Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 101 - Intro to ASL Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    An introductory course to American Sign Language and Deaf culture. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency to the ACTFL Novice Mid level through comprehensible input, and also on involvement in the Deaf community. Attendance to five Deaf community events is required for this course.
  
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    ASL 102 - Intro to ASL Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    An introductory level course to American Sign Language and Deaf culture that continues instruction from ASL 101. Emphasis is placed on developing proficiency to the ACTFL Novice High level through comprehensible input, and also on involvement in the Deaf community. Attendance to five Deaf community events is required for this course.
    Prerequisite(s): ASL 101  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ASL 201 - Intermediate American Sign Language


    4 credit(s)
    Intermediate level course on American Sign Language and Deaf culture that continues instruction from ASL 102. Emphasis is placed on further developing proficiency to the ACTFL Intermediate Low level, and also on involvement in the Deafcommunity. Attendance to five Deaf community events is required for this course.
    Prerequisite(s): ASL 102  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ASL 202 - Intermediate American Sign Language


    4 credit(s)
    An intermediate level course on American Sign Language and Deaf culture that continues instruction from ASL 201. Emphasis is placed on further developing proficiency to the ACTFL Intermediate Low level, and also on involvement in the Deaf community. Attendance to five Deaf community events is required for this course.
    Prerequisite(s): ASL 201  with a minimum grade of C-.
  

Anthropology

  
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    ANTH 101 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the methods, theories, and history of cultural anthropology investigating the comparative study of human societies in all their remarkable complexity and diversity. A special mandate of the field is to discover new and less harmful ways of perceiving and understanding the different experiences, practices, histories, and values of people and communities from all parts of the world. This course is designed to examine the ways people within a range of societies make sense of and order their lives. It emphasizes that other possibilities, beyond the ones with which we are most familiar, exist for solving problems and for achieving meaningful lives.
    Offered: Offered annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior
  
  
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    ANTH 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ANTH 203 - Contemporary Pacific Studies


    4 credit(s)
    Oceania is a region of extraordinary cultural diversity, including Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. The Pacific has long been an object of European interest being imagined as a serene, exotic, and savage paradise. These images reflect Western desires and discourses, and counter everyday life in the Pacific Islands. This course will explore the relationship between western and local/indigenous representations of culture while also focusing on the dynamics of social life and transformations associated with de/colonization and globalization in the Pacific.
    Offered: Offered triennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ANTH 206 - Sex, Gender, Culture


    4 credit(s)
    In all societies, people organize social relationships and identities, ideologies and symbolic systems, in terms of gender and sexuality, but they do so in different ways. In this course, we will examine the ways in which individuals and societies imagine, experience, impose and challenge gender and sexuality systems in a diversty of cultural contexts, including those of the United States, Oceania, Africa, and Asia. One of the aims throughout the course will be to explore other societies as a means of better understanding and critiquing our own.
    Offered: Offered triennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives, International Perspective, and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): GSS 201 , ANTH 101 , SOC 101, SOC 102, SOC 110 , SOC 120 , or SOC 130 .
  
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    ANTH 207 - Good Food: Eating & Community


    4 credit(s)
    People give meaning to the consumption, distribution, and production of food and its effects on bodies in ways that define the appropriate social relationships in the world. This course explores how societies build connections between what we eat and who we are and between definitions of good food as linked to definitions of a good society and a good life. We will discuss how people define themselves and their cultures via food production, distribution, preparation, and consumption. This class will also critically examine food systems at local and global levels.
    Offered: Offered triennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , PH 101 , SOC 101, SOC 102, SOC 110 , SOC 120 , or SOC 130 .
  
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    ANTH 240 - Comparative Religions


    4 credit(s)
    Comparative study of major world and selected regional religions with an emphasis on the analysis of beliefs, rituals, symbolism and social organization. Also listed as REL 240 . May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirements: International and Diverse Perspectives, and Historical Context.
  
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    ANTH 241 - Introduction to World Music


    4 credit(s)
    Through lecture, discussion, structured listening and participation, students will explore various music cultures throughout the world including those in Japan, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Africa, Indonesia and India. In addition, the course includes an examination of Afro-American and Native American music as well as other less commonly known North American forms and genres. Also listed as MUS 241 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International perspectives.
  
  
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    ANTH 268 - Trinidad Culture & Society


    4 credit(s)
    Designed to prepare students for travel to Trinidad and Tobago in the Winter Term (ANTH 368 /SOCWK 368 ). The course covers various features of Trinidad and Tobago’s history from its early imperial encounter to its present post-colonial condition. Additionally, the class covers contemporary culture and local and global political economy. Perhaps most importantly, the course requires students to create a research project to be implemented as field research in Trinidad and Tobago. In this sense, the course is preparation for what anthropologists and social workers would refer to as a ‘field methods’ class. For this element of the class, students must create a research project, conduct preliminary textual and internet research, and begin making contacts in Trinidad and Tobago. Students therefore must be fully prepared at the end of this course to conduct self-directed, ethnographic research in Trinidad and Tobago. Also listed as SOCWK 268 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years during Fall.

  
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    ANTH 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ANTH 295 - Independent Study


    1-6 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ANTH 299 - Field Experience


    1-2 credit(s)
    A course for students who wish to combine anthropology and their service learning experiences through the Humanitarian Center. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    ANTH 302W - Designing Ethnography


    2 credit(s)
    One of the aims of anthropology is “to grasp the native’s point of view, his relation to life, to realize his vision of his world.” Anthropologists employ many strategies, methods, and approaches to understand this point of view and related cultural context. This class is designed to give students hands-on experience with research design and qualitative methods as well as build awareness around the benefits and limitations of such methods. The course begins with an introduction to ethnography as a way of collecting empirical data and as a way of thinking. We then explore specific methods, while students develop their own research proposals and IRBs.
    Offered: Annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior; Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits) and ANTH 101 , SOC 110 , SOC 120 , or SOC 130 
  
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    ANTH 311 - Medicine, Body and Culture


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to critical areas of inquiry in medical anthropology. By examining the socio-cultural dimensions of sickness and healing cross-culturally, we will explore how anthropologists have approached historical and contemporary problems in the global field of medicine. While our course trajectory will lead us to treat Western biomedicine as only one among many systems of meaning and authority, we will also spend some time deconstructing the often unspoken assumptions that govern this field, thereby complicating the notion that the latter is somehow insulated from the reach of culture. We also will focus on issues of power, inequality, and gender and health. Also listed as GSS 311  and PH 311  .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Diverse Perspectives, and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , GSS 201 , SOC-101, SOC 316   or PH 101 .
  
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    ANTH 313 - Religion & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    An anthropological and sociological analysis of religious practice, including belief, ritual, experience, organization, and knowledge. Using interpretive strategies from anthropology, sociology, and religious studies this course investigates the origins and development of religious practice as unique social contexts and their relation to other forms of social life.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above.
  
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    ANTH 317 - Pop Culture: Cultural Studies


    4 credit(s)
    Using theories drawn from the school of Cultural Studies as well as what has come to be known as “critical theory”, this course takes an intensive analysis of the many artifacts of popular culture. A central goal of the course is to understand how the artifacts we analyze reflect, respond to, shape, and are shaped by the broader social/cultural forces around them. Also listed as SOC 317 .
    Offered: Offered annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts (AIT).
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , SOC 101, SOC 102, SOC 110 , SOC 120 , or SOC 130 .
  
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    ANTH 343 - Food, Fat, and Fitness


    4 credit(s)
    The United States is a culture obsessed with food, fat, and fitness. As efforts to reduce obesity increase, rates of obesity actually increase. Why is that? This anthropology course depends heavily on interdisciplinary perspectives to explore the connections between body size and culture, examining food, fat, and fitness not just as public health issues but as culturally and historically constructed categories related to gender, race, sexuality, and class. While we will explore biocultural approaches to obesity, this course is not a biomedical study of the “obesity epidemic.” Instead we examine the discourses and vocabulary used to describe this current “crisis.” Also listed as GSS 343  and PH 343 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , GSS 201 , SOC 101, SOC 316 , or PH 101 .
  
  
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    ANTH 368 - Trinidad Culture & Society: Travel


    2 credit(s)
    Travel course to Trinidad and Tobago. The class is designed so that students are, in many ways, the primary architects of their travel experience. They design their own research projects, set goals for conducting and completing their projects, meet with Trinidadians they contacted themselves, and analyze the data they collected. In essence then, this course serves as a field methods class in Social Science, though open to all majors. The course blends scientific methods, critical philosophical inquiry, and literary writing practices to help students become creative and critical thinkers as well as internationally engaged and aware citizens. Also listed as SOCWK 368 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years during Winter.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 268  or SOCWK 268 .
  
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    ANTH 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ANTH 402W - Writing Ethnography


    4 credit(s)
    This course involves the study and practice of the complex craft of writing and evaluating ethnography. Students will read, analyze, and critique ethnographies in conjunction with the critical review and analysis of influential social, literary, and ethnographic theories while writing their own ethnographies. The production of an ethnography, involving primary field research, a literature review, and social/cultural analysis is a crucial component of the course.
    Offered: Annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 302W  and Junior Standing.
  
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    ANTH 412 - Ethnography Lab: Senior Capstone


    2 credit(s)
    Students will complete their senior thesis projects in Ethnography Lab. The course will focus on presenting findings and projects in multiple formats including through social media, journalism, as well as ethnography. Emphasis will be placed on peer-feedback and discussion.
    Offered: Offered Annually.

    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 402W , or 4 credits of ANTH 451 .
  
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    ANTH 450 - Directed Research in Anthropology


    1-4 credit(s)
    Directed Research in Anthropology allows students of advanced standing to participate in a research project with an anthropology faculty member in order to gain practical experience in the conduct of ongoing professional-level sociological research. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit, up to 6 credits total.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    ANTH 451 - Directed Research: Capstone


    1-4 credit(s)
    Directed Research: Capstone allows students of advanced standing to participate in a research project with an ANTH faculty member in order to gain practical experience in the conduct of ongoing professional-level ANTH research. Participation in this research will count towards the students’ capstone requirement in the major. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits). Instructor’s consent required.
  
  
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    ANTH 468 - Anthropology Mentor


    1-4 credit(s)
    Allows students with strong ethnographic methods training to serve as mentors in Anthropology courses. Students who enroll in this course will work closely with Anthropology faculty to develop activities for courses that teach critical ethnographic methods, such as participant observation, interview techniques, field note taking, and data analysis. Mentors will also work closely with students to help them create
    ethnographic research projects in relevant courses. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    ANTH 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.

Applied Science

  
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    SCI 110 - PSiMS Seminar


    0 credit(s)
    Required seminar course for recipients of Pacific Scholarships in Mathematics and Sciences (PSiMS). Students will meet each week for community building, exposure to career and research opportunities, discussion of current topics in science/math and to plan an outreach event. Instructor’s Consent required. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
  
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    SCI 170 - Astronomy


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of astronomy, including the solar system, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies, cosmology, astronomical instruments, and space science. Evening observing sessions.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
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    SCI 172 - Introduction to Cosmology


    2 credit(s)
    Recent discoveries in astronomy are shedding light on some of the biggest questions we can ask: Does space go on forever, or does it have an end somewhere? Has the universe always existed, or did it have a beginning? Where does the matter that makes up our bodies come from? What will be the fate of our universe in the future? This course provides an overview of what science has to say about these kinds of questions, and an introduction to the methods used to gain this knowledge. Class discussions and assignments will help you develop your own personal perspective on how you connect to the big picture, guided by information from modern scientific cosmology.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
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    SCI 190 - Engineering Passport


    1 credit(s)
    An introduction to the fields of engineering, with an emphasis on the methods of problems solving and the nature of employment in these fields. Course activities include presentations, discussions, guest lectures, field trips, and problem-solving exercises.
  
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    SCI 200 - Material Science for Makers


    2 credit(s)
    Through the lens of cultural values, this interdisciplinary course introduces students to relationships between art, craft, design, and science as applied to processes and materials used for the production of functional objects such as tools, tableware, and clothing. Throughout history, scientific and empirical approaches have been used outside of the laboratory by artisans and craftspeople to improve our food, tools, and shelters for the benefit of our health and well-being. In this course, students will use the scientific method in their work as they explore how science and culture inform and influence our choices and treatment of physical materials used to make the things we need. We will evaluate these choices for their utility and investigate the materials and processes of making using the scientific frameworks of physics and chemistry. We will also assess methods of production while considering issues of sustainability and environmental stewardship. Using Japanese culture as a unifying thread through lecture, reading, written reflection, and hand’s on making, students will explore attitudes towards consumption and the science behind the processes of making objects of use in indigenous, traditional, and industrial cultures. Through the course of the semester, students will complete a simple sheath knife, a raku tea bowl, and a shibori-dyed article of clothing. The course will be team taught by faculty from both the School of Natural Sciences and the School of Humanities.
    Corequisite(s): HUM 200 .
  
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    SCI 201 - Material Science for Makers


    2 credit(s)
    Material Science for Makers, SCI 201, is part of a two-course interdisciplinary experience (SCI 201 and ARTST 201  ) that introduces students to relationships between art, craft, design, and science as applied to processes and materials used for the production of functional objects such as tools, tableware, and clothing. In SCI 201, students will use the scientific method as they conduct experiments and explore how science and culture inform and influence the choices and treatment of physical materials used to make the things we need. We will evaluate these choices for their utility and investigate the materials and processes of production using the scientific frameworks of physics and chemistry. We will also assess methods of production while considering issues of sustainability and environmental stewardship. Through experiment, lecture, reading, and written reflection, students will explore the science behind the processes of making materials and objects such as ceramic bowls, steel knives, and dyed textiles. The course will be taught by faculty from the School of Natural Sciences.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Corequisite(s): ARTST 201  
  
  
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    SCI 295 - Independent Study


    1 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  
  
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    SCI 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    SCI 490 - Applied Science Senior Capstone


    2 credit(s)
    Serves as the capstone course and project for students majoring in Applied Science. Students will design and complete a capstone project that includes independent study and analysis of experimental or scientific literature. Examples of acceptable projects include a focused review of the literature that results in an original interpretation of novel applications; a pedagogical project for students interested in pursuing a career in teaching; a project based on community service that uses innovative application of scientific principles and technology; an internship at a government laboratory or an industrial site. All projects culminate in a written paper, and public presentation. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing, declared Applied Science major, and 14 of relevant upper division coursework.
  
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    SCI 495 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.

Art History

  
  
  
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    ARTHI 260 - History of Design


    4 credit(s)
    Historical survey of 19th and 20th century design. Links dominant trends, theories and representative designs to their social, historic, cultural, political, technological and aesthetic context. Close analysis of individual objects are interwoven with overarching themes, including the changing role of the designer in society, production processes, materials, the role of the body in design, and the significance of design in culture and society. Our primary concern is industrial design, but other media (furniture, ceramics, glass, etc.), exhibitions and educational institutions, as well as the impact of technology and new social uses are considered.
    Offered: Alternate years.

  
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    ARTHI 270 - Global Art History I: Prehistoric-14th Century


    4 credit(s)
    Surveys visual culture from the Prehistoric period to the 14th century. It examines major artworks, monuments, artists, and movements within diverse cultures, such as the ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Byzantine, Islam, Medieval, Mesoamerica, South and North America, and Africa. In a contextual analysis, students will explore the meanings and functions of art and architecture, focusing on the historical, religious, political, cultural, and socio-economic contexts that shaped these works. In this framework, students also learn methods and vocabulary of art analysis while expanding their knowledge of art, history, geography, politics, religion, literature, and ethnicity.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Historical Context. International & Diverse Perspectives.
  
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    ARTHI 271 - Global Art History II: 15th Century - Present


    4 credit(s)
    Surveys visual culture from the 15th century to the present. It examines major artworks, monuments, artists, and movements within diverse cultures from Europe, Mesoamerica, South and North America, Oceania, and Africa. In a contextual analysis, students will explore the meanings and functions of art and architecture, focusing on the historical, religious, political, cultural, and socio-economic contexts that shaped these works. In this framework, students also learn methods and vocabulary of art analysis while expanding their knowledge of art, history, geography, politics, religion, literature, and ethnicity.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Historical Context, International & Diverse Perspectives.
  
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    ARTHI 276 - Art & Architecture of Asia


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a selective survey of the architecture and visual arts of Asia, focusing primarily upon the artistic traditions of India, China, and Japan from prehistory to the turn of the twentieth century. Major artworks, monuments, and themes will be examined and interpreted using various analytical and contextual perspectives (such as formal, functional, iconographic, sociological, cultural, historical, political, and religious) in order to construct an understanding of their significance in an Asian cultural context.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
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    ARTHI 280 - Women, Gender, Sexuality in Art


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the representation of women, gender, and sexuality in visual culture. It examines how these constructs are relevant to the creation, patronage, and appreciation of art in various cultures in history. It places an emphasis on current discourses, including Feminist art analysis and issues of race and sexual orientation as they pertain to the artists or works being considered. Also listed as GSS 280 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    ARTHI 282 - Special Topics in Art History


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    This is a special topics course focusing on the specific interests of students and faculty, including thematic courses and in-depth studies of particular artists, movements, and cultures from throughout the history of art. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analysis and Interpretation of Texts
  
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    ARTHI 295 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ARTHI 342 - Islamic Art and Architecture


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides students with a general introduction of Islamic art and architecture from the 7th through the 18th century. It examines selected characteristic works of art and architecture from the formative periods to the later periods with distinctive regional expressions. The discussion will cover a variety of media and techniques including architecture, architectural decoration, metal work, ceramics, and the arts of the book, both from the religious and secular realms. Students will explore the meaning and functions of art created within specific religious, social, political, historical, and artistic contexts in order to understand the significance of the visual culture in the Islamic context.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ARTHI 352 - 19th Century Art


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a contextual examination of the development of painting, sculpture, photography, and other arts from the late 18th-century to the end of the 19th-century, focusing upon North American and European movements. It explores the meaning and functions of the visual arts created within specific social, political, historical, and artistic contexts. In particular, this course studies how artists responded to the developments of the 19th century that led to the rise of modernism and the avant-garde.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
  
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    ARTHI 362 - Modern Art: 1900-1960


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a contextual history of Modern art including painting, sculpture, architecture and other arts in Europe and the United States from 1900 to 1960. In particular, this course will explore the cultural influences, trends in style and expression, and comparative relationships in the visual arts using various analytical perspectives (such as formal, sociological, cultural, historical, and political) in order to understand modern art’s significant role as the foundation and impetus for contemporary art.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ARTHI 365 - Modern Art: 19th & Early 20th Century


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a contextual examination of various artistic movements that comprise 19th and early 20th century modern art in Europe and the United States. In particular, this course will explore a variety of cultural influences, trends in style and expression, and comparative relationships in the visual arts using various perspectives or contexts (such as formal, sociological, cultural, historical, and political) in order to understand modernity and modern art’s significant role as the foundation and impetus for contemporary art. It also examines various critical and theoretical models used to discuss and describe modern art.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing
  
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    ARTHI 372W - Contemporary Art History


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an in-depth investigation of the complex world of Contemporary Art since 1950. It offers a selective history of the visual art movements in Europe, America and the current international world of art. In particular, this course explores the meaning and functions of art created within specific social, political, technological, and artistic contexts. It also exams the various critical and theoretical models used to discuss and describe contemporary art, such as Formalism, Marxism, Semiotics, Feminism, Gender Studies, Psychoanalysis, Postmodernism, Sustainability, Cultural Studies, and Globalization.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts, Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and ENGW 180 , ENGW 181 , or ENGW 182 , with minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ARTHI 382 - Special Topics in Art History II


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    This is a special topics course focusing on the specific interests of students and faculty, including thematic courses and in-depth studies of particular artists and movements from throughout the history of art. May be repeated for credit as topic varies.
    Core Requirement(s): Analysis and Interpretation of Texts
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ARTHI 395 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  
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    ARTHI 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ARTHI 485 - Art History Seminar


    2-7 credit(s)
    This seminar is designed for the advanced student who wants to pursue intensive, in-depth study, culminating in a research paper on a specific art historical topic. Students study under an instructor’s supervision on their research project, and as the seminar is designed to help students create an artistic community on campus, are also required to participate in the seminar meetings. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), ARTHI 270  and ARTHI 271 .
  
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    ARTHI 493 - Senior Seminar I


    2 credit(s)
    This class is the first capstone experience for art history majors and is to be taken during the fall (first) semester of the senior year. It is devoted to the proposal, development and research needed for a substantial prospectus for the senior thesis. This senior thesis will consist of an art historical paper of significant length and quality under the supervision of at least one faculty member. Students will also read, discuss, and critique the work of other members of the seminar.
    Prerequisite(s): Declared Art History major;  ARTHI 372W  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ARTHI 494 - Senior Seminar II


    2 credit(s)
    This class is the second capstone experience for art history majors and is to be taken during the spring (or final) semester of the senior year. It is devoted to the research and completion of the senior thesis, which will consist of an art historical paper of significant length and quality under the supervision of at least one faculty member. Students will also read, discuss, and critique the work of other members of the seminar. In addition, seniors will work with the juniors in ARTHI 385 , practicing their presentations and reviewing and mentoring them with their projects. Each student will also give a public thesis presentation, usually on Senior Projects Day.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTHI 493  with a minimum grade of C-.

Art Studio

  
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    ARTST 107 - Systems Thinking for Problem Solvers


    2 credit(s)
    Systems thinking is a broadly applicable strategy for examining and understanding complex problems and discovering emergent patterns arising from synergistic relationships between elements in biological, physical, and social systems. In this course, we will explore systems thinking and systems modeling as a set of tools, habits and concepts for understanding the structures of complex systems. With an increased understanding of systems structure, identifying strategies for achieving lasting positive change is enhanced. Through hands-on practice, students will utilize systems thinking tools to analyze the root causes of current problems relating to environment, sustainability, design, planning, education, business, and organizational development.
    Offered: Offered Winter term.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Sustainability and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    ARTST 109 - Introduction to Graphic Design


    2 credit(s)
    Students will explore the many ways in which design is used to enhance meaning, add value, and achieve desired outcomes with print and electronic communications while becoming conversant in many fundamental principles and techniques in the field of graphic design. Also listed under MEDA 109 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 121 - Studio I: The Creative Process


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    Students will use their imagination to complete projects that reinforce the steps of the creative process and that inspire innovation, teamwork, and play. Emphasis will be placed on finding multiple and novel solutions to problems in relation to the theme and media of the specific section. Paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. See the department website or the Advising Center Website for section descriptions. Basic course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to obtain additional materials necessary to complete their projects. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 122 - Studio I CE: The Creative Process


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    Students will use their imagination to complete projects that reinforce the steps of the creative process and that inspire innovation, teamwork, and play. Emphasis will be placed on finding multiple and novel solutions to problems in relation to the theme and media of the specific section. Paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. Specific section descriptions can be found on the Advising Center website. Basic course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to obtain additional materials necessary to complete their projects. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement, Sustainability, and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 123 - Studio I SU: The Creative Process


    2 credit(s)
    Students will use their imagination to complete projects that reinforce the steps of the creative process and that inspire innovation, teamwork, and play. Emphasis will be placed on finding multiple and novel solutions to problems in relation to the theme and media of the specific section. Paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. Sustainability (SU) sections include readings and projects that connect art practice to the context of sustainability. See the department website or the advising center for section descriptions. May be repeated for credit
  
  
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    ARTST 195 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ARTST 201 - Material Science for Makers


    2 credit(s)
    This interdisciplinary course introduces students to relationships between art, craft, design, and science as applied to processes and materials used for the production of functional objects such as tools, tableware, and clothing.  Throughout history, scientific and empirical approaches have been used outside of the laboratory by artisans and craftspeople to improve our food, tools, and shelters for the benefit of our health and well-being.  In ARTST 201, students will apply the creative process as they complete hand’s on making projects. In this course, students will also use the scientific method in their work as they explore how science and culture inform and influence our choices and treatment of physical materials used to make the things we need. We will evaluate these choices for their utility and investigate the materials and processes of production from scientific frameworks. We will also assess methods of production while considering issues of sustainability and environmental stewardship. Through lecture, reading, written reflection, and hand’s on making, students will explore attitudes towards consumption and the science behind the processes of making objects of use in indigenous, traditional, and industrial cultures. The course will be team taught by faculty from both the sciences and the arts.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Sustainability and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Corequisite(s): SCI 201  
  
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    ARTST 206 - Design for Aesthetics


    4 credit(s)
    In this important foundation course students gain hands-on, skill-building experience with a variety of materials and learn the basic principles of manipulating line, shape, tone, texture, and color to achieve unified compositions on a two dimensional surface. Skills and vocabulary learned in this course will be applied in every other studio course in all media. Basic course materials will be supplied, however students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete their projects.
    Offered: Spring

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 207 - Design for Sustainability


    4 credit(s)
    Students will consider the design process as a tool for conceiving and planning sustainable communities patterned on examples provided by nature. We will consider strategies for producing necessities such as food, energy, and shelter in ways that enhance lifestyles, strengthen communities, and promote ecological health. Students engage with principles, practices, and processes of sustainable design through reading, writing, discussion, and hands-on practice in the community. This course carries a requirement of working 2 hours/week outside of class at one of the sustainability-oriented education sites in our community.
    Offered: Fall

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Core requirements: Civic Engagement, Sustainability, and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 208 - Design for Function


    4 credit(s)
    Students will explore the functional aspects of design related to user comfort, structural integrity, and manufacturability. Includes an introduction to 3D modeling software to produce digital models that can be constructed with computer-controlled fabrication technologies such as 3D printers, laser cutters or CNC milling machines, or with traditional materials such as wood, metal, or clay.  Students will work individually and collaboratively at various points in the semester to complete projects that address real world problems. Some course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete individual projects.
    Offered: Spring

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward Core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 210 - Drawing


    4 credit(s)
    This beginning level drawing course introduces students to techniques for recording observations, capturing ideas and communicating information. Course content includes constructing perspective views, rendering accurately with light and shadow, and delineating forms using various media. Students will also explore expressive ways to convey the subject matter through personal interpretation. Basic course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete their projects.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 221 - Studio II: Technique


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    Studio II offers students further opportunity to explore the creative process while building skills related to a particular studio or theme. Emphasis is on developing independent thinking through deliberate practice. The properties of materials associated with paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. See the department website or the Advising Center Website for section descriptions. Basic course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete their projects. Previous art experience recommended. May be repeated for credit.
    Offered: Spring

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 222 - Studio II CE: Technique


    2 or 4 credit(s)
    Studio II offers students further opportunity to explore the creative process while building skills related to a particular studio or theme. Emphasis is on developing independent thinking through deliberate practice. The properties of materials associated with paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. CE sections include projects that connect art practice to serving the common good. Specific section descriptions can be found on the Advising Center website. Basic course materials will be supplied; however, students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete their projects. Previous art experience recommended. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement, Sustainability, and Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 223 - Studio II SU: Exploration


    2 credit(s)
    Offers students further opportunity to explore the creative process while building skills related to a particular studio or theme. Emphasis is on developing independent thinking through deliberate practice. The properties of materials associated with paint, print, photo, ceramics, glass, metal, and other media are explored in different sections of this course. Sustainability (SU) sections include readings and projects that connect art practice to the context of sustainability. See the department website or the advising center for section descriptions. May be repeated for credit
  
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    ARTST 227 - Photography Field Class I


    2-4 credit(s)
    This course covers practical applications of photography in various locations. Students must have a 35mm DSLR camera. Course costs include some meals, lodging, and admission fees. Limited to 16 students.
    Offered: Winter 2; Instructor’s consent required Fall 4;

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 227L .
  
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    ARTST 227L - Photography Field Class I Lab


    This course is the experiential travel lab component of ARTST 227  when offered for 4 credits. ARTST 227L is a prerequisite for ARTST 227 . Instructor’s consent required. Pass/No Pass.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    ARTST 228 - Photography I


    2 credit(s)
    This is a thorough nuts and bolts course to teach students basic camera handling operations as well as introductory photography concepts. Digital darkroom, pinhole photography, and class critiques are integral to the course. Required for most other photography courses. A 35mm Digital SLR is required.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
  
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    ARTST 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ARTST 295 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ARTST 317 - Digital Art II


    4 credit(s)
    A continued exploration into the concepts and processes of photo manipulation through complex composite images, special effects, color balancing and image/text integration. Emphasis is placed on creating a personal vision and style. Students develop skills necessary to create their own unique body of work using a variety of advanced photographic and photo manipulative approaches.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 217  and ARTST 228 .
  
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    ARTST 318 - Digital Illustration II


    4 credit(s)
    A continued exploration into advanced methods of conceptualizing, organizing and executing digital illustrations. The course emphasizes problem solving methods while building experience in preparation and production with a variety of input and output devices. Discusses image resources and development, printing, papers, inks, and presentation. Alternative color systems and pre-press file formats will also be covered.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 210 
  
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    ARTST 321 - Studio III: Concepts


    4 credit(s)
    An advanced level studio course that emphasizes concept and context development. Students from all media areas will work independently or collaboratively to create well-crafted, innovative solutions to student and faculty-designed projects. Emphasis will be placed on best practices in concept development, execution and analysis. Some studio materials may be available; however, students may be required to purchase additional materials necessary to complete their projects. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 210 ; and  ARTST 206  or ARTST 207  or ARTST 208 ; and 8 200 and/or 300-level ARTST credits.
  
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    ARTST 327 - Photography Field Class II


    2-4 credit(s)
    This course covers practical applications of photography in various locations. Students must have a 35mm DSLR camera. Course costs include some meals, lodging, and admission fees. Limited to 16 students. May be repeated once for credit.
    Offered: Winter 2; Instructor’s consent required Fall 4;

    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 327L .
  
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    ARTST 327L - Photography Field Class II Lab


    This course is the experiential travel lab component of ARTST 327  when offered for 4 credits. ARTST 327L is a prerequisite for ARTST 327 . Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated once. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    ARTST 354 - Elliott Visiting Artist


    4 credit(s)
    This course is taught by a visiting artist and is designed to challenge the advanced art student in a variety of ways. Course will include intensive engagement in critique, discussion of current art topics, and studio production. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): one 300-level ARTST course; ARTST 110; and ARTST 210 .
  
  
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    ARTST 361 - Gallery Management


    2 credit(s)
    Workshop/seminar class in which students will gain hands-on experience with the post-production end of art making. Students will help to manage the permanent collection, plan and install exhibits, develop publicity, and host receptions and artist talks in formal and informal exhibit spaces on campus. Through researching contemporary artists and collecting feedback from stakeholders, students will develop an exhibit schedule to showcase the vibrant contemporary art scene. Students will also visit practicing artists in their studios and check out a variety of exhibit venues in the region. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    ARTST 369 - Interdisciplinary Design


    4 credit(s)
    Provides students with the space and resources to collaborate with each other to generate projects that serve the common good and incorporate skills, knowledge, techniques, theories and practices from their respective disciplines. Students will present and share their knowledge and skills with other students, learn knowledge and skills from other students and the instructor, and make connections between disciplines that address sustainability and foster innovation and discovery. The course will be approached in a studio/seminar hybrid model, and projects will, in an extremely broad scope, be categorized as art and design projects. May be repeated for credit
    Offered: Offered in Spring

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability; Artistic Practice and Creative Process
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits)
  
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    ARTST 370 - Interdisciplinary Design Studio


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides an opportunity to work on a real-world design problem under the guidance of guest professionals. Students will engage with all aspects of the design process. The design problem is determined by a steering group comprised of faculty, students, administrators, and staff and will typically consider sustainability in relation to the built environment, product development, landscape design, or community development. Theory to practice methodology emphasizes the development of communication, decision-making, and project management skills. In combination with the Integrative Design Seminar, this course provides a comprehensive pre-professional experience as a bridge to the post-college environment. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ARTST 210 , and ARTST 206  or ARTST 207  or ARTST 208 , and 8 credits from 200 or 300 level ARTST courses..
    Corequisite(s): .
 

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