Sep 29, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Dance

  
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    DANC 301 - Choreography I


    4 credit(s)
    An introductory course on learning the craft of choreography. It focuses on strengthening performance skills for staged works through improvisational movement exercises and choreographic studies. As a choreographer, the student will learn to develop movement themes through the exploration and use of the concepts and principles applied in dance, such as time, space, and energy. Overall, students will develop a critical awareness through analytical assessment of his/her own work and other choreographic works.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 200 .
  
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    DANC 302 - Dance Concert Production


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed for students who have a desire to pursue a choreographic capstone and for students who have an interest understanding both the choreographic and production aspects of concert dance. It also addresses both the creative and production roles expected of choreographers presenting dance in concerts. It stresses the importance of the communication skills needed as a director of rehearsals, in collaborating with the technical/costume designers, and in public relations. Students learn multiple skills needed for a choreographer presenting work in the field of dance.
    Offered: Offered every Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): DANC 301  
    Corequisite(s): Any 200-level or 300-level dance technique course.
  
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    DANC 305 - Advanced Ballet I


    2 credit(s)
    Dance 305 is a continuation of Intermediate Ballet (DANC 205  and DANC 206 ). Course is taught based on a progressive curriculum. The course concentrates on classical ballet exercises with an emphasis on proper body alignment, improving flexibility and strength, terminology, and theory of movement. The 0-2 option is only available to Dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 205  and DANC 206 .
  
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    DANC 306 - Advanced Ballet II


    2 credit(s)
    A continuation of DANC 305 . Course is taught based on a progressive curriculum. The course concentrates on classical ballet exercises with an emphasis on proper body alignment, improving flexibility and strength, and terminology and theory of movement. The 0-2 option is only available to Dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 205  and DANC 206 ; or DANC 305 .
  
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    DANC 310W - Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dancers I


    4 credit(s)
    The study of body mechanics as it pertains to dance movement. This course concentrates on anatomy and physiology, nutrition for dancers, screening for muscular imbalances, injury prevention, and supplemental conditioning. Its goal is to give dancers knowledge, insight, and an understanding of proper body mechanics, technically, and aesthetically as it applies to dance movement. It also aids in a greater understanding of the importance of maintaining the body at its physical peak to meet the demands of a profession in dance both mentally and physically. BIOL 110 or BIOL 200 , BIOL 230 or BIOL 240, and EXIP 281  recommended.
  
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    DANC 320 - Anatomy and Kinesiology for Dancers II


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of the study of body mechanics as it pertains to dance movement. This course concentrates on anatomy and physiology, nutrition for dancers, screening for muscular imbalances, injury prevention, and supplemental conditioning. Its goal is to give dancers knowledge, insight, and an understanding of proper body mechanics technically and aesthetically as it applies to dance movement. It also aids in a greater understanding of the importance of maintaining the body at its physical peak to meet the demands of a profession in dance both mentally and physically.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 310W .
  
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    DANC 321 - Advanced Jazz Dance I


    2 credit(s)
    Course is an intermediate/advanced level class. Course work taught progressively based on technique taught from Intermediate Jazz Dance I and II. The course work is based on contemporary and classical styles of jazz dance with the focus on body isolations, syncopated rhythms, improvisation and stylized choreography. The 0-2 option is only available to dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 221  and DANC 222 .
  
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    DANC 322 - Advanced Jazz Dance II


    2 credit(s)
    This course is an intermediate/advanced level class. Course work taught progressively based on technique taught from Intermediate Jazz Dance I and II. The course work is based on contemporary and classical styles of jazz dance with the focus on body isolations, syncopated rhythms, improvisation, and stylized choreography. The 0-2 option is only available to dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 221  and DANC 222 ; or DANC 321 .
  
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    DANC 325 - Injury Prevention Conditioning Dancers


    2 credit(s)
    Dancers Designed to teach dancers how to maintain a healthy practice through the use of cross-conditioning exercises. The course will also focus on how to screen for muscular weaknesses and apply conditioning exercises to strengthen dancers’ bodies to prevent injuries. Additionally, there will be an overview on the benefits of healthy eating habits for dancers and their importance in sustaining both mental and physical stamina needed for the demands of dance. DANC 310W  and DANC 320  recommended.
    Corequisite(s): A 200 or 300-level technique course.
  
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    DANC 326 - Advanced Contemporary Dance I


    2 credit(s)
    This is an intermediate/advanced level technique class taught progressively from lessons taught in Beginning and Intermediate Contemporary Dance (DANC 126 , DANC 127 , DANC 226 , DANC 227 ). It focuses on strengthening dancers movements skills through increased flexibility, strength, endurance; musical awareness; develop an understanding and appreciation of contemporary dance; learn original choreography and understand pertinent anatomical vocabulary needed to develop strong contemporary technique. The 0-2 option is only available to Dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 226  and DANC 227 .
  
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    DANC 327 - Advanced Contemporary Dance II


    2 credit(s)
    A continuation of DANC 326 . This is an intermediate/advanced level technique class taught progressively from lessons taught in Beginning and Intermediate Contemporary Dance (DANC 126 , DANC 127 , DANC 226 , DANC 227 , DANC 326 ). It focuses on strengthening dancers movements skills through increased flexibility, strength, endurance; musical awareness; develop an understanding and appreciation of contemporary dance; learn original choreography and understand pertinent anatomical vocabulary needed to develop strong Contemporary technique. The 0-2 option is only available to Dance majors and minors. May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 226  and DANC 227 ; or DANC 326 .
  
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    DANC 336 - Lighting for Dance & Directors


    2 credit(s)
    Gives students practical knowledge and experience with the lighting craft to inform both their creative work and their ability to collaborate and communicate their lighting needs when working with designers. Students will be exposed to practical application and creation of expressive lighting techniques. Students will explore color theory and electrical safety. This class is recommended for, but not limited to, dance students. Also listed as THEA 336 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
    Prerequisite(s): THEA 120  or DANC 200  DANC 301  and DANC 401  recommended.
  
  
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    DANC 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    DANC 401 - Choreography II


    4 credit(s)
    Choreography II allows students who have studied basic choreography to focus on creating work for small groups. It focuses on strengthening performance skills for staged works through improvisational movement exercises and choreographic. As a choreographer, the student will learn to develop movement themes through the exploration and use of the concepts and principles applied in dance, such as time, space, shape, force, and motivation. The course will also focus on the development of a critical awareness in the analytical evaluation of his/her own work and through the viewing of other choreographic works.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 301 .
    Corequisite(s): A 200 or 300-level technique course.
  
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    DANC 420 - Teaching Methods of Dance


    4 credit(s)
    Concentrates on how to prepare students to teach dance. It focuses on isolating and analyzing individual movements, with an emphasis on correct, safe execution and use of appropriate muscles. In addition, students learn how to teach with an accompanist, understand time signatures for specific movement combinations, prepare a course lesson plan, and daily lesson plans. Each student will teach at least one lesson to the entire class.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 305  and DANC 306 ; or DANC 321  and DANC 322 ; or DANC 326  and DANC 327 .
  
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    DANC 429 - Dance Ensemble II


    0-1 credit(s)
    Advanced Company Rehearsal and performance of new dance repertory and historical choreography. Continued development and refinement of skills acquired in other courses. Occasional work with guest dance artists and choreographers. Meets twice weekly. Audition required. Course is intended for juniors and seniors. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit.
    Offered: Offered each semester.

    Corequisite(s): Any 200 or 300-level technique course.
  
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    DANC 495 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.
  
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    DANC 497 - Senior Capstone Project I


    2 credit(s)
    This course is an independent project for senior students, which fulfills 2 of the 4 required for the Dance major. Areas may emphasize either aspects of performance/choreography, or dance research. Projects may include research in the following areas of dance: education, science, art, history, digital media, or other related topics. The capstone project will be determined between the student and the faculty advisor. Students must meet with their advisor during their junior year to set goals in order to complete their capstone project in the fall and spring of their senior year. Students choosing the choreography/performance project, will present their project in the fall semester. Students choosing the research project will complete fieldwork in the fall semester and written research results will be completed in DANC 498 . Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    DANC 498 - Senior Capstone Project II


    2 credit(s)
    This course is part two of the independent project for senior students who have completed DANC 497  in completion toward the Dance major. Students will complete a written thesis documenting the process and results from DANC 497 . A final oral presentation of the final work findings will be completed at the end of the semester discussing results from the performance, showing, teaching demonstration, or the chosen dance project.
    Prerequisite(s): DANC 497  with a minimum grade of B.

Data Science

  
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    DSCI 100 - Foundations of Data Science


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides students with a broad introduction to fundamental aspects of data science, an interdisciplinary field combining elements of mathematics, statistics, and computational science. The course is designed for students from across disciplines seeking to build their data handling skills. Students will practice specific skills related to data acquisition, curation, and visualization, will learn to leverage software tools in this process, and will become familiar with a range of data science applications across various disciplines and industries. Students will work with real data on class projects, and will have guest lectures by data science practitioners drawn from local industry.
    Core Requirement(s): Course meets Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 125 , MATH 207 , or SOC 301  with a minimum grade of C, or Math placement III or higher.
  
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    DSCI 160 - Introduction to Python and Git


    2 credit(s)
    Introduces students to programming in Python. Python is a popular language used across many scientificdisciplinesto manipulate data, run simulations, and perform high performance computing. The course content will include Python data structures such as lists and dictionaries as well as using Python to interact with other software such as R. The course will be structured around a series of practical exercises to allow students to gain experience quickly. Further, students will gain experience with revision control through Git. A portion of the programming projects will be group projects to allow studentsto take advantage of Git in a collaborative environment. Also listed as CS 160
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning
    Prerequisite(s): CS 150 or CS 130 with a minimum grade of C or previous programming experience with instructor approval
  
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    DSCI 210 - Data Visualization With Python


    2 credit(s)
    introduce students to a variety of data acquisition, data manipulation, and data visualization tools in Python ecosystem. Students will gain experience integrating data from external sources into their Python program by utilizing existing packages and developing their own code. The course content will include most commonly used data manipulation instruments. Dataframes will be introduced as a means of working with structured data tables. Studentswill create rich and interactive data visualizations by using a variety of Python visualization tools. The course will include practical exercises and group projects. 2 credits
    Prerequisite(s): CS 160 or DSCI 160 with a minimum grade of C
  
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    DSCI 340 - Algorithms & Data Structures


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to data structures and algorithms, including their design, analysis and implementation.  Data structures including arrays, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and heaps will be explored, and algorithm design methods such as the greedy method, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, and backtracking will be investigated in the context of sorting, string-searching, and graph-based algorithms. Course includes programming projects in Python.
    Offered: Alternate years

    Prerequisite(s): CS 250  with a minimum grade of C
  
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    DSCI 407 - Statistical Modeling and Regression


    4 credit(s)
    Regression analysis is a powerful applied statistical technique. This course focuses on regression models and associated methods of statistical inference, data analysis, interpretation of results, statistical computation and model building. Topics covered include simple and multiple linear regression; correlation; the use of dummy variables; residuals and diagnostics; model building/variable selection; expressing regression models and methods in matrix form; an introduction to weighted least squares, regression with correlated errors and nonlinear regression. The course makes extensive use of R.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 307  with a grade of C or better
  
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    DSCI 440 - Machine Learning and Data Mining


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to machine learning techniques and their applications. Covers standard learning methods such as linear regression, neural networks, decision trees, support vector machines, naive Bayes, and nearest neighbors. Provides experience implementing, applying, and assessing the accuracy of machine learning methods to data science problems.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): DSCI 340  and MATH 307 , each with a minimum grade of C; MATH 206  (may be taken concurrently)
  
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    DSCI 490 - Senior Capstone


    2 credit(s)
    Students will have the opportunity to apply their data science skills and knowledge to an original project, chosen and implemented under the guidance of a faculty supervisor.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior Standing (90 or more completed credits), declared Data Science major, one 400-level DSCI course with a minimum grade of C (may be taken concurrently).
  
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    DSCI 492 - Senior Capstone II


    2 credit(s)
    DSCI 492 is a continuation of DSCI 490, the first semester of the data science capstone course sequence. Students will complete their capstone project, resulting in a final paper and a senior capstone presentation.
    Prerequisite(s): DSCI 490   with a minimum grade of C.

Dental Hygiene Studies

  
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    DHS 311 - Fundamentals of Dental Hygiene Care


    2 credit(s)
    Designed to prepare entry-level clinicians for implementation of clinical patient care, to include all aspects of the dental hygiene process of care. The course also includes the foundations of professionalism and ethics, safety and infection control, and the principles of instrumentation.
  
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    DHS 312 - Applied Dental Hygiene Care


    2 credit(s)
    Designed to prepare entry-level clinicians for implementation of clinical patient care and management of medical emergencies. The course provides further study into preventive care for the healthy/gingivitis patient as well as management of medical emergencies in the dental setting.
  
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    DHS 313 - Advanced Dental Hygiene Procedures


    2 credit(s)
    This course addresses non-surgical periodontal therapy in terms of expected outcomes, appointment planning, pain control, power instrumentation and supplemental care procedures. Topics include dental materials, periodontal dressings, suture removal and care for acute periodontal conditions.
  
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    DHS 315 - Fundamentals of Electronic Health Records


    1 credit(s)
    Provides an introductory overview of the electronic health record utilized for experiential and patient care within the Pacific Dental Hygiene Clinic. The student will gain hands on practice with the various modules in the electronic health record -forms, dental charting, periodontal charting, treatment planning, chart note entry, referrals, medical consultations, scheduling and personal planner. An emphasis on safeguards for Protected Health Information (PHI) and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) are routinely addressed.  Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 321 - Dental Hygiene Clinic I


    3 credit(s)
    Provides supervised clinical laboratory sessions designed to prepare entry-level clinicians for initiation of clinical patient care, to include all aspects of the dental hygiene process of care. The course includes the application of professionalism and ethics, safety and infection control, and the principles of instrumentation. The student will practice skills using typodont/manikins and student partners. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 322 - Dental Hygiene Clinic II


    3 credit(s)
    Formatted by guided clinic sessions for students to implement the dental hygiene process of care for healthy patients and patients with gingivitis and/or slight periodontitis. The course also includes the principles of instrument sharpening, adjunct clinical procedures (chemotherapeutics, sealants, removable appliance care, intraoral photos), quality assurance measures, and supervised off-site clinical patient care fieldwork. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 323 - Dental Hygiene Clinic III


    1 credit(s)
    This course provides further development of dental hygiene clinical skills with emphasis on non-surgical periodontal therapy and restorative dental procedures. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical setting using teaching manikins, student partners and patients. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 325 - Pain Management


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of anxiety and pain management techniques used in dental care. Components of pain, pain control mechanisms, topical anesthesia, local anesthesia, and nitrous oxide-oxygen sedation are included. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting.
  
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    DHS 330 - Dental Science


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an integrated study of the anatomy, histology and embryonic development of the oral cavity, teeth, head and neck. Emphasis is placed on application of dental science to clinical practice. Learning activities are designed to reinforce course content.
  
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    DHS 333 - Intro to Dental Hygiene Fieldwork


    1 credit(s)
    This course addresses the purpose of fieldwork education and the student’s responsibilities in a fieldwork setting. The student will be oriented to a variety of off-campus affiliation sites in preparation for fieldwork assignments. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 335 - Dental Radiology


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of dental radiology principles and techniques. Topics include x-ray production, radiation safety, exposure techniques, film processing and mounting, radiographic interpretation and patient management. The student will practice skills in a supervised clinical laboratory setting using teaching manikins, student partners and patients.
  
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    DHS 340 - Periodontics


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of the progression and treatment of periodontal disease. Topics include periodontal anatomy, disease classification, etiology, clinical examination, treatment planning, non-surgical periodontal therapy and surgical techniques.
  
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    DHS 342 - Cariology


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of the various microbial, host and dietary factors involved in the etiology, prevention and treatment of dental decay, with an emphasis on risk assessment, treatment planning, and patient counseling.
  
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    DHS 345 - Oral Medicine


    2 credit(s)
    This course presents a systems approach to common medical conditions which includes signs and symptoms, pathophysiology, treatment options and modifications for dental care. Therapeutic drugs are discussed in terms of mechanism of action, indications, effects and dental considerations.
  
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    DHS 355 - Spanish for Dental Professions I


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides an introduction to Hispanic cultures and the use of Spanish language to promote effective dental communication with Spanish-speaking individuals and groups.
  
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    DHS 356 - Spanish for Dental Professions II


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides further development of Spanish language skills to enhance dental communication with Spanish-speaking individuals and groups.
  
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    DHS 360 - Oral Pathology


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of abnormal conditions of the head, neck and oral cavity which includes clinical appearance, etiology and treatment options. Emphasis is placed on common oral lesions and the inter-relationship between oral and systemic conditions.
  
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    DHS 370 - Dental Communication


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides theory and practice in use of interpersonal communication skills for dental health professionals. A primary objective of this course is to empower students to achieve personal and professional goals through the use of effective communication skills.
  
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    DHS 375 - Dental Health Education


    2 credit(s)
    This course addresses health promotion and disease prevention strategies that can be used to assist individuals and groups to improve their oral health. Students are introduced to basic techniques and strategies used in planning and carrying out health education programs in a variety of settings.
  
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    DHS 380 - DH Care for Diverse Populations


    2 credit(s)
    This course addresses the economic, social and cultural issues that affect demand for and access to dental health care. Emphasis is placed on developing awareness, enhancing communication and promoting positive change in health care delivery.
  
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    DHS 395 - Independent Study


    Variable credit(s)
    This course enables the student to pursue an individual research or program development project. May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 414 - DH Care for Patients with Special Needs


    2 credit(s)
    This course addresses dental hygiene care for patients with special dental, medical, physical, and mental conditions.
  
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    DHS 415 - Dental Hygiene Professional Practice


    2 credit(s)
    Explores legal, ethical, and professional aspects of dental hygiene practice including principles of
    ethical decision making, regulation of dentistry, dental hygiene licensure, dental care delivery
    systems, financial policies, employment law, legal concepts, emerging workforce models and
    professional development.
  
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    DHS 416 - Dental Hygiene Career Planning


    1 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of dental hygiene career opportunities and career planning strategies.
  
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    DHS 424 - Dental Hygiene Clinic IV


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides further development of dental hygiene clinical skills with emphasis on providing care to special needs patients. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in a supervised clinical setting. Graded Pass/No Pass
  
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    DHS 425 - Dental Hygiene Clinic V


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides further development of dental hygiene clinical skills with emphasis on self-assessment, evaluation of treatment outcomes and peer review. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in supervised clinical setting. Graded Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 426 - Dental Hygiene Clinic VI


    1 credit(s)
    This course focuses on transition to professional dental hygiene practice with emphasis on comprehensive treatment planning and independent decision making. The student will provide dental hygiene services to patients in a clinical setting with limited supervision. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 434 - Dental Hygiene Fieldwork I


    2 credit(s)
    Provides experiential opportunities to explore the professional roles of the dental hygienist in inter-professional healthcare settings and with diverse population groups. Students will participate in various external fieldwork experiences providing education and clinical care to patients from various cultures, backgrounds, ages, abilities and locations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 435 - Dental Hygiene Fieldwork II


    2 credit(s)
    Provides additional experiential opportunities to explore the professional roles of the dental hygienist in inter-professional healthcare settings and with diverse population groups. Students will participate in various external fieldwork experiences providing education and clinical care to patients from various cultures, backgrounds, ages, abilities and locations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 436 - Dental Hygiene Fieldwork III


    1 credit(s)
    This course provides advanced experiential opportunities to explore the professional roles of the dental hygienist in interprofessional healthcare settings and with diverse population groups. The student will participate in fieldwork at off-campus affiliation sites. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): DHS 416  and DHS 426 .
  
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    DHS 440 - Evidence-Based Dental Hygiene Care


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of the dental research process including problem identification, literature review, research design, data collection, statistical analysis, interpretation of results and presentation of findings. Introduces skills and tools that enable the dental health professional to read and apply scientific literature to clinical practice.
  
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    DHS 445 - Restorative Dental Procedures


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of materials and procedures used in restorative and prosthetic dentistry. Amalgam, composite and provisional restorative materials are included. Laboratory activities are designed to reinforce course content.
  
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    DHS 446 - Restorative Clinic


    1 credit(s)
    This course focuses on application of restorative dental procedures. The student will provide restorative dental services to patients in a supervised clinical setting. Graded Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 448 - Dental Specialties


    1 credit(s)
    Provides discussion of specialty areas in dentistry and the role of the dental hygienist in working with and making referrals to dental specialty practice.This course  provides discussion of restorative dental procedures and specialty dental practices.
    Prerequisite(s): DHS 445 .
  
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    DHS 449 - Restorative Exam Practice


    1 credit(s)
    This elective course will provide an opportunity for students to gain additional practice in placing dental restorations on typodont teeth. Emphasis is placed on preparation for restorative board examination. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    DHS 450 - Dental Public Health


    2 credit(s)
    This course addresses the prevention and treatment of dental disease through community oral health initiatives. Emphasis is placed on assessment of oral health needs, planning and evaluation of dental public health programs, and identification of career opportunities within public health settings.
  
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    DHS 462 - Teaching Strategies for Dental Prof


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of teaching strategies which can be used to convey information to individuals, small groups and large audiences in a variety of academic settings. Resources used to pursue careers in dental hygiene education will be explored. Learning styles, behavioral objectives, teaching methods, instructional materials, teaching psychomotor skills and evaluation of learning are included.
  
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    DHS 465 - Business Management for Dental Prof


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides a study of basic principles of business with emphasis on application of business management skills in dental health care settings. Management styles, organizational structure, strategic planning, finances, marketing, human resources, labor relations, information technology, quality control and risk management are included.
  
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    DHS 470 - Introduction to Independent Practice


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of independent practice for dental hygienists including state regulation, employment opportunities, business models, marketing, reimbursement and community relations.
  
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    DHS 475 - Internship


    Variable credit(s)
    This course enables the student to participate in a workplace experience in a health care or educational setting. May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 480 - Dental Hygiene Practicum


    1 credit(s)
    This course provides the student with an opportunity for professional practice in approved work settings that support the student’s career interests. The student will complete the practicum under the supervision of a staff member within the work setting in consultation with the course instructor. The student will work with the course instructor to develop an individualized learning agreement prior to beginning the practicum. The student will be required to maintain ongoing communication with the course instructor throughout the practicum experience. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 485 - Special Topics


    Varying topics. See department for details.
  
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    DHS 486 - National Board Review


    1 credit(s)
    Will provide an overview of the national board examination that is required for dental hygiene licensure and a review of content that is included in the exam. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 491 - Dental Hygiene Capstone I


    1 credit(s)
    Capstone project that provides the student with an opportunity to pursue concentrated study of a dental-related topic through a research project or develop and implement a community-based program. The student teams will work with a faculty mentor to plan, implement and evaluate their capstone project. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 492 - Dental Hygiene Capstone II


    2 credit(s)
    Capstone project that provides the student with an opportunity to pursue concentrated study of a dental-related topic through a research project or develop and implement a community-based program. The student will complete a final paper and present the capstone project in a public forum. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DHS 495 - Independent Study


    Variable credit(s)
    This course enables the student to pursue an individual research or program development project. May be repeated for credit. Graded Pass/No Pass

Disability Studies

  
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    DS 200 - Introduction to Disability Studies


    2 credit(s)
    Disability Studies understands disability as referring not only to a biological or medical condition, but also to a community of people (the largest minority in the U.S.); to a civil rights movement; to a complex set of social and ethical issues; to a universal human experience; and to the ways cultures respond to different bodies, minds, and behaviors. The class will help students understand disability in its social, cultural, and ethical dimensions. It will sometimes be taught in Hawaii during Winter. Students who have successfully completed ENGW 202 - Writing About Disability  should not take this course.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives.
  
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    DS 204 - Working w/People w/Disability


    4 credit(s)
    Combines theory and practice to strengthen student understanding of the everyday lives of people with disabilities. Time is divided between classroom learning and working directly with kids, teens, and young adults in the larger community. Students choose among a variety of activities, including summer camping on Mt Hood; playing or coaching with Unified Sports of Forest Grove; mentoring recent high school graduates transitioning to adulthood, and more. Though supported by qualified faculty and staff, students have extensive opportunities to be with and learn from members of the disability community.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): DS 204L .
  
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    DS 204L - Working w/People w/Disabilities Lab


    This course is the experiential lab component of DS 204 . DS 204L is a prerequisite for DS 204 . Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DS 211 - Abnormal Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    Students critically explore major categories of disorders, with special emphasis on dissociative identity disorder, depression, schizophrenia, and borderline personality. Questions are raised about the use of psychiatric drugs, and attention is paid to the history of insanity. This course includes both textbook and original readings. Also listed as PSY 211 .
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C.
  
  
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    DS 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    DS 295 - Independent Study


    1 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    DS 307 - Ethics, Medicine & Health Care


    4 credit(s)
    A study of ethical issues that arise in the health care professions. After working through the processes of moral reasoning and learning about some of the major moral theories this course will focus on major topics in health care today. Typically this course deals with such issues as abortion, physician assisted suicide, genetic manipulation and cloning, and comparative health delivery systems. Students will be able to do some independent research on a topic of their choice. Also listed as PHIL 307 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    DS 310 - Disability and Education


    4 credit(s)
    Critically examines the education of people with dis/abilities, focusing on the historical, political, legal, social, and cultural forces that have shaped current policy and practice. Emphasis is placed on understanding education from the lived experience of people with dis/abilities. Includes civic engagement activities intended to identify and address accessibility and inclusivityconcerns in K-12 education. This course is also listed as EDUC 310. Preqrequisite: EDUC 260 and Sophomore Standing (30 or more completed credits) 4 credits.
  
  
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    DS 395 - Independent Study


    1-18 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    DS 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    DS 495 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.

Economics

  
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    ECON 101 - Economics of Social Issues


    4 credit(s)
    Students will develop an understanding of core macroeconomic principles and their application to current problems and issues faced by policymakers. The course will emphasize the macroeconomic policy challenges faced by governments and central banks and describe the various tools available to meet these challenges. The course will examine alternative macroeconomic models used to characterize long-term trends and short-term fluctuations in key economic indicators such as gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, consumer confidence, and deficits.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    ECON 102 - Economics of Markets & Governments


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the basic microeconomic analysis of choice in market based economies shaped by government policy. The course emphasizes the decisions made by individuals, firms, and governments faced with scarce resources. The course examines the limitations of markets in
    dealing with issues such as income inequality, unsustainable resource use, and anti-competitive
    firm practices. The course examines the role played by federal, state, and local governments in influencing market outcomes.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
  
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    ECON 201 - History of Financial Crises


    4 credit(s)
    Analyze how historical events related to colonialism, trade, changing socioeconomic trends, technological, and financial innovation are related to the evolution of financial markets and institutions. At the same time, students will trace the historical evolution of economic thought on the causes and consequences of financial market crises, and analyze the effectiveness of associated policy responses. The emphasis of the course will be on identifying factors common to these crises, and on developing an appropriate conceptual framework with which to explain why financial crises continue to occur. Students who take ECON 201 for credit cannot receive credit for ECON 301.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirement Historical Context
  
  
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    ECON 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ECON 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ECON 301 - Advanced History of Financial Crises


    4 credit(s)
    Will trace the historical evolution of economic thought on the causes and consequences of financial market crises, and analyze the effectiveness of associated policy responses. The emphasis of the course will be on identifying factors common to these crises (low cost of borrowing, lax lending standards, leverage, asset bubbles, moral hazard, lack of transparency, derivatives, government regulations, etc.) and on developing an appropriate conceptual framework with which to explain why financial crises continue to occur. Prerequisite ECON 101 or ECON 102. Students who take ECON 201 for credit cannot receive credit for ECON 301.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirement Historical Context
  
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    ECON 321 - Introduction to Econometrics


    4 credit(s)
    This course is concerned with the use of statistical methods for estimating and testing economic relationships. The course will emphasize the application of classical statistical techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, and regression analysis to economic models. Exploration of problems arising from violations of the classical assumptions. The course incorporates extensive use of statistical software to perform data analysis, regression, and forecasting.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  and ECON 102 
  
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    ECON 327 - Economics Consumers Producers Govrnments


    4 credit(s)
    This course presents rational choice and behavioral economic models of analyzing individual choice in the presence of scarcity. The understanding of firms begins with the study of production technology and costs and proceeds to the study of firm conduct in different market settings. Throughout the course, students study of the economic efficiency of market outcomes and the effect of government policy on social goals relating to efficiency and equity. Great emphasis will be placed on the use of mathematical tools to study economic outcomes.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101  and ECON 102 .
  
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    ECON 328 - Macroeconomics Found Govt/Cntrl Bank Policy


    4 credit(s)
    Students will gain an understanding of the origins and distinguishing characteristics of alternative schools of thought in macroeconomics. Development of closed and open economy macroeconomic models used to characterize long-term trends and short-term fluctuations in gross domestic product, unemployment, inflation, and government and international deficits. Application of quantitative methods to analyze relationships among key economic indicators, examination of current economic policy challenges, and prediction of policy outcomes based on competing macroeconomic theories.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 ECON 102 , and MATH 125 
  
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    ECON 331 - Money and Banking


    4 credit(s)
    Analysis of the nature and functions of money and effects of changes in the money supply; operation of commercial banks, the Federal Reserve System, and the Treasury that affect the United States’ monetary system; monetary theory; critique of various monetary policies.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 101 .
  
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    ECON 333W - Environmental Economics


    4 credit(s)
    Environmental economics studies the role in the economic system of environmental amenities such as clean air and clear water. The course analyzes the problems of market outcomes when such amenities are not priced. The problems associated with estimating economic costs and benefits are also carefully examined. The course emphasizes the connection between economic understanding and improved public policy. Also listed as ENV 333W .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 102 .
 

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