Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

English Writing

  
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    ENGW 497 - Senior Seminar: Creative Writing


    2 credit(s)
    Creative Writing majors will study and write about the work of a writer or writers, addressing craft or technique, including influences upon that writer and the work(s).
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed); and ENGW 306 , ENGW 308 , ENGW 309 , or ENGW 310.
  
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    ENGW 498 - Senior Seminar: Creative Writing


    2 credit(s)
    Creative Writing majors will study and write about the work of a writer or writers, addressing craft or technique, including influences upon that writer and the work(s).
    Prerequisite(s): ENGW 497 .

Environmental

  
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    ENV 100 - Environmental Studies Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    The study of the environment encompasses a broad field that links theory from many disciplines to applications in human society. This course provides a survey of both the major issues in environmental science and the environmental professions that address these issues. Faculty and outside speakers from government and private industry will make presentations and lead discussions. The structure of environmental regulation and management in the U.S. will be described.
  
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    ENV 121 - Our Global Environment


    4 credit(s)
    This course will cover scientific views of the major environmental issues facing the planet as well as solutions to these problems according to current scientific research. Students will read from a variety of sources (science, policy, economics, and ethics), so students can understand the complexity of environmental problems. This course will include environmental awareness/activism projects.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Sustainability, Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
  
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    ENV 131 - Intro to Environmental Issues in Hawaii


    2 credit(s)
    This pre-trip course for Environmental Issues in Hawaii (ENV 132 ) will use readings, lecture, and discussion to introduce students to Hawaiian culture and the plant and animal communities of the Hawaiian island arc. Participants will learn about common species in local habitats ranging from the coast to the forested volcanoes. We will use ecology, life history, and behavior to build frameworks that define tropical terrestrial and marine communities. We will explore Hawaiian history and investigate the cultural connections that bind Hawaiian people such as the kua’ina to the natural world. By identifying connections between culture, geology, climate and the biotic realm, students will gain a better understanding of the interplay between people and this unique landscape.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Sustainability.
  
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    ENV 132 - Environmental Issues in Hawaii


    2 credit(s)
    Among the most remote islands on the planet, the Hawaiian Islands provide a remarkable location for studying biological and human dimensions of the environment. Students will have a unique opportunity to learn about issues and solutions relating to cultural modification of landscapes, land use and conservation policies, development, resource production and other key environmental global topics by studying the Hawaiian landscape. This field course, taught on the Big Island and Oahu, will aim to connect academic discussion of the meaning of sustainability to real-life environmental challenges facing island ecosystems.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 131 .
  
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    ENV 141 - Permaculture Design Science


    4 credit(s)
    Permaculture is about designing ecological human habitats and food production systems. It is a land use and community building movement, which strives for the harmonious integration of human dwellings, microclimate, annual and perennial plants, animals, soils, and water into stable, productive communities. The focus is not on these elements themselves, but rather on the relationships created among them by the way we place them in the landscape. This synergy is further enhanced by mimicking patterns found in nature. This course is designed to help students understand the basic principles of permaculture through classroom lectures and hands-on experience.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World, Sustainability.
  
  
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    ENV 160 - Energy & the Environment


    4 credit(s)
    In order to live, humans require energy, and methods of energy production significantly affect the environment in which humans live. This course examines fundamental thermodynamic concepts such as energy and power and then explores the comparative environmental costs and benefits, including potential long term consequences, of producing energy from various sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear reactors, wood burning, solar panels, wind turbines, etc. Methods of estimation and risk assessment are emphasized so that meaningful comparisons between energy sources and their environmental consequences can be made. Also listed as PHY 160 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    ENV 170 - Intro to Geographical Informational Sys


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed for both newcomers to the field of GIS who want to understand the concepts and technology and for students with some knowledge of GIS who want to go beyond the software manuals to understand the fundamental concepts of GIS. Through lecture we will explore the basic concepts of mapping and spatial databases and their use in fields ranging from land-use planning to ecological research. Students will also gain a working knowledge of GIS software through the use of ArcView GIS, the most widely used GIS software package.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    ENV 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ENV 200 - Sustainability Science


    4 credit(s)
    Sustainability Science probes interactions between global, social, and human systems, the complex mechanisms that lead to degradation of these systems, and concomitant risks to human well-being. Understanding the near-term and long-term effects of these actions on the quality of the environment requires a broad view of the science on how the earth functions without human intervention, and how society has changed these functions to support itself. Includes laboratory and field experiences.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World, Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 100  (or concurrent enrollment).
  
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    ENV 201 - Agroecology Methods


    2 credit(s)
    Food is one of the platforms of life that all humans need in order to survive. Yet, currently, many systems of agriculture production are harming humans, animals, insects, and the plants they cultivate. In this class, we will examine sustainable agriculture production systems from around the world, and compare and contrast how they handle the challenges of the modern age. Students will develop basic respect for the forces of nature and how they interact in ways that can lead to environmental problems when not understood. Practical applications of horticulture, soil science, systems thinking, economics, and environmental management will be a part of the coursework and associated fieldwork.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

  
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    ENV 204 - Sustainable Use: Soil & Water


    4 credit(s)
    Soil and water are interconnected systems, but the current global use of them is not sustainable. Students in this course will learn about the properties of these systems in undisturbed natural ecosystems, current problems facing the quality and quantity of these systems, and methods used to assess the health of these systems. Students will also learn techniques for sustainable practices for these systems. Includes laboratory and field experiences.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Quantitative Reasoning, Sustainability.
  
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    ENV 210 - Tropical Environmental Biology


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the effects of human activity on natural environments associated with Third World, developing countries (i.e. Belize and Guatemala, Central America). A variety of ecosystems and areas will be studied, including lowland savannas, tropical seasonal forests, limestone caves, coastal lagoons, mangrove swamps, sea-grass flats, coral reefs and urban and rural societies. The course meets during the spring, in order to present lectures and background materials, which will prepare students for activities in Belize and Guatemala in May. Additional fee required. Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    ENV 222 - Environmental Literature


    4 credit(s)
    Environmental Literature aims to critically examine our relationship to nature through the study of major American nature writers. We will consider each writer’s ability to generate environmental thought (historically, politically, philosophically) and to survey how nature writing as a genre has taken its current form. The course hopes to acknowledge and challenge current assumptions on nature such as how wilderness has shaped the American imagination and even how labeling nature as “Mother Earth” implies a great deal of how we perceive and receive nature now. Also listed as ENGL 222 
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    ENV 224 - Environmental Politics


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces students to environmental disputes and the forces that affect environmental policy. Topics include the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy, and an extensive case study of a local environmental issue. Also listed as POLS 224 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
  
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    ENV 228 - Sustainable Systems


    2 credit(s)
    This course will explore the diversity of sustainable systems used to reduce human impacts on the planet and start to develop a focus in one or more areas of interest in this diverse discipline. Students will delve into a variety of literary sources on sustainable systems and gather background information on areas of interest related to sustainability. In addition, students will do site visits, employee interviews, and initiate hands-on experiences in one or more areas of sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 100 .
  
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    ENV 233 - Interpersonal Sustainability Leadership


    2 credit(s)
    Personal leadership development is a life-long experience. This course will help students develop an understanding of themselves and others to become effective leaders, followers, and team members in a variety of personal and social contexts. Personality and leadership learning assessments will be used to help build a personal toolkit for current and future involvement in projects, causes and learning. This course includes taking a personality assessment inventory, self-development activities, and leadership observations.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
  
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    ENV 234 - Organizational Sustainability Leadership


    2 credit(s)
    Will apply principles of personal leadership to organizations and communities. Students will: develop skills for successful teams at work and in volunteer settings; build a toolkit for meeting management, group decision-making, and planning; and practice leadership principles using real-time situations and case studies. This course includes a team project, self-reflection activities, and organizational observations.
  
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    ENV 250 - Frameworks of Sustainability


    2 credit(s)
    Focuses on the theories, principles, and conceptual applications of sustainability, with emphases on the importance of context, justice, and transdisciplinary thinking. Students will be exposed to the tensions over how to operationalize sustainability, and will examine how many of today’s most pressing sustainability issues are wicked. Wicked problem frames understand sustainability issues as having a multiplicity of stakeholders, no one size fits all solution (rather, good, better, or best), influenced by a constellation of complex sociopolitical factors, and context dependent. As a class, we will engage with the questions, What is sustainable? For whom is a policy or practice sustainable? Why is sustainability valuable? How do we implement sustainable practices?
    Core Requirement(s): Sustainability
  
  
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    ENV 260 - Oregon Natural History


    4 credit(s)
    Oregon Natural History will introduce students to the plant and animal communities of the Pacific Northwest. Participants will learn to identify common species in local habitats ranging from the coast to the Cascades. We will use ecology, life history, and behavior to investigate the interactions that define communities. By exploring connections between geology, climate, and the biotic realm, students will gain a better understanding of and appreciation for the biodiversity of this region.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Natural Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Sustainability.
  
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    ENV 265 - Biodiversity & Ecosystem Resilience


    4 credit(s)
    Accelerating rates of environmental change and the continued loss of global biodiversity threaten the health of the world’s ecosystems and jeopardize ecosystem services that benefit humankind. This course will explore the meaning of biodiversity and ask how it is perceived, valued, measured, and protected. Can biodiversity be conserved while also meeting human needs now and into the future? Through the assessment of ecosystem resilience (the maintenance of ecosystem functions and services under stress), the risk of system failure can be determined. The maintenance of biodiversity is necessary for the long-term resilience of living systems in a world undergoing dramatic change.
  
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    ENV 270 - Geospatial Analysis using GIS


    4 credit(s)
    The course will provide students with a basic knowledge of geographical information systems including sources of GIS data, various data models, capturing GIS data and manipulating GIS data. Concepts in geography, spatial data, analysis of spatial information, real-world applications, and map creation will be included. During this course students will gain a working knowledge of GIS software through the use of ArcGIS, the most widely used GIS software package.
  
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    ENV 275 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ENV 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ENV 311 - Technology of Sustainable Agriculture


    2 credit(s)
    Farming is one of the oldest professions on earth, and yet as we move into the 21st century, there are many ways in which technology can be and is currently applied in both traditional and modern agriculture systems to make them more sustainable. We will examine a myriad of technologies (both sophisticated and simple) used in agriculture, how they work, and why they are important to productive systems. Significant course time will be devoted to lecture and fieldwork on modern soil testing technology (such as ISE, XRF, NIR), plant testing technology (chlorophyll, tissue, sap, genetics), UAV’s, informatics resources, nutrient delivery systems, precision sensors, agricultural robotics, and more. We will also examine the impact of low-tech solutions often used in developing nations such as shade cloth, greenhouses, biofuels, nutrient extractions, and other low-impact technology.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 201 .
  
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    ENV 312 - Sustainable Ag in the Global Economy


    2 credit(s)
    There is mounting concern in the scientific and technological communities about how to feed the growing world population in the near future. We will focus on modern agriculture in the context of a global economy interconnected by natural resources. The basics of operations management, marketing, food safety, small business accounting, and business analysis as applied to agricultural systems will receive significant course time through lecture, discussion and fieldwork. Students will also learn strategies for assessing the sustainability and financial viability of a number of advanced growing methods as well as the basics of implementing these techniques.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 201 .
  
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    ENV 313 - Psychology of Sustainability


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an overview of psychological research in environmental attitudes, conservation, sustainability, effects of the environment on human behavior and well-being, and how to design and implement programs to promote ecologically aware behaviors. Course will include seminar discussion, travel for field trips, and community-based programming. Also listed as PSY 313 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    ENV 320 - Advanced Tropical Environmental Biology


    4 credit(s)
    An in depth study in the effects of human activity on tropical ecosystems associated with developing countries, and current environmental science research in tropical ecosystems. A variety of tropical ecosystems will be studied with an emphasis on tropical seasonal forests and marine ecosystems. The course meets once a week during the spring semester, in order to present lectures and background materials, which will prepare students for activities in Belize and Guatemala in May. Students will be assigned outside readings from peer-reviewed scientific research articles and text books dealing with environmental impacts on tropical ecosystems. Students will be required to demonstrate their knowledge of this material in addition to the material that is required for students taking ENV 210  (Tropical Environmental Biology for Nonscience majors). Students will participate in hands-on field research, design research proposals, and learn environmental problem solving through a case study approach. This will be in addition to the daily requirements for students in ENV 210 . Additional fee required.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 200  and BIOL 200  or BIOL 201  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    ENV 321 - Environmental Ethics


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the key concepts in environmental ethics, such as biodiversity loss, corporate responsibility, animal rights, over-population, and environmental racism. Also listed as PHIL 321 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ENV 322 - Animal Ethics


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of the relationship between human and non-human animals. What is the moral standing of non-human animals? We will study both the theoretical and practical facets of this question by focusing on the ethical dilemmas and practices involving animals, including animal experimentation, factory farming, and companion animals. Also listed as PHIL 322 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Sustainability and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above(30 or more completed credits).
  
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    ENV 324 - Special Topics in Sustainable Design


    1-4 credit(s)
    Courses of varying formats on specific topics not included in the regular curriculum such as natural building, sustainable agriculture, plant propagation, kinship gardening, animal forage systems, tool building, social entrepreneurship and renewable energy. The topic of this course changes from year to year and is selected by the instructor and approved by the Environmental Studies Department. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 142 and ENV 200 .
  
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    ENV 330 - Ecosystems & Ecological Design


    4 credit(s)
    Ecosystems and Ecological Design will explore the application of ecological principles to the design of sustainable technologies, buildings, communities and landscapes. The strategies of conservation, sustainability and stewardship can be applied at all scales to produce revolutionary forms of buildings, landscapes and applied technologies. The course is focused on understanding how ecological knowledge informs the design process. Fundamental ecological concepts such as primary production, energy flow, nutrient cycles, community structure and ecosystem stability are used as the foundation for exploring process is introduced in the form of participatory methods for design. Laboratory exercises and group projects provide opportunities for experiential learning through the application of ecological design principles to the solution of real problems, with particular focus on the Pacific University campus and its surroundings. Ecological design will enable us to realize that environmental problems are largely problems of design.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 142 and ENV 200 .
  
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    ENV 333W - Environmental Economics


    4 credit(s)
    Environmental economics studies the role of environmental amenities such as clean air and clean water in the economic system. This course analyzes the problems of market outcomes when such amenities are not priced. The problems associated with estimating economic costs and benefits are also carefully examined. Throughout the course, the connection between economic understanding and improved public policy is emphasized. The course will include a lab section which will be devoted in large measure to experiences in the field. Also listed as ECON 333W .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ECON 102 .
  
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    ENV 335 - Education for Sustainability


    4 credit(s)
    Guided by the nine core content standards for Education for Sustainability; students will explore and experience formal, non-formal, and informal methods for engaging citizens in learning and participating in life-long stewardship. Includes a self-driven focus, a team project and field trips.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 233 , ENV 234 , and EDUC 260 .
  
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    ENV 340 - Restoration Ecology


    4 credit(s)
    Restoration ecology seeks to enhance the natural recovery of damaged ecosystems. Through lectures, readings, and field/lab work, we will review the conceptual bases of restoration ecology, investigate the tools used by restoration ecologists to solve practical problems, and discuss the scope and success of actual restoration projects. Working with local partners, students will independently produce a restoration plan for a degraded region that includes an assessment of baseline conditions, development of an ecological model, restoration goals, project implementation, monitoring, and budgeting. Previously Listed As: Previously offered as ENV 230.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 200  or BIOL 200 .
  
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    ENV 344 - Environmental Toxicology


    2 credit(s)
    Pollutants impact the structure and function of ecological systems at all levels of biological organization. This course will focus on the effects of toxicants on ecological structures, from the molecular to the individual organism to the community and the ecosystem.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300 .
  
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    ENV 352 - Gender and the Environment


    4 credit(s)
    Multi-disciplinary course that concentrates on the key debates and theoretical approaches involved in understanding how identities (e.g. gender, race/ethnicity, class, migration, etc.) form and inform our experiences of the environment, and how these experiences are reflected in practices and institutions. Topics will include environmental justice, international development, rurality, western positivism and indigenous knowledges, and environmental identities in press and film. The readings and other materials used in the class are global (north and south, and post-colonial perspectives). Students will apply concepts through discussion, reflection exercises, and an independent research paper.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): ENV 121 , ENV 200  or Junior standing (60 or more completed credits).
  
  
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    ENV 361 - Lab Techniques Env Toxicology & Chem


    1 credit(s)
    Changes in the environment are ultimately the result of chemical processes. This laboratory course examines our understanding of chemical change in various environmental compartments from a practical perspective. Methodology for monitoring and modeling these systems will be utilized, including standard toxicity testing, use of biomarkers, tissue, air, water and soil analyses, and molecular techniques.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300 .
  
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    ENV 380W - Environmental Problem Solving


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to help students understand the complexity of environmental problems. Students will put together a comprehensive project proposal for an independent research project that they will complete as part of their senior capstone. Students will also listen to guest lectures from experts in the field that are involved with environmental problem solving.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits) and ENV 200 .
  
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    ENV 390W - Community Engaged Research


    2 credit(s)
    A collaborative process between researchers and communities wherein questions and aims are created together. The overarching goal of this methodology is to connect theory to praxis, and in so doing increase the applicability of research findings to community well-being. Research design in these projects, which are location- or case-specific, place significance on local ways of knowing, and gauge the success of research in terms of what partner-communities do with the co-produced knowledge. This course will focus on understanding the ethics of engagement and design approaches. Once for credit.
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    ENV 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    ENV 424 - Conservation Biology


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an introduction to conservation biology. It will include an examination of the historical and ethical background of the conservation movement, and trace the development of the science of conservation biology.  We will be making connections between society and the natural world, relating human impacts on plants and wildlife to the goals of the practicing conservation biologist.  We will focus on biodiversity, with an emphasis on monitoring and maintenance.  We will review and develop the ecological concepts that are the foundation of conservation biology, and will learn quantitative methods used to determine and predict the status of plant and animal populations.  Furthermore, we will investigate the interplay between science, policy and culture that defines the success or failure of conservation efforts.  This is a lab/field course that will combine in-class computer simulations using R with opportunities to learn first-hand from conservation efforts in our region. Previously Listed As: ENV 325.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): CS 130 BIOL 315  or BIOL 317 BIOL 314 .  MATH 226  strongly recommended.
  
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    ENV 441W - Environmental History


    4 credit(s)
    This course focuses on historical scholarship that has addressed the changing relationship between human societies and “nature”. The course explores the development of ecological science and environmental politics; it also explores the ways in which Americans of European and indigenous background imposed their understandings on the landscape, and the consequences of these impositions. Other subjects include National Park Service policy, game conservation and class conflict, and the development of governmental agencies dedicated to protecting or controlling the environment. Also listed as HIST 441W .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Sustainability and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    ENV 462 - Special Topics Env Toxicology & Chem


    1 credit(s)
    This course involves presentations of research findings in environmental toxicology and chemistry by invited scientists and Pacific University faculty and presentation and discussion of literature research by students.
    Prerequisite(s): CHEM 300 .
  
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    ENV 475 - Internship


    1-14 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    ENV 480 - Project Management


    2 credit(s)
    Provides leadership and management guidelines for project management with a focus on sustainability and the environment. Strategies for effective planning, communication, motivation and execution throughout the duration of the project will be investigated. Project Management presents principles of project control from initiation through closure in a clear and practical manner.
    Prerequisite(s): ENV 380W .
  
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    ENV 490 - Capstone Experience


    2 credit(s)
    Designed to allow students to expand on research projects or internships by more thoroughly examining the primary literature, reanalyzing data, writing an annotated bibliography and presenting in a public forum. Instructor’s consent required.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed credits) and approved project.
  
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    ENV 495 - Research


    1-6 credit(s)
    Faculty supervised, student-conducted, individual research project. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit.

French

  
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    FREN 101 - Intro to French Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    The beginning course is intended to give training in the basic patterns and structures of French. Conversation and reading related to the cultures of French-speaking areas. Classroom work is supplemented by laboratory experience.
  
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    FREN 102 - Intro French Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    Continuation of FREN 101 . The beginning course is intended to give training in the basic patterns and structures of French. Conversation and reading related to the cultures of French-speaking areas. Classroom work is supplemented by laboratory experience.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 101  or placement.
  
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    FREN 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French


    4 credit(s)
    Focus on conversational skills, and comprehension French and francophone cultures, reading, and grammar.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102  or placement.
  
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    FREN 202 - Intermediate French


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of FREN 201 . Focus on conversational skills, comprehension, French and francophone cultures, reading, and grammar.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 201  or placement.
  
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    FREN 215 - Conversation Laboratory


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to compliment 200-level and upper-division French language courses and provide additional opportunity for improving speaking and writing skills, although students who have completed at least 102 in French are eligible to enroll. Students will participate in weekly discussions and oral activities and produce presentations and written work in French. Course taught entirely in French. Does not count towards the French major or minor. May be repeated once for credit. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Offered spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): FREN 102  or placement.
  
  
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    FREN 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    FREN 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    FREN 304W - French & Francophone Theatre


    4 credit(s)
    Analysis of representative plays by French and Francophone authors including Jarry, Sartre, Anouilh, Genet, Beckett, Ionesco, Schwarz-Bart, and others. Introduction of theoretical texts relevant to the plays studied. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts, International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    FREN 308W - France Today


    4 credit(s)
    Reading and discussion of selected articles from French newspapers and magazines. Course work would be supplemented by relevant video and audio-visual materials. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    FREN 309 - French Popular Culture


    4 credit(s)
    French popular culture shapes most discussions of both private and public spheres of the everyday French experience. From recreational to professional settings, popular culture is a vessel for engaging and being engaged with others. A firm grasp of French popular culture is a prerequisite to understanding and integrating into French society. By examining a wide variety of aspects of French popular culture, this course prepares students for travel in France and furthers the knowledge and cultural awareness needed to thrive in conversational French with contemporary French citizens.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspective.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or equivalent proficiency.
  
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    FREN 311W - Composition & Conversation


    4 credit(s)
    Practice in conversational idiom through reading and discussion of contemporary short stories, periodical literature and oral interviews. Extensive practice in composition with an aim toward improving students’ communicative skills in written and oral French. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    FREN 312 - French Pronunciation/Intonation


    4 credit(s)
    This course offers students studying French the opportunity to improve their pronunciation skills, as well as listening comprehension through the study of phonetics and practice of intonation and pronunciation patterns.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    FREN 315 - Discovery of France


    4 credit(s)
    Culminating in a travel experience to Paris and one or two other regions from France, this course explores contemporary France and French culture through the lenses of a specific discipline, such as media arts, photography, and history, among other possibilities. Part of the course will be taught in French by a French professor, and the other part, in English, by a professor who specializes in the elected discipline. May be repeated once for credit with instructor permission.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    FREN 320 - Women’s Writing in Francophone World


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of women’s writing in the Francophone world throughout the 20th century. Special focus on the novel and the development of alternative prose forms. Authors from France, Switzerland, Belgium, Quebec, the French Caribbean, Senegal, and Algeria may be included. Taught in French. Also listed as GSS 321 .
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
  
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    FREN 370 - Travel Prep: Discovery of France & Beyond


    2 credit(s)
    Come discover France or a French-speaking destination through the lens of a particular theme (ex: cuisine) or discipline (ex: theater, media arts, anthropology).  This course is preparation for a 10-14 day short-term travel course to France or a Francophone region (FREN 371  or HUM 371  ).  Destination and theme may vary with each offering. Students wishing to travel are required to take this 2-credit preparation course.

    FREN 370 counts toward French major/minor. Also listed as HUM 370  
    Offered: Every other year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202 .  

  
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    FREN 371 - Travel: Discovery of France & Beyond


    2 credit(s)
    Come discover France or a French-speaking destination through the lens of a particular theme (ex: cuisine) or discipline (ex: theater, media arts, anthropology). This course is a 10-14 day short-term travel course to France or a Francophone region. Destination and theme may vary with each offering.

    FREN 371 counts toward the French major. Also listed as HUM 371 
    Offered: Every other year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 370   or HUM 370  

  
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    FREN 385 - Seminar in French


    4 credit(s)
    A concentrated study of one of the major movements in French and Francophone literature, art, and culture. Topics include: the rise of Classicism, the French Revolution, the 19th century French novel, writing and resistance: 1848-1968, and literature in French-speaking Switzerland. Taught in French. May be repeated for credit.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog) and International Perspectives.
  
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    FREN 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    FREN 404W - French & Francophone Theatre


    4 credit(s)
    Analysis of representative plays by French and Francophone authors including Jarry, Sartre, Anouilh, Genet, Beckett, Ionesco, Schwarz-Bart, and others. Introduction of theoretical texts relevant to the plays studied. Students taking the course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that require more expertise in French. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts, International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level FREN courses or 12 upper-division earned overseas in a French-speaking country.
  
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    FREN 408W - France Today


    4 credit(s)
    Reading and discussion of selected articles from French newspapers and magazines. Course work would be supplemented by relevant video and audio -visual materials. Students taking the course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that require more expertise in French. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level FREN courses or 12 upper-division earned overseas in a French-speaking country.
  
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    FREN 409 - French Popular Culture


    4 credit(s)
    French popular culture shapes most discussions of both private and public spheres of the everyday French experience. From recreational to professional settings, popular culture is a vessel for engaging and being engaged with others. A firm grasp of french popular culture is a prerequisite to understanding and integrating into French society. By examining a wide variety of aspects of French popular culture, this course will allow study abroad returnees in French to reflect upon and strengthen their knowledge and cultural awareness of contemporary France and its citizens.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspective.
    Prerequisite(s): Completion of Study Abroad requirement for the French Major or equivalent.
  
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    FREN 411 - Composition & Conversation


    4 credit(s)
    Practice in conversational idiom through reading and discussion of contemporary short stories, periodical literature and oral interviews. Extensive practice in composition with an aim toward improving students’ communicative skills in written and oral French. Students taking this course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that will require more expertise in French. Taught in French.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level FREN courses or 12 upper-division earned overseas in a French-speaking country.
  
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    FREN 420 - Women’s Writing in Francophone World


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of women’s writing in the Francophone world throughout the 20th century. Special focus on the novel and the development of alternative prose forms. Authors from France, Switzerland, Belgium, Quebec, the French Caribbean, Senegal, and Algeria may be included. Students taking the course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that require more expertise in French. Taught in French. Also listed as GSS 421 .
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level FREN courses or 12 upper-division earned overseas in a French-speaking country.
  
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    FREN 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    FREN 485 - Seminar in French


    4 credit(s)
    A concentrated study of one of the major movements in French and Francophone literature, art, and culture. Topics include: the rise of Classicism, the French Revolution, the 19th century French novel, writing and resistance: 1848-1968, and literature in French-speaking Switzerland. Students taking the course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that require more expertise in French. Taught in French. May be repeated for credit.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog) and International Perspectives.
  
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    FREN 494 - Senior Thesis French


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to assist senior students who are writing a thesis for a major in French. Students will receive direction in completing their research proposal and help in conducting and writing their senior thesis in French. These are student-conducted individual research theses. Students take 494 and 495 in consecutive semesters. Taught in French.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed credits) and study abroad.
  
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    FREN 495 - Senior Thesis in French


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to assist senior students who are writing a thesis for a major in French. Students will receive direction in completing their research proposal and help in conducting and writing their senior thesis in French. These are student-conducted individual research theses. Students take 494 and 495 in consecutive semesters. Taught in French.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 494 .

Gender and Sexuality Studies

  
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    GSS 200 - Introduction to Queer Studies


    4 credit(s)
    This course will provide an overview of queer communities through an interdisciplinary approach including a focus on the intersections of ethnicity, class, culture, sex and gender among gay, lesbian, bisexual, trans and other sexual and gender identities. Theoretical, political, historical, and social frameworks will inform the basis of learning how queer communities negotiate identities outside of the hegemonic mainstream concepts of sexuality and gender.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Diverse Perspectives, Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    GSS 201 - Introduction to Gender & Sexuality Studies


    4 credit(s)
    This introductory level course explores the various foundations of gender and sexuality studies with an interdisciplinary focus. The course aims to explore several issues of gender and sexuality in the media, cinema, literature, and theory. Students review and critique the construction of gender and sexuality under patriarchy in the past and study similar yet different structures of power in current discourse. The course consists of two components: a classroom experience with an emphasis on the breadth of literature on feminism, queer theory, and masculinities, and field work in the community.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Diverse Perspectives, Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    GSS 206 - Sex, Gender, Culture


    4 credit(s)
    In all societies, people organize social relationships and identities, ideologies and symbolic systems, in terms of gender and sexuality, but they do so in different ways. In this course, we will examine the ways in which individuals and societies imagine, experience, impose and challenge gender and sexuality systems in a diversty of cultural contexts, including those of the United States, Oceania, Africa, and Asia. One of the aims throughout the course will be to explore other societies as a means of better understanding and critiquing our own. Also listed as ANTH 206 .
    Offered: Offered triennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives, International Perspective, and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): GSS 201 , ANTH 101 , SOC 101, SOC 102, SOC 110 , SOC 120 , or SOC 130 .
  
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    GSS 211 - Preparation for Travel in India


    2 credit(s)
    This is a course that will prepare students for Travel in India: Gender, Culture and Service, a Winter III course sponsored by the Center for Gender Equity. This course will provide students with the information necessary to help them get the most of their WIII experience. The content will cover the basic history, religion, culture, geography, and politics of India. Also listed as HUM 211 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    GSS 212 - Theatre for Gender Equity


    2 credit(s)
    This workshop course will devise new work or engage with existing texts to present theatrical performance on a given theme and in accord with the mission of the Center for Gender Equity. Also listed as THEA 212 . May be repeated once for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Artistic Practice and Creative Process.
  
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    GSS 220 - Literature and Human Concerns


    4 credit(s)
    See the Gender and Sexuality Studies department for the course description. May be repeated once for credit.
  
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    GSS 225 - Peer Health Education


    4 credit(s)
    Prepares students to facilitate workshops on healthy relationships and interpersonal violence prevention. Students explore the root causes of interpersonal violence using theorietical frameworks from public health, social work and feminist theory. As part of the course students facilitate the Safe Dates curriculum at alternative high schools. Also listed as CIV 225 
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
  
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    GSS 265 - Gender, Sexuality, & Sport


    2 credit(s)
    This course examines the intersection of culturally-based gender ideologies within the systems of sport and physical activity across various competitive levels. Sport continues to be an expression of dominant masculinity and shapes the (hetero)gender binary system. This course will examine and investigate the intersections between gender, race, and sexuality using a variety of theoretical frameworks (e.g., feminism, critical race theory, queer theory) while considering the history of sport and Title IX, relative to women’s emergence into athletics, and the commonalities and differences of men’s and women’s experiences in sport. Counts toward Diverse Perspectives core requirement.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    GSS 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    GSS 280 - Women, Gender, and Sexuality in Art


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the representation of women, gender, and sexuality in visual culture. It examines how these constructs are relevant to the creation, patronage, and appreciation of art in various cultures in history. It places an emphasis on current discourses, including Feminist art analysis and issues of race and sexual orientation as they pertain to the artists or works being considered. Also listed as ARTHI 280 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    GSS 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    GSS 300 - Special Topics in Gender & Sexuality


    2-4 credit(s)
    This is a special topics course focusing on the specific interests of the faculty and students in the Gender and Sexuality Studies minor program. Topics addressed in the course will be derived from a variety of disciplinary standpoints, and may involve interdisciplinary collaboration. Some examples of topics that may be offered through this course are: “The Development of Gender,” “Women and Film,” and “Feminist Epistemology” to name a few. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Prerequisite(s): GSS 201   or GSS 303 
  
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    GSS 302 - Multi-Media for Sexual Health Promotion


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides students with skills and experience in planning and executing a multi-media health campaign as applied to contemporary sexual health issues. The course includes the development of useful sexual health messages based on community needs, exploration of various mass communication strategies, technical experience in the use of various media sources, a critical understanding of the theoretical foundations for intervention methods, as well as media-based intervention evaluation. Students will have an opportunity to take an active role in creating their own interventions as well as exploring personal attitudes and values surrounding sexual health messages. Content areas may include public service announcements, film and drama, web-based and social media (Blogs, website, YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter), one-on-one education via tabling events, print, radio, or podcast. Particular attention will be paid to the practical application of communication and learning theories, collaborative relationships, and strategies for dealing with potential challenges.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior Standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    GSS 303 - Advanced Gender and Sexuality Theory


    4 credit(s)
    This course will expand upon, and develop a more advanced understanding of, the academic discourses and theories of gender and sexuality introduced in GSS 201 . We will draw on a range of theoretical frameworks, including post-Marxism, poststructuralism, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, and queer theory, in order to address social concerns and analyze gender themes in the media, cinema, and literature. We will explore the ways in which the concept of gender is socially constructed through institutional power arrangements, popular culture representations, and everyday social dynamics, and examine how contemporary feminist theory differs from the early feminist movement. Discussions will address questions such as: what does it mean to “queer” cultural norms or political traditions and how does queer and feminist theory enable a more broad and inclusive discussion of politics in contemporary society. Also listed as PSJ 303.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog); International and Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): At least two upper division GSS courses.
  
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    GSS 306 - Advanced Peer Education


    0-2 credit(s)
    This course provides experiential learning opportunities for students in their role as Wellness Educators. Throughout the course students will facilitate 90 minute “Let’s Talk About Sex & Pizza” Workshops with all incoming students by Residence Halls. Students will continue developing knowledge and skills requisite to providing individual and community-based peer health education, fostering a healthy campus culture, and empowering positive change.  Emphasis will be placed on the application of health education models of individual and community behavior change, communication and conflict resolution skills, providing culturally sensitive and relevant education, crisis recognition and strategies for providing appropriate referrals. Students will build leadership, group facilitation and presentation skills throughout the course. May be repeated for credit. Previously Listed As: CIV 330 and SOCWK 306.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts as Core requirement: Civic Engagement.
    Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 225  
  
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    GSS 308 - Advanced Peer Facilitation: Athletics


    0-2 credit(s)
    Provides experiential learning opportunities for students in their role as peer facilitators. Students will co-facilitate workshops on consent and bystander intervention with athletic teams. Throughout the course students will continue developing knowledge and skills requisite to providing individual and community based peer education to prevent interpersonal violence. Emphasis will be placed on the application of theoretical frameworks, self-reflection, and leadership and facilitation skills. May be repeated once for credit. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GSS 225 . Instructor’s Consent required.
  
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    GSS 309 - Families


    4 credit(s)
    The primary emphasis is on the relationship between the familial institution and the society in which it is being studied. Attention is given to trans-historical and cross-cultural data and how social change impacts the institution. Additional areas of investigation include definitions of the family, socialization, cohabitation, courtship, marriage, divorce, gender and sex roles, sexuality, socio-economic forces, family violence, alternative forms, and the future of the family. Also listed as SOC 309 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Sciences (2010-17 catalogs); Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 101, SOC 102, SOC 110 , SOC 120 , SOC 130 , or SOC 150 .
 

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