Dec 04, 2022  
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 
    
Academic Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Physician Assistant

  
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    PA 633 - Inpatient Medicine Rotation


    6 credit(s)
    Clinical rotation for 6 weeks in an in-patient setting including required readings in medicine practice. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Phase II.

  
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    PA 634 - Surgery Rotation


    6 credit(s)
    Clinical rotation for 6 weeks in a surgical practice with an emphasis on operative experiences. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Phase II.

  
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    PA 636 - Emergency Medicine Rotation


    6 credit(s)
    Clinical rotation for 6 weeks in an emergency department, urgent care or trauma care setting. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Phase II.

  
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    PA 637 - Primary Care I


    6 credit(s)
    Clinical rotation for 6 weeks in the area of primary care, specialties, community medicine, public health, or international/global health. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Phase II.

  
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    PA 639 - Primary Care II


    6 credit(s)
    Clinical rotation for 6 weeks in the areas of primary care, specialities, community medicine, public health, or international/global health. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Phase II.

  
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    PA 656 - Independent Study A


    See department for details. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 658 - Independent Study B


    See department for details. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 665 - Professional Practice Seminar I


    1 credit(s)
    One-week seminar course dealing with professional practice issues, journal club, ethics, diversity. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 666 - Professional Practice Seminar II


    1 credit(s)
    One-week seminar course dealing with professional practice issues, journal club, ethics and diversity. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 667 - Professional Practice Seminar III


    1 credit(s)
    One-week seminar course dealing with professional practice issues, journal club, ethics and diversity. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 668 - Professional Practice Seminar IV


    1 credit(s)
    One-week seminar course dealing with professional practice issues, journal club, ethics and diversity. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PA 696 - Clinical Graduate Project


    6 credit(s)
    Student conducts a clinical project followed by on-site presentation of results to PA faculty and other PA students with a final written paper of publishable quality or poster presentation. Professional practice issues seminars and journal club. Pass/No Pass.
    Offered: Summer Phase II.


Physics

  
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    PHY 110 - Physics of Everyday Phenomena


    4 credit(s)
    Designed to develop an understanding of the phenomena of our everyday life via the laws of physics. The emphasis is not on problem solving but on encouraging students to understand and appreciate their environment from a new perspective. Includes topics in mechanics and other physics subfields such as thermal physics, electrical phenomena.
  
  
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    PHY 160 - Energy & the Environment


    4 credit(s)
    In order to live, humans require energy, and methods of energy production significantly affect the environment in which humans live. This course examines fundamental thermodynamic concepts such as energy and power and then explores the comparative environmental costs and benefits, including potential long term consequences, of producing energy from various sources such as fossil fuels, nuclear reactors, wood burning, solar panels, wind turbines, etc. Methods of estimation and risk assessment are emphasized so that meaningful comparisons between energy sources and their environmental consequences can be made. Also listed as ENV 160 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
  
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    PHY 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    PHY 202 - Introductory Physics I


    4 credit(s)
    The first semester of an algebra-based sequence in physics. Topics include Newtonian mechanics, work, momentum, and energy. The lab component includes computer based experiments in mechanics.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 125  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 202L 
  
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    PHY 202L - Introductory Physics I Laboratory


    Laboratory to accompany Introductory Physics I.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 202 .
  
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    PHY 204 - Introductory Physics II


    4 credit(s)
    The second semester of an algebra-based sequence in physics. Topics include heat and thermodynamics; electricity and magnetism; sound and light waves. The laboratory component includes computer based experiments in heat and thermodynamics; electric circuits.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 202  or PHY 232W  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 204L 
  
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    PHY 204L - Introductory Physics II Lab


    Laboratory to accompany Introductory Physics II.
    Corequisite(s): PHY 204 
  
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    PHY 232W - Gen Physics I-Workshop Phys I


    4 credit(s)
    An introductory course in physics (calculus-based) for science and pre-engineering students. First term includes Newtonian mechanics. This course is an inquiry-based, laboratory-oriented course.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Quantitative Reasoning.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 226 
  
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    PHY 242 - General Physics II-Workshop Physics II


    4 credit(s)
    A continuation of PHY 232W  including electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, and nuclear physics.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Scientific Perspectives of the Natural World.
    Prerequisite(s): MATH 226  or MATH 227  with a minimum grade of C-; and PHY 202  or PHY 232W  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 275 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    PHY 311 - Relativity I


    2 credit(s)
    The first of a two-course introduction to Einstein’s theory of relativity. This course emphasizes special relativity. Topics may include the principle of relativity, space-time effects of the Lorentz transformations, and Minkowski diagrams.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 202  or PHY 232W  with a minimum grade of C-; and MATH 226  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 312 - Relativity II


    2 credit(s)
    The second of a two-course introduction to Einstein’s theory of relativity. This course extends the development of special relativity in PHY 311  and introduces general relativity. Topics may include relativistic energy and momentum, the equivalence principle, the geometry of space-time, and gravity.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 311 with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 313 - Relativity


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to Einstein’s theory of relativity. This course includes special relativity and general relativity. Topics may include the principle of relativity, space-time effects of the Lorentz transformations, Minkowski diagrams, relativistic energy and momentum, the equivalence principle, the geometry of space-time, and gravity.
    Offered: Offered in Winter of even-numbered years

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 202 or PHY 232W and MATH 226 each with a minimum grade of C-
  
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    PHY 322 - Modern Physics With Health Applications


    4 credit(s)
    A project-orientated course taught in a workshop environment that covers important topics in modern physics with applications to human health. Topics include the Bohr theory of the atom, wave/particle duality, atomic and nuclear physics, and an introduction to Schrodinger’s equation. Projects may include nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, neutron activation analysis, and magnetic resonance imaging.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 227  Offered alternate years.
  
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    PHY 325 - Selected Topics in Physics


    2-4 credit(s)
    Study of a particular field in physics selected by the instructor and approved by the Physics Department. May or may not include a lab. Previous topics have included Environmental Physics, Particle Physics, Data Acquisition, Optics, Solid State Physics, and Non-Linear Dynamics. PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-; additional prerequisites may apply depending on the topic. Some topics may require the instructor’s consent. Refer to the online course schedule to verify if instructor consent is required for the offered topic. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 242 
  
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    PHY 332 - Waves and Optics


    4 credit(s)
    A course on the mathematical description of waves with application to optics. Topics will include wave addition, an introduction to Fourier analysis, laws of geometric optics, image formation, optical systems, interference and diffraction, polarization, lasers, and an introduction to transform optics including holography. The laboratory component will include selected experiments in wave motion, geometric optics, and physical optics.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 227 
  
  
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    PHY 364 - Electronics


    4 credit(s)
    The basic principles underlying circuit analysis and the operation of analog and digital electronic devices, including: diodes; transistors; op-amps; logic gates; multivibrators; counters; registers; memories; and A/D and D/A converters.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 125  with a minimum grade of C-; and PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 377 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics I


    2 credit(s)
    The first of a two-course introduction to the principles of static mechanics. Special emphasis is given to problem solving techniques in physics and engineering. Topics may include: force analysis, equilibrium in two dimensions, trusses and frames, internal forces, and centroids.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 232W  or PHY 202 ; and MATH 226  each with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 378 - Engineering Mechanics: Statics II


    2 credit(s)
    The second of a two-course introduction to the principles of static mechanics. Special emphasis is given to problem solving techniques in physics and engineering. Topics may include: equilibrium in three dimensions, distributed forces in cables, centroids of composite bodies, fluid statics, and frictional phenomena.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 377  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 379 - Engineering Statics


    4 credit(s)
    Provides an introduction to the principles of static mechanics. Special emphasis is given to problem solving techniques in physics and engineering. Topics may include: force analysis, equilibrium in two dimensions, trusses and frames, internal forces, and centroids. Offered in Winter during odd-numbered years.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 202  or PHY 232W , and MATH 226 . Each with a minimum grade of C-.  
  
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    PHY 384 - Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics


    4 credit(s)
    Presentation, discussion, and application of the laws of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics including gas behavior, equations of states, phase transformations, kinetic theory, probability distributions, ensembles, and the partition function.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): MATH 227  with a minimum grade of C-; PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-; and one upper division PHY course with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    PHY 410 - Classical Mechanics: Dynamics


    4 credit(s)
    Presentation and discussion of the kinematics and dynamics of single particles and systems of particles, both in inertial and non-inertial frames of reference. In addition to the standard analytical techniques, approximation techniques and a computer algebra system will be used for problem solving. Several mechanical systems will be studied experimentally and computationally.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 204  or PHY 242  with a minimum grade of C-.
    Corequisite(s): MATH 228  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 420 - Quantum Mechanics


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to quantum mechanics and its application to: free particles, barriers, the simple harmonic oscillator, the hydrogen atom, angular momentum, spin, and identical particle systems. A computer algebra system will be utilized for problem solving and visualization.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 322  or PHY 332  with a minimum grade of C-; and MATH 228  or MATH 311  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 460 - Electric & Magnetic Fields


    4 credit(s)
    Development of the nature and mathematical description of electric and magnetic fields in free space and material media, including: Maxwell’s equations, electrostatics, magnetostatics, dielectrics, and solutions of Laplace’s and Poisson’s equations.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHY 322  or PHY 332  with a minimum grade of C-; and MATH 228  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 470 - Advanced Analysis in Physics


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides students with experience in analyzing and describing complex physical systems from current topics in physics. Emphasis is on the synthesis of concepts learned throughout the undergraduate physics curriculum in order to approach advanced problems.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed) and declared Physics major.
  
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    PHY 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    PHY 491 - Physics Capstone I


    2 credit(s)
    The first semester of a year-long research experience. Students will work with individual faculty research advisors. At the end of Physics 491 students will give oral presentations on their research progress and submit a draft research paper.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed) and declared Physics major.
  
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    PHY 493 - Senior Capstone II


    2 credit(s)
    The second semester of a year-long research experience. Students will work with individual faculty research advisors. At the end of Physics 493 students will give final oral presentations on their research and submit a final research paper.
    Prerequisite(s): PHY 491  with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    PHY 495 - Physics Research


    Student-conducted individual research project. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated for credit.

Political Science

  
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    POLS 140 - Introduction to U.S. Politics


    4 credit(s)
    The most enduring questions about politics are the who, the what, the when, and the how of politics. This course seeks to answer these questions as they pertain to the American political system.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 180 - The United States in World Affairs


    4 credit(s)
    A first course in international relations, focused on current problems and concerns in United States foreign policy. These include both “off-shore” issues such as human rights and peace-keeping and “intermestic” issues such as trade and immigration. The course will begin with an overview of American foreign policy traditions and attitudes and of the 20th century background. Counts toward core requirement: International Perspective.
  
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    POLS 195 - Independent Study


    See Department for details. Independent Study contract required.
  
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    POLS 209 - Ideas in Action: Pol Phil & Modern Soc


    4 credit(s)
    Applying the insights of classical and contemporary political philosophers to the ideologies and political controversies of contemporary America. Topics covered may include environmental ethics, economic inequality and justice, the role of the state in the economy, affirmative action and multiculturalism with attention paid to modern ideologies from the far right to the far left. Philosophers may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Rousseau, Marx, and Mill as well as a variety of contemporary political philosophers.
    Offered: Offered every other year.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    POLS 212 - Conservatism & Its Critics


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of historical and contemporary conservative ideas and movements from Edmund Burke to the present with an emphasis on the variety of conceptions of conservatism. Also includes critiques of different forms of conservative thought from within the conservative tradition itself as well as from liberal and socialist critics of conservatism.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    POLS 213 - Socialism & Its Critics


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of historical and contemporary socialist ideas and movements from the Bible and Plato to the contemporary period, including a survey of utopian socialist, Marxist, anarchist, communist, and social democratic variants of the socialist ideal. Also includes critiques of different forms of socialist thought from within the socialist tradition itself as well as from liberal and conservative critics of socialism.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    POLS 221 - Politics in Literature & Film


    2-4 credit(s)
    Exploration of a single major theme of politics through the medium of literature and film. Possible course themes include Latin American film, revolution, war, utopia, propaganda, the Cold War and American political culture. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    POLS 224 - Environmental Politics


    4 credit(s)
    This course introduces students to environmental disputes and the forces that affect environmental policy. Topics include the history and evolution of environmentalism and environmental policy and an extensive case study of a local environmental issue. Also listed as ENV 224 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Sustainability.
  
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    POLS 231 - Contemporary Middle East


    4 credit(s)
    An exploration of the modern Middle East, the course will focus on issues of politics, culture, economics, and conflict. Special emphasis will be on Israel and its neighbors, the role of oil, the nature of Islam, and the special interests of the United States in the region.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
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    POLS 232 - Current Events in the Middle East


    2 credit(s)
    Whatever is in the news about the Middle East, we will cover it in this two-week course taught during Winter term. The central issues of Israel-Palestine and of oil’s role in the region are constants. The course will explore the role of religion, culture, politics, and international interest in the region as well as particular geographic areas (e.g. Syria, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran).
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives.
  
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    POLS 239 - Latin America I: Conquest-Independence


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of Latin American history from 200 C.E. to 1810 C.E. with a focus on the pre-Columbian Mayan, Aztec, and Inca civilizations; the conquest and settlement of Mexico, Central America, and South America by the Spanish and Portuguese; and the colonial institutions in Spanish America and Brazil up to the beginnings of the movements toward independence. Special emphasis will be given to the clash of indigenous and European religious/spiritual outlooks, political economy, and the interaction of issues of race, class, and gender in the emergence of sycretic New World societies. Also listed as HIST 239 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
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    POLS 241 - Latin America II: Independence-Present


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of Latin American history from 1810 to the present with a focus on the independence struggles and the first century of independence; the rise of populism, socialism, and economic nationalism; the collapse of populist democracies and the rise of bureaucratic authoritarian military regimes; and recent transitions to democracy combined with economic liberalization. Course will also include attention to issues of class, race and gender, over the course of these political and economic transformations and the history of US-Latin American relations in the 19th and 20th century.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Historical Context.
  
  
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    POLS 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    POLS 295 - Independent Study


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    POLS 301 - Politics and The Media


    4 credit(s)
    Examines the impact of the media upon the political process; the relationship between the press and politicians; and whether the press is a “neutral” force in American politics. Biennially.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 302 - Parties and Elections


    4 credit(s)
    The development of political parties and their organization, function and campaign methods. Analysis of interest groups and their effect on government and political parties. Public opinion and propaganda. Involvement in a political campaign required.
    Offered: Biennially

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    POLS 304 - Community Politics


    4 credit(s)
    An exploration of how community politics works in the United States. The class will look at issues of representation, participation, public funding, and taxation. Analysis will focus on state and local governments and interest groups. Through participant observation and readings in the field, the class will explore theory and practice in community politics groups.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    POLS 306 - Presidency and Congress


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the relations between the U.S. presidency and Congress, and how these relations have evolved over time. Students will examine long-term trends in this relationship and will consider compelling, instructive anomalies as well. Students will study the formal and informal powers of both Congress and the president and also explore case studies of conflicts between the two branches in the realms of both domestic and foreign policy. They will also carefully follow congressional-presidential relations as they unfold over the course of the semester, closely tracking the news as it emerges from Washington, DC.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 310 - Markets, Politics & Justice


    4 credit(s)
    An examination of political economy (the interaction of politics and economics) with respect to topics such as macroeconomic policy- making, industrial policy, income distribution, development strategies, and the welfare state plus the political dimensions of economic ideologies including classical liberal, Marxist, and social democratic perspectives. ECON 101  or ECON 102  strongly recommended.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 312 - Comparative Politics of Healthcare


    4 credit(s)
    This course surveys, compares, and evaluates the structure of national healthcare and health insurance systems across a variety of developed countries in North America, Europe, and Asia, including the US, Canada, Britain, France, Germany, Japan, and Singapore. In addition, it provides an introduction to the politics of policy development with respect to reform projects in the area of healthcare for selected countries and explores a variety of criteria for evaluating different healthcare and health insurance systems. Also listed as PH 312 .
    Offered: Alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives; Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing (30 or more completed credits).
  
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    POLS 321 - Protest, Dissent, & Social Change


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines the causes and history of widespread movements that use protest to promote political change. Topics include theories of social movements and case studies that may include the labor movement, the civil rights movement, the women’s movement, the environmental movement, and the recent rise of conservative Christian activism. Also listed as PSJ 321.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.
  
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    POLS 322 - The Suppression of Dissent


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores how the state, mass media, and other forces suppress dissent. Students will first gain a theoretical foothold in the field of social-movement studies, along the way exploring the following questions: What is dissident citizenship? How, when, and why does the state suppress dissent? What role do the mass media play in the suppression of activism? Students will also study specific historical instances of political suppression, such as the suppression of the American Indian Movement, civil rights movement, environmental movements, and the Global Justice Movement.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 324 - The Politics of Policing


    4 credit(s)
    Students will examine the history of policing in the United States, from slave patrols to modern-day special weapons and tactics (SWAT) teams. Careful attention will be given to the politics of police surveillance, the increasing militarization of domestic police forces, and the policing of political activism. Students will also engage with numerous contemporary debates around policing, from the use of body and dashboard cameras to efforts to defund police and channel that funding to social services such as homelessness and mental-health support. Also listed as CJLS 324
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed credits)
  
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    POLS 325 - Constitutionalism I


    4 credit(s)
    This course is about the structural protections of liberty in the U.S. Constitution: popular sovereignty, the rule of law, limited government, federalism, and separation of powers. We will focus on the evolution of these principles by key political and legal actors: presidents, members of Congress, as well as the decisions of the Supreme Court. There will be a special focus on the latter. The course will show how the development of our constitution is not only legal-but thoroughly political. There are no official prerequisites for the course, but students should have a basic understanding of how the three branches of the US government operate. Also listed as CJLS 325 
    Offered: Biennially

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    POLS 326 - Constitutionalism II


    4 credit(s)
    This course is about the formal protections of liberty and equality in the U.S. Constitution through the Bill of Rights and the Civil War Amendments. It will focus on freedom of speech and press, freedom of religion, the right to bear arms, criminal rights, the right to privacy, and equal citizenship for all, irrespective of racial, gender, and sexually-based forms of difference. Like POLS 325, this course will examine the writings and speeches of different government actors, but it will include the contributions of important citizens and organizations to America’s quest for liberty and equality. There are no official prerequisites for the course, but students should have a basic understanding of how the three branches of the US government operate. Also listed as CJLS 326 
    Offered: Biennially

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    POLS 330 - National Systems & Global Challenges


    4 credit(s)
    Survey of national political systems in the context of the challenge of globalization. Countries studied and compared will include most or all of the following: United States, Britain, France, Germany, Russia, China, Japan, Mexico, Brazil, India, Nigeria, Egypt, Iran, and the European Union (as emerging or quasi-state). Issues analyzed will include competing theories of the origins and consequences of different political institutions, the relationship between domestic political arrangements and the ability to cope with globalization, transitions to democracy, and the consolidation of democracy and the future of the nation-state.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 331 - Modern Dictatorship


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of non-traditional, 20th century dictatorships and the theoretical concepts and explanations political science has developed to categorize and explain them, including especially controversies surrounding the concepts of “authoritarianism” and “totalitarianism.” Cases examined will include some or all of the following: the USSR, Nazi Germany, the People’s Republic of China, Latin American military dictatorships, and the Iranian quasi-theocracy.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 340 - Security, Rights & Globalization


    4 credit(s)
    Nationalism and cultural identity; the international system and world organization; problems of conflict and war; issues of human rights and democracy; economic globalization and development; and security issues such as the spread of weapons of mass destruction.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts towards core requirements: International Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    POLS 345 - International Political Economy


    4 credit(s)
    This course explores the post-WWII world economy, the place of the United States in that economy, the role of theory and differing world views, and possibilities for future economic realities. Particular emphasis is placed upon understanding U.S., European and Japanese, and post-Communist international economic policy and business decisions. POLS 180  and ECON 101  strongly recommended.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspective.
  
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    POLS 350 - Special Topics in Political Science


    2-4 credit(s)
    Courses of varying formats on specific topics not included in the regular curriculum. Past examples include Contemporary Mexico, the Salmon Crisis, and Oregon Forest Policy. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary.
  
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    POLS 351 - Social Policy & Social Justice


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides an examination of both the historical and contemporary context of social welfare policies and programs. The course will examine how legislation is developed, enacted, and implemented in our society, including how policies have emerged in response to social problems at the local, national, and international levels. Issues of social justice, and how policies and programs affect populations at risk, will be emphasized. U.S. social welfare policy will be examined in a global and human rights context. Also listed as SOCWK 351  and PH 351 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
    Prerequisite(s): SOCWK 201 , PH 101  or POLS 140  , with a minimum grade of C-.
  
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    POLS 352 - Politics and Sports


    4 credit(s)
    In this course, students explore the intersection of politics and sports. Topics include: the political economy of sport; sport and social class; how race and ethnicity affect participation in, reactions to, and media coverage of sports; how gender and sexuality inflect both media portrayals of sport and our understanding of athleticism. Students examine the politics of both professional and amateur sports as well as mega-events like the Olympics and soccer World Cup. The course also involves discussing contemporary connections between politics and sports as they unfold in real time, bringing modern-day events into conversation with the course texts.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    POLS 353 - Politics, Media, and Sports


    4 credit(s)
    Students will examine the emergence, development, and evolution of sports media and how these processes are inflected by-even driven by-politics. To gain a strong understanding of sports communication practices, students analyze sports media output through the lens of politics. Students also connect sports-media politics as they unfold over the semester with concepts from the course texts. Each student designs and carries out a sports-media research project using primary-source data. Counts towards Core Requirement: Social Systems & Human Behavior. 4 credits
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore Standing or above (30 or more completed credits)
  
  
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    POLS 386 - Race & American Political Thought


    4 credit(s)
    The course will have two parts. It will begin with a legal, and political history of race and its centrality to the development of American politics from the framing of the U.S. Constitution to the inauguration of the modern two-party system after the Second Reconstruction. The course will then explore the role of race in contemporary American politics by looking at the writings on contemporary race topics from prominent conservative and liberal thinkers.
    Offered: Offered Triennially

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Historical Context, International & Diverse Perspectives
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed credits)
  
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    POLS 395 - Independent Study


    1-4 credit(s)
    Student-conducted individual research/theoretical project. Faculty supervised. Independent study contract required.
  
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    POLS 399W - Theory & Methodology in POLS


    4 credit(s)
    A required junior seminar for POLS majors that focuses on key concepts, theories, and methodologies in political science to prepare majors for the senior capstone experience. Exercises in course will culminate in a formal proposal for the senior thesis.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Writing in the Discipline.
    Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above (60 or more completed).
  
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    POLS 475 - Internship


    1-14 credit(s)
    Off-campus placements in political settings can be undertaken for. Requirements vary. See Department Chair for more information. Internship contract required.
  
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    POLS 495 - Independent Research


    1-4 credit(s)
    Student-conducted individual research/theoretical project. Faculty supervised. Independent study contract required.
  
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    POLS 498 - Senior Seminar & Thesis I


    4 credit(s)
    In this course, students define their thesis project, gather necessary information, carry out original research, and write their senior thesis. The seminar will also meet four hours a week to discuss selected readings in research methods, theories of power, and approaches to policy analysis. This course is required of all majors in their final year.
    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing (90 or more completed), POLS 399W , and declared Politics & Government major.
  
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    POLS 499 - Senior Seminar & Thesis II


    1 credit(s)
    In this course, students refine their thesis and prepare to present it publicly. In addition to completing their written thesis, students will prepare their public presentation of the thesis for Senior Projects Day. This course is required of all majors in their final year.
    Prerequisite(s): POLS 498 

Psychology, Undergraduate

  
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    PSY 125 - Psychology of Aesthetics


    2 credit(s)
    Aesthetics–the concern for or appreciation of beauty–is rarely considered as an appropriate topic within science; however, the perception of beauty is often one of the best predictors of behavior. This course introduces students to the brain and behavioral science of aesthetic preference. Focus is placed on answering three questions: 1) What do common human preferences tell us about our relationship to other species and our evolutionary past? 2) How does the mind perceive, remember, and organize the conceptual and affective information associated with beauty? 3) Are differences in aesthetic preference mere noise or do they say something meaningful about us as individuals?
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior
  
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    PSY 150 - Introduction to Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    Psychology is the science of human and animal behavior and mental processes. As a survey course, Introduction to Psychology provides an overview of the methods, terms, theories, and research findings in the field. By understanding principles of psychology, students learn more about themselves, other human and non-human animals, historic and contemporary issues within the discipline and how to think about those issues critically.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
  
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    PSY 160 - Cultural Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    The goal of this course is to provide a cross-cultural review of general principles of human psychology. Emphasis is on the organizing syndromes of particular cultures and how these world-views affect an individual’s emotions, cognitions and behaviors.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Diverse Perspectives and Social Systems and Human Behavior.
  
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    PSY 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    PSY 202 - Health Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    This course provides an overview of research, theory, and contemporary issues in the area of health psychology focusing on the ways in which individual factors, interpersonal processes, and larger systems influence the psychological and physical well-being of individuals. Topics include lifestyle factors and theories of health behavior change, stress and coping, help-seeking and healthcare interactions, prevention and intervention strategies, as well as a discussion of pain, injury, and chronic illness.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with minimum grade C.
  
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    PSY 206 - Cognitive Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    Attention to detail, reasoned argumentation, correct responses on tests of your knowledge or skill, remembered experiences and shared reminiscences that easily flow from thought to word. These are all core cognitive capabilities that we use nearly every day of our adult lives and that are of the utmost importance for college students like you. What makes all this possible? In Cognitive Psychology students learn about the forms, functions, and causes of cognition. In this class, the current status of the field, including what’s known about human universals and cultural relativities, is examined through the lens of Psychological Science.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with minimum grade of C.
  
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    PSY 208 - Addictions and Society


    4 credit(s)
    Addictions and Society takes a historical and interdisciplinary approach to the question of alcohol, substance abuse and the social costs of addiction and use. The course investigates human motives to alter consciousness using classic and modern research in the physiology of addiction, sociocultural risk factors and changing cultural representations of drug use.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    PSY 210 - Current Issues in Psychology


    2-4 credit(s)
    This is a seminar-style course that varies from one semester to the next. Course themes are selected based on the contemporary issues in the field and the faculty member’s area of expertise, interest, and background. Examples of “Current Issues” include: Peoples and Cultures of Hawai’i; The Nature of Self-Concept; Aging; Life-Story Models of Identity; Evolutionary Psychology; and Psychology of Mindfulness. May be repeated for credit when topic varies.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C; additional prerequisites may apply depending on topic.
  
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    PSY 211 - Abnormal Psychology


    4 credit(s)
    Students critically explore major categories of disorders, with special emphasis on anxiety disorders, mood disorders, schizophrenia, and borderline personality. All original readings (no textbook). Questions are raised about the use of psychiatric drugs, and attention is paid to the history of insanity. This course includes both textbook and original readings. Also listed as DS 211 .
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    PSY 240 - Child Development


    4 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to human development with an emphasis on early and middle childhood. Initial discussion focuses on how to best characterize behavioral change over time and the interactive roles of nature and nurture as facilitators of change. Through detailed discussion of theory and research outcomes, students attain a comprehensive understanding of normative trends in physical, cognitive, social, emotional, and personality development coupled with an understanding of the cause of such change.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C.
  
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    PSY 242 - Psychology of Intergroup Relations


    4 credit(s)
    Develops an understanding of intergroup relations. Specifically, you will learn about social identity, social cognition, categorization, and best practices in promoting positive intergroup relations. We will explore these concepts by examining social psychological theories and research in prejudice, discrimination, and diversity. Students will develop an understanding of the frameworks and methods we use to study intergroup relations, the effects of stereotypes and prejudice both from the perceiver’s and the target’s perspective, and strategies that can be used to reduce intergroup biases and conflict.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: International Perspectives; Diverse Perspectives.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C; ENGW 180 , ENGW 181  or ENGW 182  
  
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    PSY 252 - BIOPSY I: Introduction to Neuroscience


    4 credit(s)
    This lecture and laboratory course seeks to explain and identify the biological structures of behavior, relating to actions, experience, genetics and phylogeny of the organism. Students learn physiological function and brain injury sparing, assessment, and recovery through case studies, discussion, video, dissection and lecture. The goals of this course are to provide students with a strong background in neuroscience, neuroanatomy, neuropsychological assessment, and the ability to apply their knowledge to individual trauma case examples. This the first course in the Department of Psychology’s Neuroscience Emphasis (PSY 252, PSY 352 , PSY 452 ). Should a student choose to complete this three-course series, it is permissible to enroll in the courses out of sequence.
    Prerequisite(s): PSY 150  with a minimum grade of C BIOL-110 or BIOL 200 , and BIOL-231 or BIOL-240 strongly recommended.
  
 

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