Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Business Administration, Undergraduate

  
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    BA 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    BA 405W - Business Strategy


    4 credit(s)
    This course requires the integration of knowledge from all functional area business disciplines to make effective strategic decisions from an organization-wide perspective. The case study method of teaching combined with the dynamic application of course tools to real and simulated business situations are used.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed credits), and ECON 101 , ECON 102 , ACCT 201 ACCT 202 , BA 305 , BA 309 , BA 350 , and BA 360  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 410 - Marketing Research


    4 credit(s)
    Application of research techniques and statistical analysis to analysis to business and marketing problems. Topics include technology in the research process, secondary and primary marketing research methodologies, sampling methods, and data analysis and reporting. Course includes cases analyses and use of statistical data sets. Students will design an original market research project, gather and analyze the data, and present the findings as part of their individual project.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 207  and BA 309  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 412 - Consumer Behavior


    4 credit(s)
    An essential component of marketing is consumer insight and a successful marketing strategy must be built around an understanding of consumers. This course provides the student with that understanding of consumer behavior in the marketplace and a detailed analysis of factors that influence purchasing behavior. An interdisciplinary approach is used from such fields as economics, psychology and sociology. The course covers the major topics including attitudes, impulsive vs. deliberative purchase, motivation, perception, brand loyalty, self and identity, and product satisfaction. As we learn to characterize and predict consumer behavior, we will also discuss implications for designing and implementing marketing strategies.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 309  with a minimum grade C-.
  
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    BA 440 - Advertising and Promotion


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to the concept of integrated marketing communications (IMC) and the specific components that make up the IMC program, including advertising, direct marketing, Internet/ interactive media, public relations, sales promotion, and personal selling. Application of core concepts and techniques through case analyses, IMC exercises, and team development of advertising campaigns and presentations.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 309  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 445 - Financial Modeling & Valuation


    4 credit(s)
    Based on finance theory and strategy. Introduces the techniques used extensively in financial modeling and valuation. Topics include bond pricing model, the dynamic yield curves model, portfolia optimization model, common equity valuation model, swaps model, and option pricing model.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 305  with minimum a grade C-.
  
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    BA 452 - Global Finance


    4 credit(s)
    Global Finance presents the corporate uses of global financial markets. Combining practical knowledge, up-to-date theories, and real-world applications, this course explores issues of currencies, foreign exchange, VaR, funds, and risk management. Also listed as ECON 452 .
    Prerequisite(s): BA 305  with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 331  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 455 - New Topics


    See the Advising Center for descriptions.
  
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    BA 458 - Principles of Portfolio Management


    4 credit(s)
    Advanced study of selecting and combining securities into a portfolio.  Includes setting investment goals, diversification and risk reduction, capital market theory, and portfolio selection models.  Focus is on managing risk and return.  Advanced application of forming and managing a portfolio involving real money of the Boxer Opportunity Fund, the Student-managed Investment Fund (SMIF).
    Prerequisite(s): BA 352 .
  
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    BA 460 - Supply Chain Management


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the strategic and tactical issues associated with the design and management of supply chains, providing a comprehensive view of the concepts and decision models in effectively managing the flow of goods, services, and information in a global environment. This course uses case studies, simulation, and advanced Excel tools to investigate important areas of supply chain management (such as logistics, procurement, transportation, and demand planning) in an integrated view via using. The course provides knowledge and skills in design and configure business processes in Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) environment.
    Prerequisite(s): BA 350 .
  
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    BA 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    BA 490 - Senior Seminar


    2 credit(s)
    As part of the capstone experience, Business seniors enroll in a senior seminar course, as appropriate for their chosen area of interest. The seminar serves as the forum in which students are prepared for and guided through their capstone experiences (internship or research project). Students will share with and learn from peers completing similar capstones. The seminar course also uses business periodicals and journals as a focus of seminar discussion to help bridge the gap between theory and practice.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 , ECON 102 , BA 201, BA 202, BA 305 , BA 309 , BA 350 , and BA 360  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    BA 495 - Independent Research


    Student-conducted individual research/theoretical project. Faculty supervised. Independent study contract required.

Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 110 - Chemistry & Your Environment


    2 credit(s)
    An introductory chemistry course for students who do not plan to take additional chemistry. Basic principles of chemistry are developed and used to explain phenomena of significance to our lives. Topics include environmental issues such as atmospheric and water chemistry, nuclear power, and fuels.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
  
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    CHEM 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    CHEM 220 - General Chemistry I


    4 credit(s)
    The first of a two semester sequence which introduces the basic concepts of chemistry by addressing: atomic and molecular structure, chemical and physical properties of materials, nomenclature, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gas laws, and thermochemistry. These topics are studied in the context of inorganic and organic chemistry. Includes laboratory.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 122  or placement.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 220L .
  
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    CHEM 220L - General Chemistry I Lab


    Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry I lecture.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 220 .
  
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    CHEM 230 - General Chemistry II


    4 credit(s)
    The second of a two semester sequence continuing from CHEM 220 . Topics include: kinetics, equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry and special topics such as nuclear chemistry. General Chemistry II Laboratory is a corequisite.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 220  with a minimum grade of C- and MATH 125  or MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 230L  or CHEM 233 .
  
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    CHEM 230L - General Chemistry II Laboratory


    Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry II lecture.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 230 .
  
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    CHEM 233 - General Chemistry II Lab & Project


    1 credit(s)
    Laboratory to accompany General Chemistry II lecture in place of CHEM 230L . Includes an introduction to research design and methods in chemistry and scientific writing.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 220  with a minimum grade of B.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 230 .
  
  
  •  

    CHEM 275 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    CHEM 295 - Independent Project


    Work in chemistry and introduction to chemistry research on a topic of mutual interest to the student and a faculty member. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit or continued as CHEM 495.
  
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    CHEM 300 - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the primary topics of organic chemistry, largely organized around the study of the major functional groups. Topics include: structural analysis of simple carbon compounds, organic chemical nomenclature, survey of functional group chemistry (including carbonyl groups), elementary polar reaction mechanisms, and stereochemistry. Requires concurrent enrollment in a corresponding laboratory section.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 300L .
  
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    CHEM 300L - Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry Lab


    Laboratory to accompany Fundamentals of Organic Chemistry lecture.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 300 .
  
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    CHEM 330 - Fundamentals of Inorganic Chemistry


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the primary topics of inorganic chemistry: atomic and molecular structure including molecular orbital theory and molecular symmetry, solid state chemistry, coordination compounds, organometallics, catalysis and bioinorganic chemistry. Physical methods appropriate to the study of inorganic chemistry will also be discussed.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230  with a minimum grade of C- Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 300  is highly recommended.
  
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    CHEM 340 - Quantitative Analysis


    2 credit(s)
    This is an introductory course to the analytical process in the field of Chemistry, paying particular attention to developing research questions; core methodological theories and principles, such as volumetric, gravimetric, colorimetric, and instrumental; preparing samples; as well as the synthesis and reporting of data
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits) and CHEM 230  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    CHEM 341 - Quantitative Analysis Lab


    2 credit(s)
    A laboratory course to accompany and give practical illustration to the principles covered in CHEM 340 , which is a corequisite.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 340  CHEM 300  is highly recommended.
  
  
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    CHEM 360 - Environmental Chemistry


    4 credit(s)
    Lecture and laboratory course exploring natural chemical processes in the environment as well as issues affecting human and environmental health. Students will examine our understanding of chemical change in the atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere, and biosphere.  CHEM 340  is recommended prior to enrollment.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300   with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CHEM 361 - Lab Techniques Env Toxicology & Chem


    1 credit(s)
    Changes in the environment are ultimately the result of chemical processes. This laboratory course examines our understanding of chemical change in various environmental compartments from a practical perspective. Methodology for monitoring and modeling these systems will be utilized, including standard toxicity testing, use of biomarkers, tissue, air, water and soil analyses, and molecular techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300 .
  
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    CHEM 370 - Fundamentals of Physical Chemistry


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the primary topics of physical chemistry: chemical thermodynamics and equilibrium, chemical kinetics, molecular structure, and molecular spectroscopy. Includes laboratory applications of the principles of physical chemistry.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 230 ; PHY 202  or PHY 232W ; and MATH 227 , each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    CHEM 380 - Fundamentals of Biochemistry


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the chemistry of biological molecules with investigation of the structure and function of biological molecules in enzyme action, metabolism, energetics, and the flow of genetic information.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300  with a minimum grade of C- BIOL 204 is highly recommended.
  
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    CHEM 385 - Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    Participation in discussions about recent advances in the field of chemistry. May be repeated once for credit. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits) and CHEM 230  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    CHEM 392 - Advanced Integrated Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    An advanced laboratory experience for upper division chemistry majors. The course will focus on one area of chemistry but will incorporate ideas and techniques from several of the sub-disciplines. A course, for example, might be focused on synthetic inorganic chemistry but also incorporate organic synthesis, catalysis, kinetic measurements and spectroscopic analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): Three foundational courses from CHEM 300 , CHEM 330 , CHEM 341 , CHEM 370 , and CHEM 380  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    CHEM 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  •  

    CHEM 396W - Chemical Literacy


    2 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the primary and secondary chemical literature in order to develop the writing composition, discipline-specific research, and critical-analytical skills necessary to complete their senior capstone project. As such, it is normally taken by students in the spring of their junior year and is a prerequisite of the capstone courses. Students wishing to travel abroad that semester will need to consult with the department to arrange an alternative. Students practice researching, reading, and evaluating academic journal articles and others venues for dissemination in the field. They also compose and revise a variety of field-specific genres in scientific communication, including graphical presentation of data. In this context, students will be instructed in ethics and pathways beyond Pacific.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Declared Chemistry major.
  
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    CHEM 400 - Advanced Organic Chemistry


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an exploration of advanced topics in organic chemistry. Topics include spectroscopy and structural determination; reaction mechanisms associated with aromatic, pericyclic, and radical reactions; organic synthetic methods; polymer chemistry, and a survey of biomolecules. Requires concurrent enrollment in a corresponding laboratory section.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300  with a minimum grade of C.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 400L .
  
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    CHEM 400L - Advanced Organic Chemistry Laboratory


    Laboratory to accompany Advanced Organic Chemistry lecture.
    Corequisite(s): CHEM 400 .
  
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    CHEM 438 - Bioinorganic Chemistry


    2 credit(s)
    This course explores the role of metals in biological systems. Topics include a review of basic coordination chemistry and biochemistry, metal uptake and transport, metallo-protein structure and function, metal complexes as therapeutics and imaging agents, and the physical methods used to study these topics. Analysis of papers from the primary literature will be included.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 330  and CHEM 380 , both with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CHEM 444 - Instrumental Methods of Analysis


    4 credit(s)
    A three hour lecture and three hour laboratory for the introduction to the principles of instrumental methods of chemical analysis. Topics include experimental design, analytical figures of merit, and spectrometric and chromatographic methods of analysis.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 340  and CHEM 341  both with a minimum grade of C; and PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-.  PHY 204 may be taken as a co-requisite upon instructor approval.
  
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    CHEM 450 - Advanced Topics


    1-2 credit(s)
    A lecture or laboratory course concentrating on a specific topic in chemistry at the advanced level. For example mass spectrometry, high field nuclear magnetic resonance, or pharmacology. Sophomore standing or above; additional prerequisites may apply depending on the topic. May be repeated for credit.
  
  
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    CHEM 472 - Chemical Thermodynamics & Kinetics


    2 credit(s)
    An advanced physical chemistry course focusing on chemical thermodynamics and kinetics. The study of thermodynamics will apply mathematical models of energy relationships to the understanding of chemical equilibrium. The subject of statistical thermodynamics will be introduced. The study of kinetics will include a survey of experimental techniques used to quantify the rates of chemical reactions, as well as a study of the molecular models of chemical reactions, including reaction mechanisms and reaction theories. The course includes a laboratory component to complement the in-class work.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 370  with a minimum grade of C
  
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    CHEM 474 - Chem Quantum Mechanics & Spectroscopy


    2 credit(s)
    An advanced physical chemistry course focusing on quantum mechanics and its applications toward chemical spectroscopy. The study of quantum mechanics will apply quantum principles and mathematical methods to fundamental chemical systems: the atom, diatomic and polyatomic molecules. Molecular electronic structure and its applications to predict molecular properties will be emphasized. Electronic structure computational methods will be introduced. An understanding of quantum effects in molecules will inform the study molecular spectroscopy techniques. Spectroscopic techniques covered include rotational, vibrational, electronic, and magnetic methods. The course includes a laboratory component to complement the in-class work.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 370  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CHEM 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required. Pass/No Pass
  
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    CHEM 480 - Advanced Biochemistry


    2 credit(s)
    This course will further explore the metabolism and structure and function of biological molecules and will continue to emphasize major biochemical concepts developed in CHEM 380 .
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 380  with a minimum grade of C
  
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    CHEM 481 - Biochemistry Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    A laboratory course to introduce standard biochemical techniques including protein purification, execution of enzyme assays, SDS-PAGE, and western blots. Emphasis will be placed on experimental design, data acquisition, and data interpretation.
    Offered: Offered Winter.

    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits) and CHEM 380  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
  •  

    CHEM 486 - Capstone Research


    1-2 credit(s)
    Students begin their senior capstone research with a faculty mentor. Topics should be selected in consultation with the mentor and should be consistent with the goals of the final capstone course, either Capstone: Project or Capstone: Thesis. Students wishing to continue on to CHEM 499 - Capstone: Thesis , should enroll in 2 credits. Regular attendance at department colloquia required. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for 1 credit one time (for a total of 2 credits).
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 396W , Instructor’s consent.
  
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    CHEM 489 - Capstone: Project


    1 credit(s)
    This course is a culmination of the work started in CHEM 486 - Capstone Research . Examples of acceptable projects include: a focused review of the literature that results in an original interpretation or novel application, a pedagogical project for students interested in pursuing a career in teaching, an internship at an industrial or government laboratory, and a community service project which uses innovative application of chemical principles and technology. Students will complete a project paper and make an oral presentation based upon work completed the previous semester. Regular attendance and presentation at department colloquia is required. Instructor consent required.
    Offered: Offered Spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 486  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CHEM 495 - Research


    Independent laboratory studies or theoretical studies on projects of mutual interest to the student and faculty. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit for continuing or new projects.
  
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    CHEM 499 - Capstone: Thesis


    2 credit(s)
    This course is a culmination of the work started in CHEM 486 - Capstone Research . Students electing to do a thesis will engage in a substantial research project that will involve an investigation of the scientific literature and original research on a current topic in chemistry. Presentation of the thesis work at a department colloquium and for senior presentation day is required. Regular attendance and participation at department colloquia is required. Instructor’s consent required.
    Offered: Offered Spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): 2 of CHEM 486  with a minimum grade of C.

Chinese

  
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    CHIN 101 - Intro to Chinese Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    The beginning course is intended to give training in the basic listening and reading of Chinese (Mandarin). Introduction of Chinese characters and presentation of the cultural behaviors that influence language usage.
  
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    CHIN 102 - Intro to Chinese Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of CHIN 101  intended to give training in the basic listening and reading of Chinese (Mandarin). Introduction of Chinese characters and presentation of the cultural behaviors that influence language usage.
    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 101  or placement.
  
  •  

    CHIN 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  •  

    CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese


    4 credit(s)
    The intermediate course is intended for expansion of conversational skills, reading practice, and grammatical constructions. Development of writing skills. Emphasis on effective spoken communication and reading practice.
    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 102  or placement.
  
  •  

    CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of CHIN 201  - intended for expansion of conversational skills, reading practice, and grammatical constructions. Development of writing skills. Emphasis on effective spoken communication and reading practice.
    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 201  or placement.
  
  
  •  

    CHIN 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    CHIN 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  •  

    CHIN 301 - Communicating in Chinese


    4 credit(s)
    Development of communicative competence in Chinese with emphasis on conversational skill. Application of cultural awareness in various communication situations. Taught in Chinese.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 202  or placement.
  
  •  

    CHIN 305 - Chinese Reading and Writing


    4 credit(s)
    Study of Chinese writing and the enhancement of reading skills. Acquisition of more vocabulary to facilitate Chinese reading and writing. Cultural and social influences on expressions and styles will be discussed. Taught in Chinese.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 202  or placement.
  
  •  

    CHIN 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
  •  

    CHIN 401 - Selected Chinese Short Stories


    4 credit(s)
    This course will focus on selected topics in contemporary Chinese short stories, which include such themes as nature and humans, life and death, love and loyalty, family and friends, and self and public. Students will understand Chinese values, beliefs, and norms through extensive analysis of these topics. The course also provides the opportunity to enhance Chinese reading skills by studying various styles of the stories. Taught in Chinese.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): CHIN 301  and CHIN 305 .

Civic Engagement

  
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    CIV 105 - Introduction to Civic Engagement


    2 credit(s)
    Provides students with the opportunity to integrate academic concepts with learning from a civic engagement experience while contributing to the betterment of society or the environment. May be repeated once for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
  •  

    CIV 109 - Civic Engagement Project Preparation


    Civic engagement projects combine academic learning with action (such as service, advocacy, awareness-raising, community-based research, campaigning, or activism) to address a significant social or environmental issue in the community (e.g. immigration, education, pollution, injustice, etc.). Students design their own projects, which entail approximately 40 hours of action and associated academic work sponsored by a faculty member. CIV 109 is the first semester of a two-semester sequence and must be taken in conjunction with CIV 110  or CIV 111  in order to fulfill the CE Cornerstone. Project proposal forms are available from the Center for Civic Engagement and must be submitted to the Registrar with approval signatures. Instructor’s consent required. Pass/No Pass.
  
  •  

    CIV 110 - Civic Engagement Project


    0-1 credit(s)
    Civic engagement projects combine academic learning with action (such as service, advocacy, awareness-raising, community-based research, campaigning, or activism) to address a significant social or environmental issue in the community (e.g. immigration, education, pollution, injustice, etc.). Students design their own projects, which entail approximately 40 hours of action and associated academic work sponsored by a faculty member. For projects spanning more than one semester, students must take CIV 109  as the first semester of a two-semester sequence in conjunction with CIV 110. Project proposal forms are available from the Center for Civic Engagement and must be submitted to the Registrar with approval signatures. Pass/No Pass.
  
  •  

    CIV 111 - Civic Engagement & Diversity Project


    2 credit(s)
    Civic engagement projects combine academic learning with action (such as service, advocacy, awareness-raising, community-based research, campaigning, or activism) to address a significant social or environmental issue in the community (e.g. immigration, education, environmental justice, etc.). CIV 111 students design their own projects, which entail approximately 40 hours of action, in a context that also provides in-depth experiences with diversity, and complete associated academic work sponsored by a faculty member. For projects spanning more than one semester, students must take CIV 109  as the first semester of a two-semester sequence in conjunction with CIV 111. Project proposal forms are available from the Center for Civic Engagement and must be submitted to the Registrar with approval signatures.
  
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    CIV 140 - College 3D


    2 credit(s)
    Students in this course will examine the systems, policies, and supports that facilitate college success. By understanding their own skills, strengths, and leadership potential in the college context, students will work with diverse children to promote college awareness from an early age. Students will learn from guest instructors about topics such as child development, behavior management, diversity, college planning, and related issues. Students will work with school and campus staff to coordinate visits and plan activities. Students must be available for seminar sessions and on scheduled visit days as coordinated within the group.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    CIV 155 - New Topics


    1 credit(s)
    Click here for the topic description or see the Advising Center.
  
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    CIV 212 - Civically Engaged Travel


    2 credit(s)
    In this short-term travel immersion experience, students will explore a community through the lens of specific social and/or environmental issues it faces, and address those issues with individual and collective action. Through academic, experiential, and reflective components, students will critically examine existing responses to community problems and formulate their own responses. 40 hours of service and/or advocacy (over 1-3 weeks), preparatory sessions prior to departure, and wrap-up sessions upon return are required. Issues addressed vary and additional fees may be required; see current course list for details. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit with different trips.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    CIV 225 - Peer Health Education


    4 credit(s)
    Prepares students to facilitate workshops on healthy relationships and interpersonal violence prevention. Students explore the root causes of interpersonal violence using theorietical frameworks from public health, social work and feminist theory. As part of the course students facilitate the Safe Dates curriculum at alternative high schools. Also listed as GSS 225 Previously Listed As: PH 225.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    CIV 227 - Action for Affordable Housing


    2 credit(s)
    This course will explore the ways in which each of us can work toward fair and affordable housing. Students will learn about social, cultural, political, and environmental issues that shape our housing system. Students will also take action to work toward affordable housing through field site experiences (such as helping to build homes, shelter those without housing, or housing advocacy). Time outside of scheduled course meetings is required for the civic engagement experiences in this course. Please see instructor for details about the nature and logistics of the civic engagement component.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
  •  

    CIV 233 - Healthy Communities


    2 credit(s)
    In this course students will work with community groups to both learn about and provide outreach on health-related topics determined by the community. Students will research these health-related topics, bring their existing knowledge and resources to begin addressing these issues, and build skills in critically reading health information. Students will also have an opportunity to learn about health issues directly from community members. With this exchange of knowledge about health, students will be learning the process of community-based education and examining the roles of expert and layman in health education. In addition, students will conduct an assessment of their work.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    CIV 240 - Food for Thought & Action


    2 credit(s)
    Students in this class will explore various topics related to our food system (such as organic/industrial farming, laws governing ingredients/portions, labels, obesity, food insecurity, ethical eating, etc.), and the relationship between these issues, civic engagement, and personal food choices. Students will learn about ways to take action in the food system and the work that individuals, non-profit organizations, governments, and businesses are already doing to shape change. The class will involve field trips to food-related organizations and the Pacific University B Street farm. Physical outdoor work and additional civic engagement time outside of class are required.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement and Sustainability.
  
  
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    CIV 295 - Independent Study


    1 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    CIV 305 - Advanced Civic Engagement


    2 credit(s)
    Students will build on previous civic engagement experiences to work on a significant need or issue
    in the community. Students will apply their knowledge and skills directly to a civic engagement site placement or project in order to make meaningful contributions to a cause and augment their understanding of the issue. Students will also critically examine how their personal action fits into an array of approaches to address social and environmental problems through civic engagement. May be repeated once for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): Take one Civic Engagement designated course.
  
  •  

    CIV 315 - Civic Engagement Mentoring


    2 credit(s)
    This course will provide the skills and knowledge for students who are already experienced in civic engagement to take the next step to mentor students who are entering this process. Students in PSJ 315 will meet with the instructor to learn how to assist other students with identifying areas of interest in civic engagement, framing their intended work within the Civic Engagement guidelines, identifying potential sites, mentoring and problem-solving techniques, reflection activities, and assisting mentees with the final product of their civic engagement experience. Students may also assist faculty in Civic Engagement courses or take leadership in Civic Engagement programs. May be repeated once for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): one Civic Engagement designated course and attendance at a pre-semester workshop.
  
  •  

    CIV 317 - Grant Writing & Non-Profit Fundraising


    2 credit(s)
    Social activists, non-profit leaders, educators and many other professionals need effective grant writing skills in order to secure competitive funding from government agencies and private foundations. Writing a successful grant proposal requires writing proficiency, strong research skills, creativity, and organizational ability. This course provides students with the background necessary to develop a strong case statement, an essential component of a competitive funding proposal. Working with community partners, students in this project-based course will create a submissable case statement that can be utilized in multiple grant proposals. Topics covered include: researching grant opportunities, writing the proposal, budget development, and professional ethics.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 180 ENGW 181 , or ENGW 182  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
  •  

    CIV 320 - Leadership in Community Engagement


    2 credit(s)
    Prepares students who are already experienced in civic engagement (CE) to take the next step, deepen their civic knowledge, and practice leadership skills.  Students will strengthen CE at Pacific with attention to civic learning, collaboration, and aligning student, faculty, and community interests with meaningful CE throughout the disciplines. Specific activities will vary, but could include: orienting students to CE, facilitating class discussions, conducting assessments, coordinating community conversations, collecting and analyzing data, and advanced civic participation. Instructor’s Consent required. May be repeated for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
  
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    CIV 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.

Computer Science

  
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    CS 121 - Our Digital World


    2 credit(s)
    An exploration of the impact and effects of the Internet on all aspects of our lives as global citizens. This course examines the ethical, cultural, economic and political aspects of the Internet as a social technology. Also listed as MEDA 121 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    CS 122 - Introduction to Digital Media


    2 credit(s)
    An introduction to producing, editing and publishing computer-based media including computer graphics, Web sites, and streaming media. Includes a survey of modern communications formats such as blogs, podcasts, and social networks. Also listed as MEDA 122 .
  
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    CS 130 - Introduction to Software Tools


    2 credit(s)
    Many disciplines are finding the need to gather, manipulate, analyze, and graph data. This course will introduce students to software tools that aid in this process. Software that is widely used at Pacific includes: a Statistics Software Package, Excel, Word, and PowerPoint. Class includes lab projects.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 125  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CS 150 - Introduction to Computer Science I


    4 credit(s)
    A first course in computer programming fundamentals: no previous programming experience is required. This course will be taught in C++ and include programming projects in a variety of areas. Course content includes data types, selection structures, repetition structures, functions, arrays, structures and I/O. In addition to three lectures per week, the class meets weekly for a laboratory session.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 125 .
  
  
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    CS 160 - Introduction to Python and Git


    2 credit(s)
    Introduces students to programming in Python. Python is a popular language used across many scientificdisciplinesto manipulate data, run simulations, and perform high performance computing. The course content will include Python data structures such as lists and dictionaries as well as using Python to interact with other software such as R. The course will be structured around a series of practical exercises to allow students to gain experience quickly. Further, students will gain experience with revision control through Git. A portion of the programming projects will be group projects to allow studentsto take advantage of Git in a collaborative environment. Also listed as DSCI 160
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning
    Prerequisite(s): CS 150 or CS 130 with a minimum grade of C or previous programming experience with instructor approval
  
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    CS 205 - Intro to Programming for Multimedia


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces students with little or no programming experience to the design and development of software applications using a high-level, object-oriented programming language such as JavaScript
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 122  or MEDA 122  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CS 232 - Mobile Data Collection & Analysis


    2 credit(s)
    This course will show students how to use modern mobile data collection systems in laboratory and field applications. Experiments will be designed and carried out using mobile devices for data collection and software tools for data analysis and reporting. Sample experiments might revolve around topics such as blood pressure, EKG, flow rate, GPS with Google Maps, pH, light, pressure, and temperature.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 130  and MATH 125 , both with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CS 250 - Introduction to Computer Science II


    4 credit(s)
    A second course in programming that is a continuation of CS 150 . The focus of this course is object-oriented programming in C++. Concepts taught include pointers, classes, operator overloading, inheritance, and polymorphism. These concepts will be reinforced with advanced programming projects including introductory game programming.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 150  and MATH 125  each with a minimum grade of C.
  
  
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    CS 260 - Intro to Java & Android Programming


    2 credit(s)
    The focus of this course is programming using Java and Android Devices including Smartphones. Students will design, develop, and test Java programs. Topics will include the Java API, Smartphone hardware features, and Event Driven Programming.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 250  with a minimum grade of C and declared Computer Science major.
  
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    CS 275 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    CS 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    CS 300 - Data Structures


    4 credit(s)
    Data structures are fundamental to advanced, efficient programming. Topics including asymptotic analysis, stacks, queues, linked lists, trees, and hash tables will be covered in discussions centering around more sophisticated programming concepts, problem solving techniques, and software reusability.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 250  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CS 310 - Theoretical Computer Science


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces the foundations of formal language theory, computability, and complexity, shows the relationship between automata and various classes of languages, addresses the issue of which problems can be solved by computational means and studies the complexity of their solutions. It also studies Turing machines and equivalent models of computation, the Chomsky hierarchy, context free grammars, push-down automata, and computability.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): CS 250  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    CS 315 - Intro to Human Computer Interaction


    4 credit(s)
    Humans interact with computers through user interfaces; designing useful and effective interfaces involves many challenges for both designers and programmers. This course will cover the basics of the field of human computer interaction including the human factors of interactive software, methods to develop and assess interfaces, interaction styles and design considerations. The class will include research and design projects as well as a programming project.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 250  or MEDA 265  with a minimum grade of C.
 

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