practice strategies for implementation of programming related to physical activity. Topics in the course focus on evidence-based strategies, as well as on key approaches to program development, implementation, and evaluation. Previously Listed As: EXMB 371
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 200 , EXMB 200, or PH 101  with a minimum grade of C. 
  
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    KINES 320 - Biomechanics & Lab


    4 credit(s)
    Study of the structure and functioning of the human body via the methods of classical mechanics. Previously Listed As: EXIP 345
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): HBIO 230 MATH 125 , and KINES 200  or EXMB 200, all with minimum grades of C.  
  
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    KINES 325 - Physiology of Exercise & Lab


    4 credit(s)
    The branch of physiology that deals with function of the body during exercise and adaptations that occur in response. Knowledge and application of scientific principles are necessary to develop peak performance in athletes and maintain health and fitness in the general population - quantitatively and qualitatively improving life. Previously Listed As: EXIP 385
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 200 , or EXMB 200 and HBIO 231  with a minimum grade of C. 
  
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    KINES 330 - Perceptual Motor Learning


    4 credit(s)
    Study of issues related to the understanding, teaching and learning of motor skills. Examination of factors (individual, task, environment) and interactions that influence skill acquisition and performance in daily, recreational, clinical and scientific contexts. Previously Listed As: EXIP 365
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 200  or EXMB 200 with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 331 - Human Motor Development


    2 credit(s)
    Designed to use a lecture/discussion/activity structure to study issues related to the development of human motor behavior over the lifespan. Current theory and research will be discussed related to motor and behavioral changes that are commonly experienced in humans from early childhood to late adulthood. Previously Listed As: EXMB 336
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 330  or EXIP 365 with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 340 - Psychosocial Factors in Kinesiology


    4 credit(s)
    Focuses on the social and psychological factors related to participation in sport and physical activity. Students will gain competency in theory and research through the study of such topics of personality, gender, motivation, and socioeconomic status, among others. The focus will be on the North American experience; however, examples from around the world will be used to help students gain different perspectives of the relative importance of sport in North America, the relative abundance of opportunities to participate in physical activity in North America, and the relative increase in the number of barriers to participating in physical activity across the globe. Previously Listed As: EXMB 335
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior. International & Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits). KINES 200  or EXMB 200 with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 342 - Behavioral Aspects of Injury & Rehab


    2 credit(s)
    Examines the relationship between a host of behavioral factors and sport injuries. This relationship will be analyzed from several angles, including predictors of injury, injury’s effect on well-being, the process of injury and rehab, among others. This course will provide frameworks for understanding the psychological and sociological factors involved in working with sport injuries.
    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Junior Standing or above (60 or more completed credits). PSY 150  or KINES 340 .
  
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    KINES 350 - Select Topics


    1-4 credit(s)
    Study of a particular topic in the field of Kinesiology selected by the instructor and approved by the Kinesiology Department. May or may not include lab/practical activity. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  
  
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    KINES 383 - Fitness Testing & Prescription


    2 credit(s)
    Focuses on the scientific principles, methods and materials relevant to the design and implementation of strength, endurance, flexibility, speed, power, balance and agility enhancement for adult fitness based on sound scientific principles. Previously Listed As: EXMB 313
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 325  with a minimum grade of C. Recommended:KINES 320 
  
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    KINES 395 - Independent Study


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  
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    KINES 400W - Advanced Kinesiology


    2 credit(s)
    Develops the greater knowledge dept and more sophisticated skills needed to critically analyze existing research literature and design original investigations in a sub-disciplinary area of kinesiology that matches students’ interests, backgrounds and goals. Topics will fall within the recognized expertise area of the instructor. Includes active learning components. Previously Listed As: Previously listed as EXIP 400
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Disciplines.
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 300 , and MATH 207 MATH 307 , or SOC 301 , and 12 additional upper-division KINES credits. All with a minimum grade of C. Instructor’s Consent required. 
  
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    KINES 415 - Nutrition for Optimal Performance


    2 credit(s)
    Explores nutrition in the enhancement of health and fitness. Discussion includes the nutrient requirements for attainment and maintenance of health, disease prevention, and sports performance. Claims targeting the exercising population, including appropriate use of dietary supplements and popular diets, will be evaluated.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 215 
  
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    KINES 450 - Select Topics


    1-4 credit(s)
    Study of a particular topic in the field of Kinesiology selected by the instructor and approved by the Kinesiology Department. May or may not include lab/practical activity. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
  
  
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    KINES 473 - Adult Fitness Practicum: Boxer Boot Camp


    2 credit(s)
    A supervised practical experience working with adults in an exercise setting. Boxer Boot Camp is a Pacific University faculty/staff exercise program. Students contribute to individualized program design and serve as fitness leaders for participants. Previously Listed As: EXMB 413 Pass/No Pass.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): KINES 215  or EXIP 281, KINES 325  or EXIP 385, and KINES 383  or EXMB 313, all with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 475 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    Off-campus educational field experience tailored to academic/career goals, where students carefully and thoughtfully apply content from coursework to the situation in which they are engaged. Students must complete arrangements and secure all necessary confirmation an absolute minimum of 2 weeks prior to the term in which internship work will occur. Internship contract required.
    Prerequisite(s): 12 credits of upper-division KINES with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    KINES 495 - Independent Research


    1-4 credit(s)
    Faculty supervised, student-conducted research activities. Independent study contract required. May be repeated for credit with new/continuing projects.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s Consent.
  
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    KINES 498 - Capstone: In Progress


    0 credit(s)
    This course is to be taken during any term in which a Kinesiology major is working on, but not finishing the senior capstone project.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s Consent.
  
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    KINES 499 - Senior Capstone


    2 credit(s)
    This is the culmination of the Kinesiology capstone. Students are expected to complete and disseminate outcomes via poster, presentation, or manuscript by the end of the term. This course will typically be taken in the last term of attendance. Previously Listed As: EXIP 499
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s Consent required.

Master of Healthcare Administration

  
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    MHA 510 - Policy, Regulation, & Politics of HC


    3 credit(s)
    This course examines how health policy and politics at national, state, and local levels influence access to, cost, and quality of healthcare. Students will be introduced to a variety of health issues and related policy concepts and ideas as well as the government institutions, decision-making processes, and political actors which create health policy in the United States. The primary focus of this course will be to familiarize students with the sociopolitical environment influencing national health policy development including coverage of: health care financing, economics, and administration; health system structure; healthcare reform; the role of public opinion and special interest groups; and political leadership. Specific policy issues which substantively influence health services delivery in Oregon also will be discussed.
  
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    MHA 515 - Managing Human Res & Diversity in HC


    3 credit(s)
    This course focuses on human resources management in healthcare organizations with a strong emphasis on diversity, personnel administration, and labor relations. Students will cover a variety of topics including: recruitment and retention of clinicians; behavioral implications of the legal-regulatory environment; compensation and benefits; economic, cultural and technical forces that affect the management of healthcare employees; conflict resolution; the importance of staff training and career development; and employee morale. The course examines the regulations governing human resources management including occupational safety and health, fair employment practices, wrongful termination, and privacy issues. Students also will learn about organizational theory and behavior, personnel and labor relations laws, and how to analyze human resources/labor relations issues and effectively manage problems and build strong supervisory practices.
  
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    MHA 525 - Community Health/Managerial Epidemiology


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides students with skills and experience in applying analytical techniques to manage population health. Students will learn epidemiologic concepts, methods, and strategies that can be applied to health planning and healthcare management. The primary focus of the course is on understanding the determinants of health, the measurement of health and disease, cultural beliefs and how they impact community health, emerging trends and issues in disease patterns, and community health resource allocation. The course also will cover the use of epidemiologic methods and data to make managerial decisions, including the roles and responsibilities of health project managers; risk perception and motivation; crisis management; social marketing and health promotion; and the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in analyzing population health/disease data and supporting health promotion and disease prevention.
  
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    MHA 530 - Negotiation & Conflict Resolution


    2 credit(s)
    This course introduces students to the theory and practice of negotiation and conflict resolution including how to recognize situations that call for bargaining, what the process of bargaining involves, and how to analyze, plan, and implement successful negotiations. Emphasis will be placed on integrating analytical skills, negotiation techniques, and conflict resolution methods into the practice of health care management. Case studies, discussion, and role playing will help students build substantive skills in conflict resolution and negotiations. Students also will learn the overt and covert causes of conflict, the concepts for analyzing disputes, and a variety of methods that can be applied to effectively prevent or resolve conflict.
  
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    MHA 550 - Quality Management Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    This course examines the definition of healthcare quality from the perspectives of patients and families, providers, insurers, policy makers, and government regulators, and clarifies the relationship between healthcare quality and organizational performance measurement. Students will be introduced to the rationale for performance management and the role of the governing body of the healthcare organization in ensuring compliance with the standards of regulatory and accreditation organizations. Students also will learn how to apply the various methodologies and tools for measuring quality performance in process and outcomes management, and will understand the importance of statistical applications to measure outcomes and how to apply these applications.
  
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    MHA 601 - Intro Leadership in Healthcare & Ethics


    2 credit(s)
    This course focuses on leadership styles within organizations, exploring the relationships between different approaches to leadership in a variety of contemporary organizational contexts. Understanding the leadership process and development of self-awareness and skills necessary to lead will be emphasized. Particular attention will be placed on the ethical considerations of the decision-making process and management of major strategic and organizational change initiatives. Students will learn how to grapple with the ethical issues related to administrative and biomedical problems resulting from financial constraints, advances in technology, and the market-driven model of healthcare delivery. Case studies, discussion, role playing, and guest speakers will provide students with fresh insights into the roles, challenges, and critical decision-making skills of executives in regard to such issues as mergers and acquisitions, consolidations, restructuring, practice management, strategic planning, technology use, and e-commerce.
  
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    MHA 605 - Healthcare Management Strategies


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of the management strategies that are typically used by healthcare administrators in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Students will examine the organizational structure of the various components of the healthcare delivery system including administrative processes such as planning, decision making, evidence-based practice, productivity processes, and continuous quality improvement. Students also will learn to identify strategic issues in complex environments and how to formulate effective responses. Emphasis will be placed on the major issues confronting healthcare administrators today and how to improve resource allocation within the organization to create essential value and quality in service delivery.
  
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    MHA 610 - Organizational Behavior HC Systems


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a detailed perspective regarding how healthcare decision makers manage an organization to achieve strategic initiatives and the impact of decision-making on the behavior of people within healthcare organizations. Focus will be placed on the understanding and real-world application of the foundational concepts, principles, and models associated with organizational theory. This course draws on behavioral, social, and organizational sciences to analyze effective administration of healthcare institutions. Topics will include motivation, group behavior, leadership, conflict management, decision-making, power, organizational structure, business ethics, managing change, and communication within organizations. Analytical, integrative, and decision-making skills of students will be developed through case study analysis, discussion and role playing.
  
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    MHA 615 - Strategic Planning & Marketing


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides in-depth coverage of strategic planning concepts related to the budgeting process, and explains how marketing strategies and tactics emerge from the planning process and provide competitive opportunities for healthcare organizations. The course will focus on basic marketing concepts such as pricing, placement, product, and promotion which are essential to constructing and implementing an effective marketing strategy. Other topics include market research, product strategy, branding, multi-cultural marketing, promotional decision making, and crisis communications. Analysis of concepts central to the creation of competitive planning and marketing strategies will be discussed with special emphasis on the effective measurement of service area needs and social marketing concepts.
  
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    MHA 620 - Healthcare Operations Mgmt


    3 credit(s)
    This course will explore the applications of operations management theory within the framework of healthcare organizations. Topics to be covered will include: systems theory, waiting lines and queuing theory, quality assurance, project management, facility location and design, health information management systems, work design and productivity, forecasting, and simulation. Focus will be placed on a variety of healthcare delivery system models including hospitals, outpatient treatment facilities, medical-group practices, managed care organizations, and long-term care facilities. Issues regarding supply management, scheduling, productivity, cost performance, and quality assurance also will be discussed.
  
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    MHA 625 - Intro Healthcare Accounting & Finance


    4 credit(s)
    This course offers an overview of healthcare financial management to build competencies in business and analytical principles, and learn how to keep healthcare organizations financially viable. Basic financial accounting concepts will provide an organization-level understanding of the language, concepts, processes, and key functions of financial management. Managerial accounting principles also will be a focus of the course and include cost accounting, budgeting at the department level, and an understanding of the key role that budget development, budget management, and fiscal control play in ensuring the financial strength of healthcare organizations. Topics will include: an overview of the healthcare system from a financial viewpoint; the healthcare revenue cycle; financial statement analysis; management of working capital; financial literacy; the time value of money and investment decision models; funding sources and debt financing; long-term capital structure; mergers and acquisitions; analyzing financial statements; cost management; legal and regulatory issues; accounting for inflation; and decision analysis techniques. Students will apply a variety of methods including case study analysis, excel spreadsheet modeling, group problem solving, and the application of a Department Manager’s Toolkit to demonstrate competence in concepts and methods.
  
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    MHA 630 - Healthcare Finance


    3 credit(s)
    This course offers an introduction to and an analysis of selected accounting issues and will provide students with an understanding of the basics of financial and managerial accounting principles and their application to healthcare organizations. The course will build basic knowledge of cost accounting, including full and differential costing techniques, and will focus on management control structures and processes, also addressing topics such as budgeting, reporting, and variance analysis. Particular attention will be given to healthcare accounting practices. By the end of the course, it is intended that non-financial managers of healthcare institutions will understand and appreciate the financial implications of operational and strategic management decision making.
  
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    MHA 635 - Managing Information in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    This course focuses on the critical role of Management Information Systems (MIS) in the planning, operations, and management of healthcare organizations, and is designed to provide students with a macro-level understanding of information technology and how it can be used to gain business and operational efficiencies in healthcare service delivery. Topics addressed will include strategic and project planning for Management Information Systems; HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) and other confidentiality requirements regarding patient information; coding and informatics standards; electronic medical records; Internet applications; and the organization of information management functions within healthcare organizations.
  
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    MHA 640 - Legal Aspects of Healthcare Management


    3 credit(s)
    This course covers a broad range of legal issues relevant to healthcare management and the administrative aspects of laws that are important to organizational managers. It is designed to provide students with insights into how the legal system works, how lawyers analyze problems, and how healthcare administrators interact with the legal system and lawyers. The course will introduce students to a wide range of contemporary healthcare topics including how common medical errors continue to plague the healthcare system and negatively impact the reputations and financial well-being of healthcare providers, organizations, and the health and lives of patients.
  
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    MHA 645 - Innovative HC Management


    2 credit(s)
    Provides students with a broad understanding of the most current approaches to innovative/disruptive strategies in business and specifically healthcare management. Topics to be covered include: creativity and the characteristics of innovators, the role of organizational leadership in growth and innovation, how to manage strategy development, the role of disruptive technology, and how to disrupt the healthcare business model. The research of Clayton Christensen also will be covered.
    Offered: Offered in Summer.

  
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    MHA 650 - Health Services Research & Project Mgt


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides students with broad understanding of health services research methodologies, and the foundational elements of social sciences research, and how these can be applied effectively to the healthcare administrator’s decision-making processes through evidence-based practice. Students will apply this knowledge through the development of a comprehensive review of the literature and development of a capstone proposal. Students also will learn the various tools utilized in project management, and build the skills necessary to effectively participate in health services research and project management by applying these skills to various healthcare settings. Oral presentations of project proposals will be required.
  
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    MHA 675 - Internship


    0-9 credit(s)
    Students are required to complete a minimum of two of MHA 675 (1 equals 90 hours), if the student has less than two years of work experience in the field of healthcare. Under the supervision of a site preceptor and a MHA faculty member, students engage in various applied projects with healthcare organizations.
  
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    MHA 680 - Independent Study


    0-9 credit(s)
    Students work with program faculty independently to determine the focus of specific course content to expand understanding of a content area of interest to the student’s individual professional growth in the field of healthcare administration. The student is required to submit an independent study proposal and receive faculty approval.
  
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    MHA 685 - Applied Research Project


    0-9 credit(s)
    Students work with program faculty and sometimes a healthcare organization site preceptor to design and implement an applied research project within a healthcare organization. Preparation of an applied research proposal is required.
  
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    MHA 691 - Capstone Integrative Seminar I


    1-2 credit(s)
    The first semester of a two-semester course where students focus on the integration of practical knowledge and the application of theories, models, and techniques from preceding courses, applying these to specific operational issues in the field of healthcare management. This first course provides students with the opportunity to develop and present their initial research proposals for their year-long capstone projects to MHA faculty and peers, receive critical feedback, and evaluate the capstone research proposals of other students. Case studies, discussion, and group learning will highlight a variety of topics including population health, social marketing, human resources management, financial planning and operations, health policy, and healthcare ethics related to the development, implementation, and evaluation of applied projects in healthcare management. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first two semesters of the MHA curriculum.
  
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    MHA 692 - Capstone Integrative Seminar II


    1-2 credit(s)
    A continuation of MHA 691  where students focus on the integration of practical knowledge and the application of theories, models, and techniques from preceding courses, applying these to specific operational issues in the field of healthcare management. This final course in the MHA curriculum provides students with the opportunity to present the results of their year-long capstone research projects to MHA faculty, healthcare organization managers and peers, receive critical feedback, and evaluate the work of other students. Case studies, discussion and group learning will highlight a variety of topics including population health, social marketing, human resources management, financial planning and operations, health policy, and healthcare ethics related to the development, implementation, and evaluation of applied projects in healthcare management. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): MHA 691 .
  
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    MHA 699 - Special Topics


    1-9 credit(s)
    See department for details.

Mathematics

  
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    MATH 122 - College Algebra


    4 credit(s)
    Offers students the opportunity to polish their general algebra skills in preparation for precalculus, statistics and other courses where a working knowledge of algebra without trigonometry is a prerequisite. Throughout the course, students are asked to translate information back and forth between grammatical and mathematical forms. Topics include modeling, graphing, and analysis with linear, quadratic and general polynomial expressions, solving linear, quadratic and general polynomial equations and inequalities and functions.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 122L  
  
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    MATH 122L - College Algebra Lab


    0 credit(s)
    This course is the lab component of MATH 122  - College Algebra. Students will work on various activities related to course content in an online environment supported by their instructor and/or teaching assistants.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 122  
  
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    MATH 125 - Precalculus


    4 credit(s)
    Most science and mathematics courses require that students be comfortable working with functions symbolically, graphically, and numerically. Precalculus offers students the background they need to pursue these courses. An integral component of the course is translating information back and forth between grammatical and mathematical forms. Concentrating on functions and their properties, the course includes the study of several classes of functions including polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. The conic sections are also studied.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 122  with a minimum grade of C or placement.
  
  
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    MATH 165 - Modern Topics in Mathematics


    4 credit(s)
    This course exposes students to abstraction and problem solving with mathematical constructs. Elements of descriptive and inferential statistics give students the foundation to understand visual and numerical representations of data and to make informed judgments about survey and experimental study results. Various topics chosen from among management science, finance, voting theory, game theory, symmetry, proportionality, or other modern topics offer the opportunity to see connections of mathematics to business, political science, art and other fields.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    MATH 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    MATH 206 - Computational Linear Algebra


    4 credit(s)
    This course is intended as an introduction to Linear Algebra with emphasis on the computational aspects of the material. Topics will include vectors, matrix algebra, determinants, solving systems of linear equations, Gaussian elimination, matrix factorization, eigenvalues/eigenvectors, diagonalization, and singular value decomposition. Additional topics may include principle component analysis, least squares regression, and gradient method of steepest descent. This course will include programming assignments in MATLAB, R, and/or other computer algebra systems.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C (may be taken concurrently) or Math placement III or higher.
  
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    MATH 207 - General Elementary Statistics


    4 credit(s)
    This course covers the basic theory and practice of descriptive and inferential statistics including the presentation and structure of data sets, histograms, correlation, and regression analysis. Sampling distributions, binomial, normal, and chi-square probability distributions, confidence intervals, estimation, and hypothesis testing including t-tests and analysis of variance will also be discussed. Includes an introduction to a statistical software package.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 122  with a minimum grade of C or placement.
  
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    MATH 212 - Language and Logic


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of formal syntactic and semantic features of language, including topics such as sentential logic, predicate logic, axiomatic systems and set theory, and nonclassical extensions such as multivalued logics. Also listed as PHIL 212 .
    Offered: Offered annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    MATH 221 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers I


    4 credit(s)
    Designed for future elementary teachers. Elements of logic, numeration, the number systems of arithmetic, elementary number theory, the algorithms of arithmetic, introductory concepts of statistics and probability.
    Offered: Alternate years 2014-2015

  
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    MATH 223 - Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II


    4 credit(s)
    Designed for future elementary teachers. Intuitive geometry in two and three dimensions, systems of measurement, estimation and approximation.
    Offered: Alternate years 2015-2016

  
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    MATH 226 - Calculus I


    4 credit(s)
    The study of functions and their rates of change. Topics include the concept of derivative as rate of change, limits and continuity, differentiation and its applications, Intermediate, Extreme and Mean Value Theorems, introduction to integrals, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 125  with a minimum grade of C or placement.
  
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    MATH 227 - Calculus II


    4 credit(s)
    Investigation of single variable integration including techniques of symbolic integration, numerical integration and error analysis, applications of integration, and improper integrals. Infinite sequences, infinite series, and Taylor series will be introduced.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C or placement
  
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    MATH 228 - Calculus III


    4 credit(s)
    The study of calculus of several variables. Topics include visualization techniques, vectors and solid analytic geometry, vector arithmetic, partial differentiation and its applications, gradients, optimization techniques, iterated integrals, line integrals, divergence, curl and related theorems.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 240 - Discrete Mathematics


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces the fundamentals of number systems, sets, functions and relations, logic and proof, elementary combinatorics, Boolean algebra and graph theory. It plays the role of a transition course for mathematics majors, moving them from calculus to the upper division courses in mathematics, and as an important course in logic for computer science majors.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C or placement.
  
  
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    MATH 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    MATH 300 - Mentoring in Mathematics


    1-2 credit(s)
    Math mentors will staff sections of MATH 122L, providing tutelage, recording attendance, and assisting the MATH 122 instructor with monitoring student progress and developing personalized educational interventions. Mentors meet weekly with the instructor to discuss assigned readingson pedagogy and peer mentorship, and may hold exam review sessions. Mentors do not participate in course grading. Mentors are selected by an application process. This course does not contribute to satisfying a student’s Mathematics core requirement or to the upper-division credit requirement within the mathematics major. Instructor’s Consent required. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    MATH 301 - Mathematical Modeling


    4 credit(s)
    A wide variety of physical and social systems can be described and analyzed using mathematics. In this course, students will learn about the mathematical modeling process through examination and analysis of frequently used models in physics, chemistry, biology and other sciences. Students will also experience generating and testing new models.
    Offered: Offered alternate years

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C or placement
  
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    MATH 306 - Linear Algebra


    4 credit(s)
    Systems of linear equations, vector spaces, dependence, basis, dimension, linear transformations, determinants, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, orthogonal matrices, curves of best fit, quadratic forms. Attention to computational, and graphical applications and argumentation.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  and MATH 240  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 307 - Calculus-Based Statistics


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to applied statistical methods used throughout the natural and social sciences. Topics include graphical analysis of data, discrete and continuous random variables, PDFs and CDFs, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, simple linear regression, and tests of statistical significance.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 311 - Ordinary Differential Equations


    4 credit(s)
    Topics include the theory of linear equations, investigations of non-linear equations, systems of equations, numerical methods, stability, long-term behavior and Laplace transforms. Emphasis is placed on both quantitative and qualitative descriptions of solutions and applications.
    Offered: Offered alternate years 2014-2016.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 316 - Mathematical Probability and Statistics


    4 credit(s)
    This course covers the fundamentals of mathematical probability and statistics, including the axioms of probability, conditional probability, discrete and continuous random variables, multivariate distributions, moment generating functions, the binomial, geometric, Poisson, normal, and exponential distributions and the Central Limit Theorem. Additional topics from statistical inference theory such as order statistics, confidence intervals, and Chi-Square tests in addition to estimation of parameters using maximum likelihood methods will also be covered as time permits.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227   (may be taken concurrently) and MATH 240  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 321 - Higher Geometry


    4 credit(s)
    A rigorous study of both Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 240  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 326 - Introduction to Analysis


    4 credit(s)
    Provides a transition from calculus to real and complex analysis. Focuses on rigorous development of fundamental concepts in calculus including limits, convergence of sequences and series, compact sets, continuity, uniform continuity and differentiability of functions.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227  and MATH 240  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
  
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    MATH 360 - Special Topics in Mathematics


    4 credit(s)
    The topic of this course will change from year to year, and will depend on the interests and judgment of the math department faculty. Examples of topics may include the history of mathematics, dynamical systems, foundations and logic, mathematical biology, topology, graph theory, number theory, and differential geometry. May be repeated once for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 240  with a minimum grade of C; additional prerequisites may apply depending on the topic.
  
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    MATH 385W - Junior Seminar


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to help students learn how to read mathematics, to communicate it through mathematical writing and speaking, and to prepare students for careers in mathematics and related fields. Students will read and present two journal articles. Contents will further include the mathematical writing package Latex and presentation software Beamer, as well as career planning and graduate school preparation. Students will also attend mathematical colloquia and mathematics projects presented during senior project day.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits); a declared Math major or 6 credits of upper-division MATH with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    MATH 400 - Number Theory


    4 credit(s)
    Studies the theory of numbers with an emphasis on algebraic structures. Topics may include modular arithmetic, quadratic fields, Pell’s equations, quadratic reciprocity, sums of squares, unit groups, factorization in number rings, ideals, diophantine equations, and the geometry of numbers.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 306  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 402 - Abstract Algebra


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of fundamental concepts in abstract algebra. Topics may include Group theory, including quotient groups, fundamental results on group homomorphisms and the study of finite groups; Ring theory, including fundamental homomorphism theorems, quotient rings and Euclidean rings, vector spaces and modules; Field theory including field extensions, Galois theory and classical results concerning constructability and solvability.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 240  and MATH 306  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 405 - Real Analysis


    4 credit(s)
    A rigorous treatment of the limit concept, continuity, differentiation and integration. Sequence and series convergence. Uniform and pointwise convergence of sequence and series of functions.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 326  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 410 - Discrete Topics


    4 credit(s)
    This course will provide advanced study of a topic in discrete mathematics. Topics may include graph theory, combinatorics, discrete optimization, or set theory.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227  and MATH 240  with a minimum grade of C; or take MATH 306  with a minimum grade of C; other prerequisites as required by the topic.
  
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    MATH 411 - Partial Differential Equations


    4 credit(s)
    Addresses solution methods for the three basic partial differential equations of mathematical physics: the heat, wave and potential equations. Methods covered will include power series, Fourier series, Laplace transform methods, separation of variables, and the method of characteristics. Initial and boundary data will also be covered, as well as physical applications and numerical simulations of solutions. Special topics as time permits.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 228  and MATH 311  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 412 - Complex Analysis


    4 credit(s)
    Complex numbers, analytic functions, elementary functions, mapping by elementary functions, integrals, series, residues and poles, conformal mapping.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 228  and MATH 240  both with a minimum grade of C.
  
  
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    MATH 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    MATH 490 - Senior Capstone


    1 credit(s)
    Students will have the opportunity to use their mathematical skills and knowledge to investigate projects in collaboration with faculty in mathematics. The project will result in a final paper and senior capstone presentation.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed), a declared Mathematics major, and 9 of upper division MATH courses with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 492W - Senior Capstone II


    1 credit(s)
    This is a continuation of MATH 490 .
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 490  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    MATH 495 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.

Media Arts

  
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    MEDA 101 - Fundamentals of Speaking


    2 credit(s)
    This course includes study of communication theory and the preparation and delivery of speeches. Students are expected to give a number of relatively short speeches before the class. Emphasis is on the development of speaking skills before an audience.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
  
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    MEDA 108 - Fundamentals of Sports Communication


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an introduction to the field of sport communication and communication practices within the context of teams, athletics programs, and related organizations. The course will emphasize the understanding of communicating in various settings including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and in mass media where the subject matter relates to athletic endeavors and competition. Students will explore the evolution of sports communication strategies, theories, and the mass media, along with how sport communication is important within social, international, and personal perspectives.
  
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    MEDA 109 - Introduction to Graphic Design


    2 credit(s)
    Students will explore the many ways in which design is used to enhance meaning, add value, and achieve desired outcomes with print and electronic communications while becoming conversant in many fundamental principles and techniques in the field of graphic design. Also listed under ARTST 109 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    MEDA 110 - Introduction to Communication


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the study of human communication. Communication principles will be applied to interpersonal, small group, public, organizational and mass media contexts.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-2017 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    MEDA 112 - Media in Society


    4 credit(s)
    What is the relationship between media industry and media content? How does popular culture articulate cultural beliefs and practices? How do we analyze and interpret the media industries? This course is designed to equip students with the key concepts, theories, and methods to undertake their own critical analyses of media and the industries that make them.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts or Humanities.
  
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    MEDA 116 - Graphic Design I


    4 credit(s)
    In this introductory course, students will explore the many ways in which graphic design is used to enhance meaning, add value, and achieve desired outcomes with print and electronic communications. Using professional software applications, students will become conversant in many fundamental principles and techniques in the field of graphic design. Previously Listed As: MEDA 216.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Processes.
  
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    MEDA 120 - Film History and Analysis


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces the study of film by examining its history. Film movements, national cinemas, the development of technology, the evolution of the industry, and major directors are areas that are explored. Additionally, the course will introduce the student to film analysis by examining how the film’s narrative form works in tandem with mise en scene, editing, cinematography and sound to create meaning. The course is international in scope and regular screenings are included. 4 hours plus additional fil
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    MEDA 121 - Our Digital World


    2 credit(s)
    An exploration of the impact and effects of the Internet on all aspects of our lives as global citizens. This course examines the ethical, cultural, economic and political aspects of the Internet as a social technology.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
 

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