Sep 28, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Gender and Sexuality Studies

  
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    GSS 310 - Travel in India: Gender Society Service


    2 credit(s)
    This is the preparatory course for GSS 311  Travel in India: Gender and Society, which occurs in the following term. The course introduces major themes related to gender and society in South Asia and familiarizes students with the mechanics of travel in Tamil Nadu.  Students do preliminary research on topics such as history, religion, culture, geography, and politics and discuss best practices for safe and ethical travel.  Successful completion of the course may require obtaining travel documents and paying the associated fees. Also listed as HUM 310 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Civic Engagement (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): HUM 211  or GSS 211  
  
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    GSS 311 - Medicine, Body and Culture


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to critical areas of inquiry in medical anthropology. By examining the socio-cultural dimensions of sickness and healing cross-culturally, we will explore how anthropologists have approached historical and contemporary problems in the global field of medicine. While our course trajectory will lead us to treat Western biomedicine as only one among many systems of meaning and authority, we will also spend some time deconstructing the often unspoken assumptions that govern this field, thereby complicating the notion that the latter is somehow insulated from the reach of culture. We will also focus on issues of power, inequality, and gender and health. Also listed as ANTH 311  andPH 311 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: Civic Engagement (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Diverse Perspectives, Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , GSS 201 , SOC-101, SOC 316   OR PH 101 .
  
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    GSS 316 - Gender & Sexuality


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to the theories and methods used by sociologists to study gender and sexuality as social performances and historical constructions. Topics include masculinities, intersectionality, sexual culture, pornography, and gender inequality in the workplace. Also listed as SOC 316 .
    Offered: Course offered biennially.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): SOC 110 , SOC 120 , SOC 130 , or SOC 150  Must be 18 years of age.
  
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    GSS 321 - Women’s Writing in Francophone World


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of women’s writing in the Francophone world throughout the 20th Century. Special focus on the novel and the development of alternate prose forms. Authors from France, Switzerland, Belgium, Quebec, the French Caribbean, Senegal, and Algeria may be included. Taught in French. Also listed as FREN 320 .
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): FREN 202  or placement.
  
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    GSS 341 - Service for Gender Equity


    2 credit(s)
    This course entails designing, organizing, and carrying out service projects and programming for The Center for Gender Equity (CGE). Students will be expected to place their work within an analytical context informed by service learning and “civic engagement” theory. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated once for credit.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    GSS 342 - Studies in Fiction


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the development of the short story and novel, with an emphasis on exploring interpretive models. Also listed as ENGL 342  when content allows.
    Offered: Offered every year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    GSS 343 - Food, Fat, and Fitness


    4 credit(s)
    The United States is a culture obsessed with food, fat, and fitness. As efforts to reduce obesity increase, rates of obesity actually increase. Why is that? This anthropology course depends heavily on interdisciplinary perspectives to explore the connections between body size and culture, examining food, fat, and fitness not just as public health issues but as culturally and historically constructed categories related to gender, race, sexuality, and class. While we will explore biocultural approaches to obesity, this course is not a biomedical study of the “obesity epidemic.” Instead we examine the discourses and vocabulary used to describe this current “crisis.” Also listed as ANTH 343  and PH 343 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): ANTH 101 , GSS 201 , SOC 101, SOC 316 , or PH 101 .
  
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    GSS 344 - Studies in Criticism & Theory


    4 credit(s)
    Ranging from Structuralism and Deconstruction to Psychoanalysis, Gender and Sexuality Studies, Post-colonialism, and Film Theory, this course explores some of the most important and influential schools of thought in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries and their impact on literary criticism, literature, art and culture. Class discussions will draw on different critical approaches, such as psychoanalysis, post-humanism, and gender and sexuality theory, to interpret an array of subjects ranging from novels to films to current political affairs and cultural trends. Also listed as ENGL 343  and PHIL 343 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
  
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    GSS 361 - Psychology of Gender


    4 credit(s)
    Psychology of gender will provide students with a survey of psychological theory and research on the influence of gender, gender identity, and gender labels on the cognitive, social, physical states of humans across the lifespan. Course materials will include intersections of gender with other key social identities including race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, ableness, ageism, and sexual orientation.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirement: Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing (60 or more completed credits), PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C, and one of the following: PSY 350 , PSY 348W , SOC 301 , SOC 300W , ANTH 301, SOCWK 310W , or PH 300 .
  
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    GSS 363 - Gender, Sexuality, & Performance


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines gender in and as performance, bringing feminist and queer studies lenses and contemporary theories of gender construction to a variety of performances and texts. Topics will include representations of gender and sexuality within the canon; construction of gender through performances on stage and in everyday life; and the challenging of roles and assumptions through dynamic choices in playwriting, directing, acting, and design. Also listed as THEA 363 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    GSS 365 - Advanced Gender, Sexuality, & Sport


    2 credit(s)
    This course examines the intersection of culturally-based gender ideologies within the systems of sport and physical activity across various competitive levels. Sport continues to be an expression of dominant masculinity and shapes the (hetero)gender binary system. This course will examine and investigate the intersections between gender, race, and sexuality using a variety of theoretical frameworks (e.g., feminism, critical race theory, queer theory) while considering the history of sport and Title IX, relative to women’s emergence into athletics, and the commonalities and differences of men’s and women’s experiences in sport. Course material for this advanced section will extend beyond the introductory level. Students will be required to complete additional assignments to those of GSS 265 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    GSS 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.
  
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    GSS 400 - Medieval Women


    4 credit(s)
    This course is a seminar on the attitude towards, roles, work, and responsibilities of women in the period from the first century to the fifteenth century. Women in their roles as nuns, witches, prostitutes, brewers, mothers, queens, and consorts are discussed. The course is thematic as well as chronological, and investigates anthropological, feminist, and political theories and paradigms associated with the study of women generally. Assigned reading consists of primary sources, secondary monographs, and journals. Also listed as HIST 400 .
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits).
  
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    GSS 421 - Women’s Writing in Francophone World


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of women’s writing in the Francophone world throughout the 20th Century. Special focus on the novel and the development of alternate prose forms. Authors from France, Switzerland, Belgium, Quebec, the French Caribbean, Senegal, and Algeria may be included. Students taking the course at the 400-level must complete more elaborate assignments in French that require more expertise in French. Taught in French. Also listed as FREN 420 .
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): Two 300-level FREN courses or 12 upper-division earned overseas in a French-speaking country.
  
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    GSS 425 - Studies/20th Cent Lit


    4 credit(s)
    Intensive studies in major writers of the period.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), GSS 201 , and two courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    GSS 430 - Major Writers


    4 credit(s)
    A detailed study of the works of selected writers: for example, Chaucer, Milton, Dickens, Blake, Yeats, Thoreau, Woolf. Also listed as ENGL 430  when content allows. May be repeated for credit when content varies.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits), GSS 201 , and 2 courses (minimum 2 each) from 200-level ENGL or above.
  
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    GSS 453 - Creative Work or Research in GSS


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow students an opportunity to conduct creative work or research in the area of Gender and Sexuality Studies; including individual research studies, creative projects or participation in organizing and/or conducting the annual GSS interdisciplinary conference. The project will be developed in consultation with the chair of GSS. May be repeated for credit.
    Offered: Offered Fall and Spring.

    Prerequisite(s): GSS 201  and two GSS electives.
  
  
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    GSS 456 - Gender & Sexuality Studies Mentoring


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to allow advanced GSS minors to guide students new to GSS. Students enrolled in this course will mentor students enrolled in GSS 201 . The specific duties and assignments will be developed in consultation with the professor of GSS 201 . May be repeated for credit.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed), GSS 201 , and 2 additional courses from GSS.
  
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    GSS 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    GSS 495 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent Study contract required.

German

  
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    GER 101 - Intro to German Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    The beginning course is intended to give training in the basic patterns and structures of German. Conversation and reading related to the cultures of German-speaking areas.
  
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    GER 102 - Intro to German Language & Culture


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of GER 101 . The beginning course is intended to give training in the basic patterns and structures of German. Conversation and reading related to the cultures of German-speaking areas.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 101  or placement.
  
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    GER 195 - Independent Study


    1-6 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    GER 201 - Intermediate German


    4 credit(s)
    Designed to prepare students to identify conversational vocabulary. Expansion of conversational, reading, and comprehension skills. Review and development of grammatical constructions most commonly used in speaking. Use of periodical and literary sources and audio-visual materials.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 102  or placement.
  
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    GER 202 - Intermediate German


    4 credit(s)
    Continuation of GER 201 . Designed to prepare students to identify conversational vocabulary. Expansion of conversational, reading, and comprehension skills. Review and development of grammatical constructions most commonly used in speaking. Use of periodical and literary sources and audio-visual materials.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 201  or placement.
  
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    GER 215 - Conversation Laboratory


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to complement 200-level and upper-division German language courses and provide additional opportunity for improving speaking and writing skills, although students who have completed at least 102 in German are eligible to enroll. Students will participate in weekly discussions and oral activities and produce presentations and written work in German. Course taught entirely in German. May be repeated once for credit. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Offered spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 102  or placement.
  
  
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    GER 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    GER 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    GER 301W - Topics in German Culture


    4 credit(s)
    Extensive practice in composition and conversation. Reading and discussion of materials from German media, music, and literature and audio-visual materials develop the students’ comprehension of the German language, society and culture.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 302 - Contemporary Short Stories & Narrations


    4 credit(s)
    Study of significant short stories by major writers in the German-speaking world of the 20th- and 21st centuries. Students present on stories or authors not covered in the classroom.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 303 - German Literature & Culture:1750-Present


    4 credit(s)
    Study of significant developments in literature and culture with focus on the Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Expressionism, the Nazi period, and the post-WWII period, including the 1990 unification. Taught in German.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 304 - German Drama


    4 credit(s)
    Analysis of representative theater pieces by writers in the German-speaking world from the eighteenth century to the present, including Louise Gottsched, Lessing, Schiller, Goethe, Schnitzler, Brecht, Durrenmatt, Frisch Jelinek, and others. Students will improve language skills through analyzing texts closely, viewing performances on film, performing short scenes in class, writing critiques of the plays, and adapting a play for performance. Taught in German.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 305 - Music, Modernism, & Megalomania


    2 credit(s)
    Study of significant developments in culture in the German-speaking countries from 1750-1950. Focus is on Enlightenment, Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Expressionism, the Nazi period, and the immediate post-WWII period. Taught in German.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 306 - From Ruins to Reunification


    2 credit(s)
    Analysis of significant developments in cultures in the German-speaking countries from 1950 to the present with a focus on the existence of two German states and on reunification. Students will improve language skills through analyzing texts closely, viewing media, performing short reenactments of cultural events, and completing a final project. Taught in German.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Humanities (2010-17 catalogs); International Perspectives, Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
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    GER 315W - Advanced Grammar & Composition


    4 credit(s)
    Extensive review of advanced grammatical concepts and practice of written idiom through reading, viewing, discussing, and writing. Use of written and multi-media texts provide context for grammatical structures. Development of vocabulary in conjunction with grammatical constructions occurs through analysis of students’ written and oral work and correction of errors.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Prerequisite(s): GER 202  or placement.
  
  
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    GER 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    GER 400W - German Film


    4 credit(s)
    Analysis of significant 20th and 21st-century German films with concentration on films from contemporary times. Study of theoretical and literary texts in relation to the cultural and political climate. Taught in German. Instructor’s consent required.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
  
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    GER 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    GER 485 - Seminar in German Studies


    4 credit(s)
    An in-depth study of various cultural issues as reflected in the literature, art, history, and politics of German-speaking countries. Topics include: survey of German literature in historical context; German unification; gender and society; politics and culture; Austrian literature and culture; bestselling novels; topics in the contemporary media. Taught in German. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit when content varies.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Humanities (2010 catalog).
  
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    GER 494 - Senior Thesis in German Studies I


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to assist senior students who are completing a capstone and writing a thesis for a major in German Studies. Students will receive direction in completing their research proposal, undertaking their capstone project, writing the thesis in German, and presenting publicly on their research. These are student-conducted individual research projects. Students take GER 494 and GER 495  in consecutive semesters. Taught in German.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed credits) and study abroad.
  
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    GER 495 - Senior Thesis in German Studies II


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed to assist senior students who are completing a capstone and writing a thesis for a major in German Studies. Students will receive direction in completing their research proposal, undertaking their capstone project, writing the thesis in German, and presenting publicly on their research. These are student-conducted individual research projects. Students take GER 494  and GER 495 in consecutive semesters. Taught in German.
    Prerequisite(s): GER 494 .

Gerontology

  
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    GERO 502 - Interdisciplinary Perspectives in Gero


    2 credit(s)
    This foundational seminar course focuses on the interdisciplinary study of aging and the older adult, and implicaitons of population aging in contemporary society.  Best practice in the health professions is emphasized.
  
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    GERO 535 - Health Lit & Comm with Older Adults


    2 credit(s)
    This advanced survey course provides an in-depth exploration of research, theory, and practice in health communication with older adults.  Particular attention is on patient-provider interaction, as related to communication on the delivery of care and services, health promotion, and health literacy.
  
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    GERO 550 - Aging Brain & Body


    3 credit(s)
    Presents current research on neuroscience and physiology of aging; explores factors that influence health and have implications for preventive measures in disease and health disorders in aging; examines the nature of health problems and methods of assessing physical, cognitive, and psychological needs; explores aging effects on clients and caregivers; and presents theories of aging.
  
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    GERO 575 - Dementia & Memory


    3 credit(s)
    Focuses on all aspects of the disease process, including medical management and caring for people
    with dementing illnesses in acute, community, and long-term care settings. Topics include the disease process; effects on cognition, vision, balance, and motor planning; effects on performance of activities of daily living; caregiver stress; strategies for managing and evaluating care provided by family caregivers and healthcare professionals; analysis of clinical care of the dying; and the psychological issues of death and dying.
  
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    GERO 625 - Health Disparities in Aging


    1-3 credit(s)
    Advanced seminar course focuses on aging and health disparity as it relates to homeless, medically indigent, migrant, and disabled populations. Course topics increase awareness of the problems faced by these groups and the societal factors that create disparity. Students identify solutions to help reduce and eliminate health disparities, expand minority health and health disparity research education, and provide information to these groups about intervention, prevention, and management of disease. Information from this course may be used to develop a capstone project.
  
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    GERO 650 - Capstone: Creating Change


    1-3 credit(s)
    Gives students the opportunity to develop, lead, and manage programs through a capstone project.
    The course is designed to develop the student’s knowledge, skills, and abilities to visualize, propose, create, and implement innovative healthcare initiatives. Self-directed learning is required of students in order to practice and enhance critical thinking skills and the student’s ability to integrate the philosophical tenets and conceptual models of their profession. Students identify a problem and design a program or business plan to address it. Each completed project will be presented to the employer or appropriate audience to begin the process of change.
  
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    GERO 680 - Independent Study


    1-9 credit(s)
    Students work with program faculty independently to determine the focus of specific course context to expand understanding of a content area of interest to the student’s individual professional growth in the field of gerontology. Prior approval by the program director is required.

Healthcare Science

  
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    HCSCI 710 - Org Strategies for Interprofessional HC Leadership


    3 credit(s)
    Concepts of leadership related to current healthcare organizations are examined. Specific concepts including effective interprofessional communication, public relations and marketing, team building, the art of negotiation, and conflict resolution are explored. Students will consider the strategic aspects of leadership, while determining their own leadership style. Strategies for managing uncertainty within healthcare systems will be analyzed. Contemporary leadership challenges, communication strategies and critical incident stress debriefing are explored. Leadership structures and decision-making processes will be compared and contrasted against current best practices. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 715 - The Professional as Researcher & Writer


    3 credit(s)
    Introduces the language of research and the art of professional writing for peer-review publication. Students will practice scholarly writing skills and demonstrate a thorough understanding and interpretation of scholarly works. The course will stress the importance of academic writing practice for dissemination and publication. Students will be mentored through the project development and proposal process as they learn to apply, translate, and disseminate research into their professional practices. Students will develop a proposal that is a comprehensive and in-depth case study revolving around a clinical or administrative question that they wish to investigate. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 720 - Clinical Practicum I


    3 credit(s)
    First in a three-course series. Provides the student the opportunity to design and propose a project to integrate the semester’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) emphasis: Social Determinants of Health. The student and their advisor will consider the DEI emphasis as they construct the project to allow the student to obtain additional exposure to aspects of clinical practice management not typically included in their work scope or responsibility level. Students are expected to complete their project by the semester’s end and present their findings to their peers. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 725 - Leadership Ethics & Advocacy


    3 credit(s)
    Offers students fresh insights into the roles, challenges, and decision-making of healthcare leaders, focusing on leadership styles in communities, and exploring relationships between different approaches to leadership in contemporary contexts. Leadership processes, self-awareness and skills necessary to lead, ethical considerations, and managing strategic change are emphasized. Students will learn to grapple with ethical issues regarding program administration, financial constraints, globalization, and advances in technology. Students also will practice with the tools, models, and processes regarding advocacy for social change, and understand how public policy can impact social movements. Personal development of each student’s own advocacy skills is emphasized. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 730 - Clinical Practicum II


    3 credit(s)
    Second in a three-course series. Builds upon Clinical Practicum I and provides the student the opportunity to design and propose a project to integrate the semester’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) emphasis: Advocacy. The student will consider the DEI emphasis as they construct another project or build upon the previous one, to allow the student to obtain additional exposure to aspects of clinical practice management not typically included in their work scope or responsibility level. Students are expected to complete their project by the semester’s end and present their findings to their peers. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 735 - Diversity Equity & System Thinking


    3 credit(s)
    Prepares students to address the diversity of problems and issues they will confront as scholar practitioners and healthcare administrators in an increasingly complex and dynamic world. Students will design flexible structures and use transformational leadership strategies to promote their success in dynamic environments. Strategic planning will be highlighted as a means of establishing both short-term and long-term goals across systems. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 740 - Clinical Practicum III


    3 credit(s)
    Third in a three-course series. Builds upon Clinical Practicum I and II. Provides the student the opportunity to design a project to integrate the semester’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI) emphasis: Population Health. The student will consider the DEI emphasis as they construct another project (or build upon a previous one) to allow the student to obtain additional exposure to aspects of clinical practice management not typically included in their work scope or responsibility level. At the end of this three-course series, students must submit a comprehensive report of their DEI projects including insights on project execution and lessons learned. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 745 - Quality Improvement in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    Students will become familiar with the components of The Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) curriculum to prepare them to lead the development and sustainability of quality management programs. Students will develop skills in evaluating the quality of healthcare data (collection and analysis) while applying industry-standard metrics to determine clinical quality and patient safety outcomes. Students will consider how and when to implement RCQI and PDSA cycles, while ascertaining root-cause for systematic improvement. Students will consider the legal aspects of quality assurance and quality improvement practices, while considering the importance of advocacy for change within diverse healthcare settings. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 755 - Evidence-Based Prac Lifestyle Medicine


    3 credit(s)
    Students will explore the principles and practices of evidence-based lifestyle modification, focusing on the integration of Lifestyle Medicine into daily clinical practice for prevention and treatment of disease. Learners will explore the use of evidence-based lifestyle and wellness therapeutic approaches, such as diverse dietary modifications, prescribed daily exercise, sleep hygiene, tobacco cessation and alcohol moderation, stress management, emotional resilience, and other alternative modalities. Students will debate the best practices for implementing Lifestyle Medicine into their daily practice. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 810 - Applied Scholarly Project I


    3 credit(s)
    First in a three-course series. Guides the student through the process of developing and conducting an applied scholarship project. The applied scholarship project will be designed to target a problem in either clinical or administrative practice. Faculty advisors will mentor students as they progress from project proposal to completion of their scholarly project. Students will conduct a literature review and data collection around their chosen topic. This course will focus on strategies for data collection and analysis, and include preparation and submission of the research protocol to the Institutional Review Board (IRB) for approval. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 820 - Applied Scholarly Project II


    3 credit(s)
    Second in a three-course series. Guides the student through the process of developing and applied scholarly project will be designed to target a problem in either clinical or administrative practice. Faculty advisors will mentor students as they progress through the process. Each phase of the applied scholarly product will be reviewed and graded by the assigned faculty advisor. This course will focus on completion of data collection and data analysis.  Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 830 - Applied Scholarly Project III


    3 credit(s)
    Third in a three-course series. Guides the student through the process of developing and conducting an applied scholarly project. The applied scholarly project will be designed to target a problem in either clinical or administrative practice. Faculty advisors will mentor students as they progress through the process and this course will focus on the completion and submission of a high-quality scholarly work, to be published in a peer-reviewed outlet and/or presentation at a state or national meeting. This course culminates in a scholarly project, suitable for publication or presentation in a peer-reviewed environment.  Pass/No Pass
  
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    HCSCI 850 - Application for the Scholar Practitioner


    6 credit(s)
    Students will utilize their learning across courses in the semester to develop a scholarly paper that addresses the practical application of their previous research into practice.  Considerations will be made for using the lenses of diversity, equity, and inclusion to effectively and responsibly plan implementation of the research completed in prior semesters into the workplace.  This course will also focus on the
    application of evidence-based decision-making to address problems in healthcare practice and administration.  Students will reflect on the role of healthcare leaders as change agents for social justice. Pass/No Pass. 6 credits. Pass/No Pass
  
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    HSC 301 - Healthcare Applied Spanish I


    2 credit(s)
    This is the first of a two-part accelerated course to help students develop the skills needed to understand and communicate in Spanish at a beginning level within the healthcare setting. Language used specifically by healthcare managers and administrators will be a focus. The course also will help students gain valuable understanding of basic cultural issues related to Hispanic patients. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Offered in Fall.

  
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    HSC 302 - Healthcare Applied Spanish II


    2 credit(s)
    This is the second of a two-part accelerated course to help students develop the skills needed to understand and communicate in Spanish at a beginning level within the healthcare setting. Language used specifically by healthcare managers and administrators will be a focus. The course also will help students gain valuable understanding of basic cultural issues related to Hispanic patients. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Offered in Spring.

  
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    HSC 401 - Leadership & Ethics in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    Provides the foundation to develop leadership skills in healthcare management. This involves a process of building self-awareness and self-confidence, and engaging in self-assessment activities and self-reflection. As students learn to trust their own ability to make constructive choices, effectively analyze current situations, and postively influence their environment, they become prepared to undertake leadership roles. Students will learn through theory, practice, and reflection the ethics and values of leadership as well as the various forms of leadership. This process includes self-reflection, evaluating individual strengths and weaknesses, and creating an individualized leadership development plan for professional development and career advancement.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 405 - Comparative Healthcare Delivery Systems


    3 credit(s)
    This course describes variations in healthcare delivery systems locally, nationally, and globally as they relate to policy, structure, and finance. Comparisons of systems are made relative to expenditure of resources and outcomes. Students learn about healthcare coverage, access to care, healthcare rationing, provider manpower distribution, and seeking healthcare in foreign countries (medical tourism). The discrepancy between the desirable and the practical is explored, and students are asked to outline and defend a system that they believe is both desirable and practical, based on evidence from the literature.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 410 - Org Behavior & Human Resource Management


    3 credit(s)
    This course is an overview of organizational theory and the impact of decision-making on the behavior of people within healthcare organizations. Topics will include change management, leadership, motivation, group behavior, conflict management, decision-making, power, organizational structure, business ethics, team building, and communication within organizations. Students will examine the role of the human resources management functions in the maintenance of a productive workforce within the organization. Students also will engage in case study analysis, discussion and role playing as an application of learning.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 415 - Healthcare Strategic Plan & Marketing


    3 credit(s)
    This course analyzes how strategic planning is implemented in a healthcare organization, including the challenges, necessity, and processes of strategic planning. In an organization, all stakeholders must be considered in any implementation of a plan; students will work on projects to learn how to develop and implement strategic plans and the application of effective marketing modalities. Students also will explore market research, product strategy, branding, pricing, placement, promotion, and competition, and learn to appreciate the relationship between service design and delivery, marketing, strategic planning, and budgeting.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 420 - Environ Health & Managerial Epidemiology


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an understanding of how environmental factors contribute to adverse health effects in various populations. Students learn to understand disease patterns associated with environmental contaminants and the impact these have on population health and the cost of delivering healthcare services. The course introduces core epidemiological principles and the essential application of these in planning, evaluating, and managing healthcare services and public health. The course also emphasizes a wide variety of local, regional, and global health issues related to environmental degradation and affecting public health.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 425 - Healthcare Finance & Accounting I


    3 credit(s)
    This course offers an overview of healthcare financial management to build competencies in business and analytical principles, and learn how to keep healthcare organizations financially viable. Basic financial accounting concepts will provide an organization-level understanding of the language, concepts, processes, and key functions of financial management. Managerial accounting principles also will be a focus of the course and include cost accounting, budgeting at the department level, and an understanding of the key role that budget development, budget management, and fiscal control play in ensuring the financial strength of healthcare organizations.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 430 - Healthcare Accounting II


    3 credit(s)
    This course offers an introduction and overview of selected accounting issues and will provide students with an understanding of the basics of financial and managerial accounting principles and their application to healthcare organizations. The course will build basic knowledge of cost accounting, including full and differential costing techniques, and will focus on management control structures and processes, also addressing topics such as budgeting, reporting, and variance analysis. Particular attention will be given to healthcare accounting practices.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 425 .
  
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    HSC 435 - Statistical Analyses & Decision-Making


    3 credit(s)
    All segments of healthcare rely on data provided by government, insurance companies, consultants, research firms, academic institutions, and their own internal databases to make accurate decisions regarding the delivery of healthcare services. All health professionals rely on good data to help guide their decisions. In this course, students will learn to understand the assumptions behind the formulas generating the numbers, and question the validity of apparently inaccurate, misleading or dangerous statistics. This course explains the fundamental concepts of statistics, as well as common uses and misuses. Through a conceptual understanding, students also will learn how to apply various analytical tools, and critically evaluate and analyze data for accurate and enhanced decision making.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 440 - Health Policy and Law


    3 credit(s)
    This course is an overview of legal issues and policies related to healthcare management and compliance. The course provides students with an understanding of laws applicable to patient care delivery, management of employees, patient safety, health information, and HIPAA. Students also will be immersed in cases and issues to develop an indepth understanding about how policies, locally and nationally, affect the quality of healthcare.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 445 - Healthcare Management & Governance


    3 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of the effective management strategies that are used by healthcare administrators in for-profit and not-for-profit organizations. Students will examine the organizational and board governance structures of the various components of the healthcare delivery system including administrative processes such as planning, decision making, evidence-based practice, productivity processes, and continuous quality improvement.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 450 - Healthcare Oper Mgmt & Quality Improve


    3 credit(s)
    This course will explore the role of the operations manager within the framework of healthcare organizations. Focus will be on best practices for quality improvement and how to measure improvement in organizational systems and patient care. Students will learn about various assessment methods and outcomes measurements to determine quality improvement. Topics to be covered include: quality assurance, project management, facility location and design, health information management systems, LEAN, work design and productivity, forecasting, and simulation. Students will explore the transformative role of implementing quality improvement processes in management practices, and better understand the direct impact on patient outcomes, lower costs, and improved system performance.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 455 - Healthcare Economics


    3 credit(s)
    This course is designed to give students a broad understanding of the economics of healthcare. In this course, students will explore healthcare markets including supply, demand, production, and costs. Students also will develop a thorough understanding of the relevance of economic concepts to make accurate decisions in the healthcare sector. By the end of the course, students will possess knowledge of health system financing and service delivery in the U.S. and demonstrate an indepth understanding of the role of economic factors in the development of public policy regarding public health and healthcare.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 460 - Info Management Systems in Healthcare


    3 credit(s)
    Provides an overview of the historic, current, and emerging trends related to health information technology (HIT). Delivers an overview of data, its use, information governance, laws and regulations related to patient privacy and confidentiality, and a focus on the information system acquisition process. Emphasis on the importance of strategic planning and project management of information technology systems in healthcare organizations. Topics include HIPPA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), privacy and security, informatics standards, and electronic health records. 
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 470 - Thesis/Capstone I: Research Methods


    1 credit(s)
    Initial capstone course builds an understanding of the theories, methods, and models used in health services research and the required knowledge regarding how to apply these to healthcare management issues. The course enables students to apply research methodology to understand an issue and propose an evidence-based intervention as a capstone project.
    Prerequisite(s): Admission to BHS program.
  
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    HSC 471 - Capstone II: Syntheses & Presentation


    1 credit(s)
    Final capstone course is the culminating course for the program, synthesizing the models and methods learning throughout the curriculum. Students are required to present their final capstone projects for peer and faculty evaluation to demonstrate synthesis of learning. The capstone presentation represents a demonstrated application of evidence-based research methods to a significant healthcare management topic. Capstone projects must consist of an applied research topic.
    Prerequisite(s): HSC 470 .
  
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    HSC 475 - Internship


    0-2 credit(s)
    The required internship provides an opportunity for students to demonstrate that they can successfully apply theoretical knowledge and skills learned through the BHS coursework to solve common problems of healthcare organizations. Internships must take place within a healthcare organization under the supervision of an onsite preceptor. The student, preceptor, BHS Program Director, and the HAL internship coordinator must agree on the selection of an appropriate project or projects, which the student must describe in the Student Internship Form and submit for approval prior to starting the internship. A final paper reflecting on the internship and the project(s) is required of the student, as well as routine time logs of completed project work and periodic evaluations. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    HSC 480 - Independent Study


    1-4 credit(s)
    Students complete an independent study project related to healthcare management. Projects are supervised by faculty and the program director.

Health Professions Education

  
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    HPE 190 - Passport in Health Professions Education


    0-1 credit(s)
    An introductory course that provides students with a survey of health care careers, including pathways to prepare to enter these careers. Invited speakers will discuss opportunities and challenges, as well as educational and other requirements for various health care careers. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    HPE 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    HPE 290 - Intro to Clinical Practice


    0-1 credit(s)
    This course is designed for sophomores in the Advantage Program. Course topics include HIPAA, procuring internships, ethical issues in health care, health care as a business, funding professional education, and community service and healthcare. Instructor’s consent required. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): HPE 190 . Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    HPE 390 - Manage Grad School Application Process


    1 credit(s)
    This course is designed for juniors in the Advantage Program. Course topics include personal statements and essays for graduate school applications, test-taking strategies for standardized exams, graduate school time management and interviewing for graduate school. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): HPE 290  and cumulative GPA of 3.2 or better. Instructor’s consent required.
  
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    HPE 475 - Internship


    1-14 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.

History

  
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    HIST 103 - Western Civilization II


    4 credit(s)
    This course covers the development of western culture and institutions from the late Middle Ages to the Enlightenment.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    HIST 104 - Western Civilization III


    4 credit(s)
    This course covers the development of western culture and institutions in Europe from the Enlightenment to the Contemporary Era.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    HIST 115 - East Asian Civilization


    4 credit(s)
    A historical survey of three Asian countries: China, Japan, and Korea. We will begin with an introduction to the historical, cultural, and philosophical foundations of East Asia. Then we will examine how East Asia became modern, focusing on socio-economic transformations and geopolitical challenges from the 16th century to the dawn of the 21st century. Major themes include Confucianism, Buddhism, and Daoism; Imperial China and Korea; Tokugawa Japan; Pan-Asianism; Imperialism; and post-World War Two reconstruction and reforms.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspective and Historical Context.
  
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    HIST 141 - American History I


    4 credit(s)
    The first of a two-part survey of American history from European settlement to the Civil War, and from Reconstruction to the present. The parts may be taken separately.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    HIST 142 - American History II


    4 credit(s)
    The second of a two-part survey of American history from Reconstruction to the present. The parts may be taken separately.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
  
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    HIST 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    HIST 203 - History in the Pacific World


    4 credit(s)
    Reading seminar that examines transnational connections among Asia, Hawaii, and the United States. Major topics and themes include colonialism and resistance, global migration and diasporas, race relations, World War II, the Cold War, and globalization. Previously Listed As: HIST 415
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and International Persepctives.
  
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    HIST 211 - Japan Past & Present With Film


    4 credit(s)
    This class surveys Japanese history and culture using classical Japanese films as a primary text, supplemented with assigned readings. The goals of the class are to acquaint students with an overview of Japanese history and culture, and to learn to read films, particularly Japanese classical films, as text.
    Core Requirement(s): Comparative Cultural, International Perspectives, Historical Context
  
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    HIST 216 - History of Modern Japan


    4 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the history of modern Japan, from the Meiji Restoration of 1868 to the present. Major themes and events include Japan’s development as a nation-state, its colonial empire, the Asia-Pacific War, and its “miraculous” postwar recovery and growth. Although the course ostensibly surveys the history of a single nation and society, the emphasis will be on how this history relates to broader socio-economic and political phenomena throughout the world. Offered alternate years. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
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    HIST 217 - Making of Modern China


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides a survey introduction to the history of modern China from the Qing dynasty in the nineteenth century through China’s tumultuous twentieth century. Major themes include: the Opium War; the 1911 Revolution; China’s exploration of different systems of government like republicanism, militarism, nationalism, and socialism; intraregional cooperation and conflict; the battle between the Nationalists and the Communists; and urban-rural social divides. The latter part of the course will focus on the post-1949 era marked by state socialism and events such as the Great Leap Forward, the Cultural Revolution, and Tiananmen Square.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context and International Perspectives.
 

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