Sep 29, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2022-2023 
    
Academic Catalog 2022-2023

School of Pharmacy


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School of Pharmacy Website

The pharmacist is an integral member of an interdisciplinary health care team focused on improving health care outcomes of patients. As the leading source for accurate and timely drug information, the pharmacist contributes to patient safety, alleviation of symptoms, prevention of disease, and reduced health care costs. Pharmacists can choose to work in a wide variety of professional settings. Although the majority of pharmacists work in community pharmacies, many other opportunities exist in health-systems, industry, nursing home, managed care, home infusion, and academic settings.

The School of Pharmacy offers a three-year professional curriculum leading to the Doctor of Pharmacy degree (PharmD), a Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree (MS), and a joint Doctor of Pharmacy/ Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences (PharmD/MS) degree program. Students attend the PharmD program on a year-round basis. The PharmD curriculum is composed of two didactic years followed by one advanced pharmacy practice year. Patient care/pharmacy settings integrate experience that supports the classroom material. The MS program is offered as standalone or as a joint degree with the existing three-year PharmD curriculum. A one-year research-focused curriculum will be added following the three-year PharmD program for a total of four years of education for students in the PharmD/MS joint degree..

The class of 2023 will be the last cohort based on a block design. Students in the class of 2023 and 2022 are not assigned letter grades in the curriculum but are instead assigned either a “pass” or “no-pass” based on achievement of 90% of stated competencies. Students are assessed every two weeks during the first two years of the curriculum. Students who do not achieve the necessary level of competency are given opportunities for extended learning. Extended learning opportunities occur immediately following each semester.

The curriculum places an emphasis on integration of knowledge, critical thinking, and utilization of evidence-based principles.

Program Length

The PharmD program is approximately 34 months divided into three years.

P1: Didactic Year on campus, integrated with sites in the greater Portland area
P2: Rotation at sites including and beyond Portland area during summer; Didactic Year on campus, integrated with sites in the greater Portland area
P3: Clinical Advanced rotations at sites including and beyond the Portland area

The MS program is approximately 24 months divided over five or six terms (fall, spring, summer).

The PharmD/MS program is approximately 46 months divided into four years, with the additional year dedicated to a research-focused curriculum.

Mission

We foster a learner-centered community that prepares leaders, scholars, and providers to elevate the pharmacy profession and interprofessional patient-focused care.

Values

  • Innovation & Leadership
  • Collaboration & Collegiality
  • Integrity & Compassion
  • Diversity & Inclusion
  • Excellence & Advancement

Vision

Develop caring, influential, innovative pharmacists who lead the advancement of public wellness, interprofessional collaboration, and research.

Accreditation

The School of Pharmacy is fully accredited by Accreditation Council of Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Board of Directors. Information on the accreditation process may be found on the Council’s website at www.acpe-accredit.org. The ACPE Board of Directors reviewed the Doctor of Pharmacy program for purposes of continued accreditation at its January 2015 meeting. The accreditation term granted for the Doctor of Pharmacy program extended until June 30, 2023.

Pacific University received institutional accreditation from the Northwest Association of Schools and of Colleges and Universities (NASC), Commission on Colleges and Universities, in 1929. In 1945 the University requested permission and received approval from NASC to offer the doctoral degree. Pacific University is fully accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities (NWCCU), which until the year 2003 was part of NASC.

Student Learning Outcomes

The School adopted the 2013 CAPE Outcomes (also known as the 2016 ACPE Standards 1-4) as our program’s official curricular outcomes starting with the Contemporary Curriculum (Class of 2024 and moving forward).

1.1. Learner (Learner) - Develop, integrate, and apply knowledge from the foundational sciences (i.e., pharmaceutical, social/behavioral/administrative, and clinical sciences) to evaluate the scientific literature, explain drug action, solve therapeutic problems, and advance population health and patient- centered care.

2.1. Patient-centered care (Caregiver) - Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities).

2.2. Medication use systems management (Manager) - Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize the safety and efficacy of medication use systems.

2.3. Health and wellness (Promoter) - Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness.

2.4. Population-based care (Provider) - Describe how population-based care influences patient- centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices.

3.1. Problem Solving (Problem Solver) – Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution.

3.2. Educator (Educator) – Educate all audiences by determining the most effective and enduring ways to impart information and assess understanding.

3.6. Communication (Communicator) – Effectively communicate verbally and nonverbally when interacting with an individual, group, or organization.

3.3. Patient Advocacy (Advocate) - Assure that patients’ best interests are represented.

3.4. Interprofessional collaboration (Collaborator) – Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs.

3.5. Cultural sensitivity (Includer) - Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care.

4.1. Self-awareness (Self-aware) – Examine and reflect on personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth.

4.2. Leadership (Leader) - Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position.

4.3. Innovation and Entrepreneurship (Innovator) - Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals.

4.4. Professionalism (Professional) - Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society.

 

For the Legacy Curriculum (CO2023), the following outcomes still apply.

1A. Develop and use strategies to apply foundational sciences (pharmaceutical, social and administrative, and clinic) to solve therapeutic problems (1.1Learner)

1B. Critically analyze scientific literature to enhance clinical decision making (1.1 Learner)

1C. Demonstrate knowledge and skills related to the laws governing pharmacy practice (1.1 Learner)

2A. Provide patient-centered care as the medication expert (collect and interpret evidence, prioritize, formulate assessments and recommendations, implement, monitor and adjust plans, and document activities) (CAPE: 2.1 Caregiver)

2B. Manage patient healthcare needs using human, financial, technological, and physical resources to optimize operational safety and efficacy (Modified-CAPE: 2.2 Manager)

2C. Design prevention, intervention, and educational strategies for individuals and communities to manage chronic disease and improve health and wellness (CAPE: 2.3 Promoter)

2D. Describe how population-based care influences patient centered care and influences the development of practice guidelines and evidence-based best practices (CAPE: 2.4 Provider)

2E. Prepare medications utilizing appropriate procedures and accurate calculations (2.1 Caregiver)

3A. Identify problems; explore and prioritize potential strategies; and design, implement, and evaluate a viable solution (CAPE: 3.1 Problem Solver)

3B. Utilize a caring, empathetic, and professional manner to effectively communicate with all health care professionals, patients, families and caregivers and assess their understanding (3.2 Educator / 3.6 Communicator)

3C. Demonstrate and practice skills in leading change and promoting advocacy for the profession, patients and self (3.3 Advocate / 4.2 Leader / 4.3 Innovator)

3D. Actively participate and engage as a healthcare team member by demonstrating mutual respect, understanding, and values to meet patient care needs (CAPE: 3.4 Collaborator)

3E. Demonstrate skills necessary to manage personnel, interpersonal relationships, and workflow within pharmacy practice (3.4 Collaborator)

3F. Recognize social determinants of health to diminish disparities and inequities in access to quality care (CAPE: 3.5 Includer)

4A. Assess personal knowledge, skills, abilities, beliefs, biases, motivation, and emotions that could enhance or limit personal and professional growth (Modified-CAPE: 4.1: Self-Awareness)

4B. Demonstrate responsibility for creating and achieving shared goals, regardless of position (CAPE: 4.2: Leadership)

4C. Engage in innovative activities by using creative thinking to envision better ways of accomplishing professional goals (CAPE: 4.3: Innovation)

4D. Exhibit behaviors and values that are consistent with the trust given to the profession by patients, other healthcare providers, and society (CAPE: 4.4:Professionalism)

4E. Actively seek engagement in the profession through service (4.4 Professionalism)

4F. Develop the skills, attitudes, and values necessary for self-directed, life- long learning (4.4 Professional)
CAPE: Center for Advancement of Pharmacy Education

Clinical Educational Facilities

The School has affiliations with a variety of clinical training sites, including but not limited to health-systems (e.g. hospitals), managed care pharmacy organizations, community pharmacies (e.g. chain and independent), ambulatory clinics, long term care facilities, home infusion/specialty pharmacies, mail order pharmacies, and the pharmaceutical industry. The vast majority of these facilities are located within the states of Oregon and Washington. Clinical sites are continually added by the School in order to provide variety and quality to the clinical experiences. Students will complete all rotations at sites assigned by the School and where the School has a current, active affiliation agreement.

Policies: School of Pharmacy

See the School of Pharmacy’s Student Handbook for all program policies.

Licensing Requirements

Students must apply for and received pharmacy intern licenses in both Washington and Oregon once accepted into the School. Students are encouraged to access the Oregon Board of Pharmacy at http://www.oregon.gov/Pharmacy and the Washington Board of Pharmacy at https://www.doh.wa.gov/LicensesPermitsandCertificates/ProfessionsNewReneworUpdate/PharmacyProfessions.

All students must maintain an active Oregon intern license and Washington Intern Registration while enrolled at the School. A copy of this document must be provided to the Office of Experiential Education, who is responsible for tracking student adherence with this policy. Revocation, expiration, or lack of said license precludes students’ ability to participate in experiential activities.

Prior to the third year, students may be required to submit proof of Intern licensure to the Office of  Experiential Education prior to beginning any rotation.

Time limits on program completion

A student may take up to five (5) years to complete the three year Doctor of Pharmacy (PharmD) program at Pacific University. A student may take up to three (3) years to complete the Master of Science in Pharmaceutical Sciences degree (MS). For the joint PharmD/MS, all requirements must be completed within six (6) years of matriculation. All forms of leave (voluntary withdrawals, administrative withdrawals, or leaves of absence) may be extended to a maximum of 24 months total (either consecutive months or cumulative time) with approval from the AD for Student Affairs (ADSA) and/or the AD for Educational Outcomes (ADEO). A student will be dismissed from the program five (5) years for the PharmD program, four (4) years for the standalone MS, or six (6) years for the PharmD/MS program from his/her start date if he/she has not completed program requirements, unless the Dean approves an alternative plan based on student-specific situations. The student may choose to re-apply for admission to the School as a first-year student.

Transfer Credits

Pacific University School of Pharmacy will consider transfer students for admittance to advance standing only after careful review of all available information. The School will evaluate students who wish to transfer on a case by case basis, and will include a student interview. Student prerequisites, course descriptions and syllabi from the previous institution, hours completed, transcripts, and other significant data will be used in making a decision.

Normal Load

9 credits or higher is a full-time course load; 5 credits is half-time.

Auditing

Auditors enroll in and attend classes, but are not required to complete assignments or take examinations. No credit is received for audited courses. Students must declare the audit option before the end of the add-drop period; once the audit option has been declared, the course cannot revert back to the graded option. See the catalog section on Business Policies on Tuition and Fees for payment information.

Grading

The School uses a combination of A-F grades and Pass/No Pass system of recording student achievement. Letter Grades will be assigned using the following scale. Grades will be calculated by the following point allocation with no rounding.

A = 93 & above

A- = 90 to <93

B+ = 87 to <90

B = 83 to <87

B- = 80 to <83

C+ = 75 to < 80

F = below 75 or academic dishonesty, unprofessional conduct, unsatisfactory clinical progress, unsafe clinical practice

P = Pass

N = No Pass

Students must complete all coursework with satisfactory grades.  If the student earns a single grade of “F” or “N” in any required/core course in any given semester, the student will be required to retake the course one more time or will be dismissed from the program.

Academic Standing

Good academic standing in the School of Pharmacy is defined as:

  • satisfactory academic performance
  • sound practice skills
  • adherence to University and School rules and procedures
  • behavior that leads to professional competence and positive interpersonal and professional relations

See the Student Hanbook for details regarding unsatisfactory standing, dismissals, and appeals.

Calendar: School of Pharmacy

http://www.pacificu.edu/pharmd/index.cfm

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