Jan 20, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Academic Catalog 2019-2020

Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice, Law and Society


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Sociology

Faculty

The Sociology major and minor are offered through the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice, Law and Society. Also offered through this department are majors in Anthropology and Criminal Justice, Law and Society. Minors are available in Sociology, Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Law and Society and Comparative Religion.

The major in sociology provides extensive knowledge about culture, social institutions, and everyday interaction as these shape identity, behavior, social systems, and social inequality. Sociology majors are trained in qualitative and quantitative research skills along with tools for advanced critical thinking and theoretical application. The program contributes to a liberal arts education, prepares students for graduate training in sociology, civic and community engagement, and prepares students for careers in law, social services and related fields.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who complete a major in sociology can:

  1. exercise the sociological imagination - observing the relationship between individuals and historical, cultural, and social forces
  2. perceive how one’s particular life experiences are shaped by social economic status, age, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, religion and subculture
  3. demonstrate a basic knowledge of the mechanisms that underpin social inequality
  4. demonstrate a basic understanding of the important theoretical models of the discipline
  5. demonstrate a basic understanding of quantitative and qualitative methods
  6. demonstrate a basic understanding of the academic sociological literature as it relates to contemporary social issues
  7. apply sociological understandings to public debates and community programs
  8. understand social processes that contribute to social change
  9. articulate sociological ideas to a lay audience
  10. demonstrate an ability to gather and analyze data
  11. demonstrate an introductory understanding of how to present original research for an academic audience in oral and written form.
  12. demonstrate an ability to design and propose original research in sociology.

Anthropology

Faculty

The Anthropology major and minor are offered through the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice, Law and Society, which also offers a major in Sociology and Criminal Justice, Law and Society. Minors are available in Sociology, Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Law and Society and Comparative Religion.

Anthropology explores the diversity of humankind by asking what it means to be human. Anthropologists examine this diversity through the common thread of culture building on the premise that all cultural beliefs, values, and practices can be understood when examined in their own cultural context. By examining human behaviors comparatively, anthropologists learn to avoid ethnocentrism, the tendency to interpret practices as strange on the basis of preconceptions derived from one’s own cultural background. Anthropologists learn how to make the strange familiar and the familiar strange and thereby provide frameworks for cross-cultural understanding at the micro and macro level.

Anthropology majors are trained in qualitative and ethnographic research skills along with tools for advanced critical thinking and theoretical application. The program contributes to a liberal arts education, prepares students for graduate training in anthropology, civic and community engagement, as well as careers in healthcare, government, business, law, journalism, social services, education, and human rights work—in local and international settings.

The anthropology curriculum provides graduates with knowledge and perspectives needed to participate as engaged citizens in a global society. Anthropology emphasizes tolerance and respect for other cultures’ ways of living. Anthropological approaches oriented toward social and political engagement, collaborations with local communities, applied work, and public dissemination of research (through publishing, oral presentations, film, internet and museum exhibits, web-content) provide specific tools and opportunities for inspiring students to think, care, create, and pursue justice in our world.

Students interested in an Anthropology major should consult with a faculty member in the Anthropology Department before the end of the sophomore year. It is highly recommended that students study abroad, participate in a travel course, or engage in local immersion in the United States.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students who complete a major in anthropology will be able to:

  1. exercise anthropological thinking - observing the relationship between individuals and historical, cultural, and social forces
  2. appreciate the diversity of human cultures and the interconnectedness of people around the world
  3. understand the major questions, concepts, ethical issues and methodologies of anthropology as a professional discipline
  4. reflectively perceive how one’s particular life experiences are shaped by social factors, including economic status, age, race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion
  5. demonstrate a basic knowledge of how social inequalities operate at the macro and micro scale
  6. demonstrate a basic understanding of academic anthropological literature as it relates to contemporary social issues
  7. creatively apply anthropological understandings to public debates, social problems, and community programs
  8. demonstrate an ability to gather, organize, and analyze data
  9. use a variety of anthropological methods including interviews, participant observation, field notes
  10. demonstrate an ability to work with peers
  11. employ flexible methods of self-presentation across a variety media, including written, social, visual, and oral

Criminal Justice, Law and Society

Faculty

The major in Criminal Justice, Law and Society (CJLS) is offered by the Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Criminal Justice, Law and Socity. CJLS explores complex issues of crime, justice and social policy from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Students will explore the theory and philosophy of law and justice in the United States and grapple with the challenges of the pursuit of justice in our complicated and quickly changing social environment. Students pursuing the major in Criminal Justice, Law and Society may pursue careers in social policy, criminal justice, law enforcement, juvenile justice, corrections, law, federal and state agencies and organizations. The CJLS major is also excellent preparation for graduate work in law, political science, social work, criminology, public administration, education and other academic disciplines.

Program Learning Outcomes

Students completing the Criminal Justice, Law and Society major will:

  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the various components of the U.S. criminal justice system and its legal context.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of competing theories of crime and criminal justice, in the U.S. and globally.
  • Appreciate the influence of issues of race, gender and economic status in the criminal justice system.
  • Demonstrate basic conflict resolution skills.
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of one setting or one component of crime or criminal justice.
  • Be able to clearly articulate, consider and argue issues requiring diverse frames of reference within criminal justice.
  • Demonstrate writing and presentation skills needed to convey complex issues with clarity and understanding.

Comparative Religion

Faculty

The Department of Sociology, Anthropology, and Social Work offers the following programs: a major in anthropology-sociology; a major in sociology; a major in social work; and minors in sociology, anthropology, and comparative religion. The program in comparative religion offers an interdisciplinary minor, which strives to enhance knowledge of religious traditions and histories and to teach the skills necessary for the analysis of religion. The goal of the minor is to explore religion as an important dimension of personal meaning, culture, social institutions, and social structure.

Program Learning Outcomes

Will demonstrate an understanding of the beliefs, rituals, texts and figures related to a variety of religious traditions.

  • Will demonstrate understanding of the basic teachings and practices of major religious traditions and will be able to compare and contrast principle similarities and differences between them.
  • Will demonstrate understanding of how religion informs and is informed by other dimensions of human experience and knowledge, such as gender, race, politics.
  • Will demonstrate understanding of how religions are used to both support and critique social structures and institutions.
  • Will demonstrate an ability to read, analyze and interpret materials and texts related to the study of the world’s religions.

Programs

    Bachelor of ArtsBachelor of ScienceMinor

    Courses

      AnthropologyComparative ReligionCriminal Justice, Law and SocietyPublic HealthSocial Innovation & Non-Profit LeadershipSociologyPage: 1 | 2

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