Sep 28, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Pharmacy

  
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    PHRM 751 - Creating Professional Leaders


    1 credit(s)
    This elective course provides students with an opportunity to further develop their knowledge and skill set regarding leadership. The concepts covered will include, but not be limited to: what is leadership, are leaders born or made, scientific analysis of leadership, importance of volunteer leadership, networking, and differences between leadership and management. The course is taught in a seminar/discussion format and will feature a variety of guest speakers. Discussion and interactive activities will be based on readings, assignments, experiences, and projects. The basic structure of the course will be a one hour course introduction meeting, followed by 5 three hour gatherings scattered throughout the semester. This course is part of the Master of Healthcare Administration dual degree program and Pharmacy Leadership and Practice Management Track. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 755 - Advanced Management Concepts


    1 credit(s)
    This elective course provides students with an opportunity to develop their knowledge of selected advanced concepts in the management of pharmacy practice. Topics covered include business planning, budget forecasting, marketing and personnel management. The course is taught in a seminar format, with reading and discussion of real practice examples. Each student will complete a written project and oral presentation.
  
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    PHRM 758 - Research Elective


    1-4 credit(s)
    This elective course is designed for motivated and creative students who are interested in research and research methods. The course aims to provide students with the opportunity to acquire skills and concepts inherent in both theoretical and experimental of pharmaceutical research. In addition, students are introduced to research techniques as well as research literatures.
  
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    PHRM 759 - Independent Study


    0-12 credit(s)
    See department for details. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 760 - Topics in Emergency Medicine


    1 credit(s)
    This elective course will provide students with the opportunity to further develop and practice their skills in the assessment and management of acutely ill and injured patients. Example topics may include: cardiac and neurological emergencies, rapid sequence intubation and airway management, procedural sedation, toxicology, illicit drugs, trauma, sepsis, and organ failure. The course will be taught in a discussion/seminar format and learning methods will include discussion, readings, journal/clinical pearls club, case-based scenarios and guest speakers who practice full time in the emergency/acute care setting. Assessment will be based upon brief quizzes, a journal presentation and assignments.
  
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    PHRM 762 - Leadership Skills & Abilities


    1 credit(s)
    The Pharmacy Leadership and Practice Mangement Track allows students to earn a specialization in the skills and abilities required for effective leadership. The first of 5 courses, Leadership Skills will provide an introduction to leadership, description of various ledership styles, criteria for selection of appropriate styles, as well as techniques of emotional intellegence and self-management. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 763 - Ethical Decision Making


    1 credit(s)
    This course will expose the student to skills and techniques necessary to perform ethical discernment in leadership roles.  The student will review and apply ethical principles to bring clarity to current bioethical controversies in healthcare.  In the process of reviewing these general principles, students are expected to consider and develop your own prioritized values that will apply to your anticipated leadership roles in your future organizations.  The course is taught in a seminar/discussion format and will feature a variety of guest speakers. Discussion and interactive activities will be based on readings, assignments, experiences, projects, and presentations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 764 - Leadership & Practice Mgmt Practicum I


    2 credit(s)
    The Pharmacy Leadership and Practice Management Track allows students to earn a specialization in the skills and abilities required for effective leadership. The Leadership and Practice Management Practicum is an online course offered in the third experiential year to enhance the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) coursework. In the fourth of 5 courses, students will complete a guided reflection on leadership practices at their sites and integrate leadership curriculum presented in the P1 and P2 Leadership Track Courses. Students will participate in an online discussion board and complete leadership case studies. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 765 - Leader & Practice Mgmt Practicum II


    2 credit(s)
    The Pharmacy Leadership and Practice Management Track allows students to earn a specialization in the skills and abilities required for effective leadership. The Leadership and Practice Management Practicum is an online course offered in the third experiential year to enhance the Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) coursework. In the fifth of 5 courses, students will complete a guided reflection on leadership practices at their sites and integrate leadership curriculum presented in the P1 and P2 Leadership Track Courses. Students will participate in an online discussion board and complete leadership case studies. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 766 - Special Topics


    1-6 credit(s)
    See department for course description.
  
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    PHRM 767 - Pharmacogenomics


    2 credit(s)
    This elective will focus on pharmacogenomics and how it influences pharmacy now and in the future. We will start with the basics of genomics and sequencing projects, move into clinical correlates, case studies and interactive exercises and also consider the ethical challenges of pharmacogenomics. The format will be a mix of lectures by pharmacy practice and science faculty, outside speakers and student presentations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 768 - Person-Centered Care in PM


    1 credit(s)
    According to the NIH, Precision Medicine (PM) “takes into account individual variability in environment, lifestyle and genes for each person.” This course will explore novel approaches to person-centered care and examine how a patient’s individual understanding of their condition may transcend the medical diagnosis. It is designed to complement the pharmacogenomics course and extend the students understanding of Precision Medicine beyond the genome by focusing on that which makes us human. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 769 - Precision Medicine Capstone


    1-3 credit(s)
    Students will work with a faculty mentor to design and complete a capstone project that includes a self-directed study. The capstone project will involve substantial independent work and integrate knowledge from throughout the student’s major field of study with their creative scholarly project. The capstone project will be in the form of a poster, a manuscript, or an oral presentation. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 770 - Research & Scholarship Capstone


    2 credit(s)
    Pharmacy students have the opportunity to engage in various scholarly and creative activities throughout their years of study, such as research elective courses. Students will work with a faculty mentor to design and complete a capstone project that includes independent study and analysis of experimental or scientific literature. The capstone project will involve substantial independent work and integrate knowledge from throughout the student’s major field of study with their creative scholarly project. The capstone project will be in the form of a poster, a manuscript, or an oral presentation. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 771 - Underserved Care Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    Innovative approach to learning about issues pertinent to the practice of pharmacy and addressing issues of population health in rural and/or underserved communities. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 772 - Rural Health Care Reflection


    0.5 credit(s)
    Students will work on an assignment to critically reflect on their IPP3 experience in regards to rural health and/or care for underserved populations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 773 - Underserved Populations Capstone


    0.5-3 credit(s)
    Students will work with a faculty mentor to design and complete a capstone project that includes a self-directed study. The capstone project will involve substantial independent work and integrate knowledge from throughout the student’s major field of study with their creative scholarly project. The capstone project will be in the form of a poster, a manuscript, or an oral presentation. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 774 - Special Topics: Underserved Populations


    1-6 credit(s)
    See department for course description. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 775 - Career Pathways in Pharmacy


    1 credit(s)
    Through this self-paced, online course, students will learn about various careers within the field of pharmacy and explore which career options may be a good fit based on individualized factors. Additionally, students will be introduced to continuous professional development principles, practices, and job requirements. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 776 - Approach to Patient Care


    1 credit(s)
    A seminar format course exploring common pharmacy practice settings including acute care, managed care, ambulatory care, and community pharmacy. Track faculty, invited panelists, or guest lecturers will facilitate students’ self-directed learning, focusing on patient assessment methods, communication strategies, and the environment of care and how to apply these skills and attitudes to patient-centered care in each practice setting. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 777 - Advanced Clinical Sciences


    1 credit(s)
    A seminar format where students research and present formal disease state reviews and care plans to Clinical Practice Track faculty and track students. Development and delivery of the presentation will be guided by a faculty mentor. Presentations will include: pathophysiology, drug targets, diagnostics and patient presentation, treatment algorithms, drug selection, practice guidelines, and standards of practice. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 778 - Evidence Based Medicine


    1 credit(s)
    A discussion and activity format where students work with Clinical Practice Track faculty utilizing real world literature examples as a means to build evidenced based medicine skills and knowledge. Choice of articles and guidelines will be guided by faculty but drawn from enrolled student interest areas. Preparation before each session will include readings and videos focused on: guidelines, literature searching methods, study designs, biostatistical concepts, and critical appraisal methods. Students will present a journal club focused on: critically analyzing and concisely summarizing the literature, creating a one page article summary handout, and discussing practice implications of the study findings. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 779 - Clinical Practice Capstone & Portfolio


    1-3 credit(s)
    Students will work with a faculty mentor to design and complete a capstone project that includes a self-directed study. The capstone project will involve substantial independent work and integrate knowledge from throughout the student’s major field of study with their creative scholarly project. Site or other preceptors may be involved in guiding the student on their clinical or patient education capstone project. The capstone project will be in the form of a poster, a manuscript, or an oral presentation. Under the guidance of their faculty mentor and preceptors, students will document completion of their self-reflective, clinical, and co-curricular activities and assignments in their School of Pharmacy portfolio. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 780 - Reflective Practice & Portfolio Development III


    0.5 credit(s)
    This is the third course of three in the series relating to introduction of self-reflection and portfolio development. Students will continue to cultivate the cognitive habits necessary for reflective practice, lifelong learning, and personal and professional development. Students will document their curricular, co-curricular, and normal life experiences and use these documents to generate learning, assessment, and/or showcase portfolios in the service of the program’s learning outcomes.

    Students will finish developing methods of demonstrating competency relative to ACPE standards 3 and 4. Pass/No Pass.

  
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    PHRM 800 - Research Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    Presentation and discussion of student research projects and relevant primary literature. Will involve presentations and discussions of literature and research findings related to pharmaceutical sciences by invited speakers including faculty, external researchers and students. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 801 - Research Elective


    1-8 credit(s)
    Faculty-advised research and laboratory training culminating as part of a thesis project. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 802 - Adv Topics Pharmaceutical Science


    1 credit(s)
    Special topics in pharmaceutical science will be covered that highlight faculty expertise and supplement content introduced in the PharmD curriculum. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 803 - Scientific Communication I


    1 credit(s)
    Will utilize an example and exercise-based approach to develop researchers in becoming more effective writers and presenters. Topics include: scientific method, research design, principles of good writing, scientific manuscript formatting, peer-review and publication processes, scientific poster preparation, and presentation skills. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 804 - Scientific Communication II


    1 credit(s)
    Will utilize an example and exercise-based approach to develop researchers in becoming more effective writers and presenters. Topics include: scientific method, research design, principles of good writing, scientific manuscript formatting, peer-review and publication processes, scientific poster preparation, and presentation skills. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 805 - Thesis


    1 credit(s)
    Provides guidelines and organizational structure to prepare students to defend their research project, which includes a comprehensive investigation of the scientific literature and original research on a current topic in the field of pharmaceutical sciences. Presentation of the research project including literature background, methods, aims, and preliminary data in the seminar class and thesis defense will be included. May be repeated for credit. Pass/No Pass.

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL 100 - Introduction to Philosophy


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to philosophical issues in epistemology, metaphysics, and value theory including such topics as the nature and sources of knowledge, freedom and determinism, the relation of mind and body, personal identity, the relation of knowledge and values.
    Offered: Offered annually.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
  
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    PHIL 202 - Ethics and Society


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to ethical theories and their application to a variety of moral problems and contemporary ethical issues. We will pay special attention to questions of personal conduct. How should I live? How do my personal choices affect society? What values should guide my decision-making? What would it mean for me to live an ethical life?
    Offered: Offered annually Counts toward core requirement: Civic Engagement.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and Civic Engagement.
  
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    PHIL 205 - Ancient Philosophy


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the major issues and personalities that constituted and shaped early western thought, from the pre-socratics (sixth century BCE) through the Hellenistic and Roman era (fourth century CE).
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    PHIL 206 - Medieval Philosophy


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the major issues and personalities that constituted and shaped medieval western thought from the fourth century through the fifteenth century.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    PHIL 207 - Early Modern Philosophy 1500-1800


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the major issues and personalities that constituted and shaped modern western thought from the sixteenth century through the eighteenth century.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    PHIL 208 - Late Modern Phil 1800-2000


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the major issues and personalities that constituted and shaped modern western thought from the nineteenth century through the twentieth century.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
  
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    PHIL 212 - Language and Logic


    4 credit(s)
    A survey of formal syntactic and semantic features of language, including topics such as sentential logic, predicate logic, axiomatic systems and set theory, and nonclassical extensions such as multivalued logics. Also listed as MATH 212 . Does not meet Humanities core requirement (2010 catalog).
    Offered: Offered annually.

  
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    PHIL 240 - Human Rights


    2 credit(s)
    This course offers an in-depth investigation of conceptual and political issues related to rights and human rights, including such issues as the source and extent of rights, the nature of rights- bearers, the justification of rights claims, the legitimacy and means of implementing universal human rights and critiques and evaluations of the social role of rights. Also listed as PSJ 240.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
  
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    PHIL 275 - Internship


    1-4 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    PHIL 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    PHIL 304 - Philosophy of Art


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of the arts, including such topics as the nature of art, the metaphysics of art (e.g., form, expression, art as process vs. art as object) the epistemology of art (e.g., the locus of meaning in art, what constitutes artistic understanding, can art be “true”), and the axiology of art (e.g., art and morals, the social significance of art, how can art be evaluated). Besides general philosophical issues connected to art, particular arts will be considered (e.g., painting, dance, music, theatre, film, architecture).
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 305 - Asian Philosophy


    4 credit(s)
    A study of Asian philosophical texts both historical and contemporary from various cultures, focusing for example on the Hinduism of India, the Taoism of China, and the Zen Buddhism of Japan.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: International Perspectives and Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 307 - Ethics, Medicine & Health Care


    4 credit(s)
    A study of some ethical issues connected with medicine and health care: medical fallibility, cultural sensitivity in medical services, disability issues, economic and social inequalities, cultural relativism & medical intervention, racism, global health problems, and pharmaceutical issues. Also listed as DS 307 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 309 - Philosophy of Religion


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of the nature of religion and the truth of religious claims as interpreted by both historical and contemporary philosophers and theologians. Topics may include among others: the existence and nature of God, the quality and significance of religious experiences, and the origins of religion as a natural phenomenon.
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 310 - Philosophy of Science


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of issues and concepts within science and about science, including such topics as the nature of explanation, the nature of confirmation, the nature of scientific progress, the relations among science, technology, values and society.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Four credits of Philosophy courses.
  
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    PHIL 314 - Philosophy of Mind


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of the nature of mind and consciousness as interpreted by contemporary philosophers of mind. What is consciousness? Who has it? How is it produced?
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Four credits of Philosophy courses.
  
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    PHIL 315 - Philosophy of Law


    4 credit(s)
    An introduction to philosophical issues within and about law, including such topics as the nature of law, legal reasoning, liberty/rights and the limits of law, the nature of legal responsibility, the nature and justification of legal punishment.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 321 - Environmental Ethics


    4 credit(s)
    A study of the key concepts in environmental ethics, such as biodiversity loss, corporate responsibility, animal rights, over-population, and environmental racism. Also listed as ENV 321 .
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above (30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 322 - Animal Ethics


    4 credit(s)
    An investigation of the relationship between human and non-human animals. What is the moral standing of non-human animals? We will study both the theoretical and practical facets of this question by focusing on the ethical dilemmas and practices involving animals, including animal experimentation, factory farming, and companion animals. Also listed as ENV 322 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirements: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts and Sustainability.
    Prerequisite(s): Sophomore standing or above(30 or more completed).
  
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    PHIL 333 - Sports Ethics


    4 credit(s)
    This course examines the principles of ethical reasoning as applied to sport. Issues relevant to a wide range of areas in competitive and recreational sport are covered, such as moral reasoning, sportsmanship and gamesmanship, sport violence and intimidation, commercialization, racial and gender equity, as well as technological and ergogenic aids. Previously Listed As: PHIL 221
    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
  
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    PHIL 343 - Studies in Criticism & Theory


    4 credit(s)
    A study and application of some of the critical and theoretical approaches used in the study of literature. Also listed as ENGL 343 .
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Analyzing and Interpreting Texts.
    Prerequisite(s): 2 of 200-level ENGL.
  
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    PHIL 349 - Research and Dissemination


    2-4 credit(s)
    This course introduces philosophy students to public research dissemination; students will develop a previously written essay for publication or presentation, researching relevant literatures and venues. Topics of study and discussion will include research methods, thesis development, situating work in philosophical literature and dialectic, and the role of philosophy in the world. Students will also discuss, plan, and execute the Undergraduate Philosophy Conference hosted at Pacific.  Once for credit.
    Offered: Annually.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor consent
  
  
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    PHIL 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    PHIL 403 - Twentieth Century Philosophy


    4 credit(s)
    An intensive study of the major issues and personalities in twentieth-century philosophy, in such movements and schools as pragmatism, existentialism, phenomenology, positivism, linguistic analysis, structuralism, poststructuralism, and critical theory.
    Offered: Offered intermittently.

    Core Requirement(s): Counts toward core requirement: Historical Context.
    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 208  plus one other course in the history of philosophy: PHIL 205 , PHIL 206 , or PHIL 207 
  
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    PHIL 405 - Topics in Moral Philosophy


    2 credit(s)
    An intensive study in a specific topic in moral philosophy.
    Offered: Offered alternate years.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 202 
  
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    PHIL 475 - Internship


    0-12 credit(s)
    See department for details. Internship contract required.
  
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    PHIL 494 - Senior Seminar I


    2 credit(s)
    Required of all philosophy majors in the fall of the senior year; in the spring majors are required to enroll in PHIL 495 . The purpose of this seminar is to prepare the student to produce a philosophical essay of significant length and quality, a senior thesis. This project will require researching, writing, defending, and perhaps publishing the essay. In PHIL 494 students will research and prepare a substantial prospectus for the senior thesis; students will also read, discuss and critique the work of other members of the seminar.
    Offered: Offered annually in the fall term.

    Prerequisite(s): 18 in philosophy, PHIL 212 , and one course in the history of PHIL (PHIL 205 , PHIL 206 , PHIL 207 , or PHIL 208 ), each with a C- or better.
  
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    PHIL 495 - Senior Seminar II


    2 credit(s)
    Required of all philosophy majors in the senior year; in the fall majors are required to enroll in PHIL 494 . The purpose of this seminar is for each student to produce a philosophical essay of significant length and quality, a senior thesis. This project will require researching, writing, defending, and perhaps publishing the essay. In PHIL 495 students will write and defend the senior thesis; students will also read, discuss, and critique the work of other members of the seminar. Instructor’s consent required.
    Offered: Offered Spring semester.

    Prerequisite(s): PHIL 494 

Physical Therapy

  
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    DPT 500 - Human Anatomy I


    4 credit(s)
    Advanced study of the gross structure and histology of the human body. Special emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The course is organized by regions of the body, with the emphasis on the gross anatomy of each region. In addition, the microstructure specific to the tissues discussed will be studied. The course has a lecture and a laboratory component. The lab sessions will involve regional dissection of cadavers, and parallel the information covered in the lecture material. DPT 500 encompasses upper and lower extremities, including bones, joints, muscles, nerves, blood vessels and connective tissues.
  
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    DPT 501 - Human Anatomy II


    3 credit(s)
    Advanced study of the gross structure and histology of the human body. Special emphasis is placed on the musculoskeletal, nervous, cardiovascular and respiratory systems. The course is organized by regions of the body, with the emphasis on the gross anatomy of each region. In addition, the microstructure specific to the tissues discussed will be studied. The course has a lecture and a laboratory component. The lab sessions will involve regional dissection of cadavers, and parallel the information covered in the lecture material. DPT 501 is a study of the back, head and neck, thorax, abdominal wall and abdominal contents.
  
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    DPT 510 - Clinical Biomechanics I


    4 credit(s)
    DPT 510 and DPT 511  are designed to provide the student with the biomechanical and histological basis for understanding normal and pathological movement. All of DPT 510 and part of DPT 511  are organized by anatomical region, and although each region is discussed as a unit, every effort is made to illustrate continuities among regions. The discussion of each region includes sections on normal biomechanics and the application of biomechanics to pathological motion. Each section incorporates units on goniometry, muscle testing, stretching, design of exercise programs and palpation. The remainder of DPT 511  covers posture, scoliosis, and gait analysis
  
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    DPT 511 - Clinical Biomechanics II


    4 credit(s)
    DPT 510 and 511 are designed to provide the student with the biomechanical and histological basis for understanding normal and pathological movement. All of DPT 510 and part of DPT 511 are organized by anatomical region, and although each region is discussed as a unit, every effort is made to illustrate continuities among regions. The discussion of each region includes sections on normal biomechanics and the application of biomechanics to pathological motion. Each section incorporates units on goniometry, muscle testing, stretching, design of exercise programs and palpation. The remainder of DPT 511 covers posture, scoliosis, and gait analysis.
  
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    DPT 520 - Rehabilitation Neuroscience I


    4 credit(s)
    Introduction to clinically relevant neuroscience. Topics include: neuroanatomy, cellular and intercellular physiology, neuroplasticity, development of the nervous system, and the somatic, autonomic, and motor systems. Neural disorders commonly encountered in practice and differential diagnosis are emphasized. Students are expected to fully participate throughout the course in: group discussions of neuroscience, case reports and case studies; inquiry sessions; laboratory and computer-based experiences; and problem-based learning.
  
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    DPT 522 - Rehab Neuroscience II & Motor Control


    3 credit(s)
    Continuation of Rehabilitation Neuroscience I. Topics include: peripheral nervous system, spinal region, cranial nerves, brain stem region, auditory, vestibular, and visual systems, cerebrum, blood supply to the nervous system, and the cerebrospinal fluid system. Concepts of Motor Control will be introduced. Neural disorders commonly encountered in practice and differential diagnosis are emphasized. Active learning, as described for DPT 520 , continues in this course.
  
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    DPT 530 - Physical Agents & Mechanical Modalities


    3 credit(s)
    A comprehensive coverage of biophysical principles, physiological effects, clinical techniques and applications with an emphasis on problem solving and clinical decision making. Topics include massage, superficial and deep heat, hydrotherapy, cryotherapy, traction, compression therapies and continuous passive motion, iontophoresis, electrical muscle stimulation, transcutaneous electrical stimulation, biofeedback and an introduction to nerve conduction velocity and electromyography. The course includes lectures, clinical skill laboratories, use of interactive audiovisual programs for clinical decision making, abstract writing and class presentations of current research in physical agents.
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of all courses in preceding semester.
  
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    DPT 540 - Patient Assess Interv Ther Modalities


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to provide the student with basic patient care and technical skills in applying, planning, and progressing exercise programs. Topics include: measurement of vital signs, the science of exercise prescription, range-of-motion, stretching, strengthening, use of various exercise equipment, relaxation, fitness, stress reduction, and assistive gait. A strong emphasis is placed on peer collaboration and solving fundamental clinical problems, including evaluation, assessment, and treatment of functional mobility limitations.
  
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    DPT 542 - Prin of Ther Exer Prog & Motor Learning


    3 credit(s)
    This course covers exercise program progressions for patients and clients across the lifespan in a variety of settings. Principles are addressed through lecture, group work, and laboratory experiences. Concepts of motor learning are introduced and applied to common clinical situations. Therapeutic exercise is presented as a procedural intervention to reduce impairments and activity limitations in a variety of patient populations, as well as a mechanism to improve health and wellness in non-clinical population.
  
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    DPT 561 - Foundations of the PT Profession I


    1 credit(s)
    This course introduces the student to the history and sociology of the physical therapy profession and its role in the health care system. Additional areas of study include professionalism and professional behavior, the role of professional organizations, professional writing, learning styles, political aspects of health care, roles of other health professionals, documentation, medical terminology, and the functions of the rehabilitation team.
  
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    DPT 562 - Foundations of the PT Profession II


    1 credit(s)
    Continuation of documentation, roles of other health care professionals, and professional behavior topics from DPT 561 . Additional topics include professional communication, and state and federal health care legislation including HIPAA, Medicare, and licensing boards.
  
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    DPT 570 - Clinical Education Experience I


    4 credit(s)
    These courses emphasize application and integration of academic/didactic coursework into the clinical setting. Students are directly supervised by licensed physical therapists in community-based clinical sites available throughout the US and internationally. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 590 - Research Methods and Statistics


    2 credit(s)
    An introduction to the research process. Includes research design, ethical and legal considerations, hypothesis testing, review of statistical analysis and critical reviews of published research.
  
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    DPT 595 - Intro to Evidence Based Practice (EBP)


    2 credit(s)
    This course is designed to prepare physical therapy graduate students with the knowledge and skills to make informed judgments about the validity, results, and applicability of clinical research. The course will emphasize formation of answerable clinical questions and effective literature search strategies. Students will become prepared to judge evidence regarding the accuracy and validity of diagnostic tests and the effectiveness of clinical interventions.
  
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    DPT 612 - Neuromuscular Sys Exam/Intervention


    4 credit(s)
    Clinical application of observation skills for an individual’s motor function within environmental contexts and treatment intervention when a motor dysfunction exists will be explored. Examination skills will focus on development of movement analysis for motor control dysfunction across the life-span. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, WHO, 2002) will be used as the framework with emphasis placed on participation in meaningful contexts. Documentation, goal writing, and measurement of outcomes will be incorporated. Clinical decision making will be developed as the learner selects, applies, and justifies treatment interventions for specific patient-centered functional goals. Interventions presented will include remediation, compensation, facilitation, motor learning, and entry-level decision making regarding orthotics for patients presenting with neurologic impairments. Laboratory components will focus on identifying typical motor development and abilities across the lifespan and application of examination of and interventions for patients presenting with cerebral vascular accident, traumatic brain injury, and vestibular and balance disturbances.
  
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    DPT 613 - Neuromuscular System Exam/Interv II


    2 credit(s)
    This course will focus on the specific health conditions/pathologies of acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) and progressive neurological conditions. Examination and interventions for these populations will be structured within the ICF framework. In addition, students will gain entry-level competencies in client-centered orthotic and wheelchair prescription/acquisition with an emphasis on facilitation of independent mobility participation and/or positioning and support regardless of age. Understanding and identifying issues of environmental accessibility will also be incorporated into total patient evaluation. Collaboration with health professional colleagues in occupational therapy and speech and language pathology will be introduced.
  
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    DPT 632 - Musculoskeletal Exam/Int for Spine


    4 credit(s)
    This course covers etiology, pathology, examination and intervention related to conditions of the TMJ, cervical, thoracic, lumbar and pelvic regions of the body. Examination schema will be presented in a regional approach, and will include relevant procedures to screen for medical disease. Intervention techniques will include passive movement, neural tissue mobilization, therapeutic exercise, muscle energy and other clinical techniques. Physical therapy intervention will be directed at resolution of specific impairments and functional limitations, but will also address contributing factors and prophylaxis.
  
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    DPT 633 - Musc Exam/Intv for Extremities


    3 credit(s)
    An in-depth study of musculoskeletal impairments and functional limitations of children and adults. The course includes pathology, medical evaluation and physical therapy examination. Students will also plan and execute therapeutic interventions. The course consists of lecture, laboratory practice, student research, student presentations and problem solving activities. The course is organized by anatomic region. DPT 630 covers the upper and lower extremities.
  
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    DPT 642 - Clinical Education Experience II


    6 credit(s)
    These courses emphasize application and integration of academic/didactic coursework into the clinical setting. Students are directly supervised by licensed physical therapists in community-based clinical sites available throughout the US and internationally. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 650 - Infect Immune & Metabl Dz


    3 credit(s)
    This course examines basic cellular and molecular processes that underlie many of the diagnoses encountered as physical therapists. General concepts of pathology are presented with a focus on the pathophysiology and medical conditions of selected organ systems. This course includes the study of inflammation/ immunology, infectious diseases and metabolism. The definition, incidence, etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations are discussed for the most common medical conditions related to each system. Standard medical therapies are discussed, including pharmacological and surgical interventions. An emphasis is placed upon differential screening and recognition of medical complications that require precautions or represent contraindications to physical therapy treatment. In addition this course is designed to provide skills related to medical screening through physical examination and evaluation.
  
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    DPT 653 - Physiology & Pharmacology I


    4 credit(s)
    This course focuses on physiologic principles as they relate to optimal human function and efficient movement. The definition, incidence, etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations of common respiratory, cardiovascular, muscle, and, endocrine conditions are discussed. Integration of medical and physical therapy management of diseases and disorders is emphasized. Pharmacodynamics of specific drug classes and their effects on rehabilitation are discussed. Evaluations, functional treatment plans, and direct interventions to improve functional performance in healthy individuals as well as individuals with varied chronic diseases are taught. Physical exams and direct interventions for pulmonary and cardiac systems will be practiced in laboratory sessions.
  
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    DPT 654 - Physiology & Pharmacology II


    2 credit(s)
    Content includes the pathophysiology and medical conditions of renal, genitourinary, gastrointestinal, lymph, and integumentary systems. The definition, incidence, etiology, pathogenesis, and clinical manifestations for the most common medical conditions related to each system are discussed. Standard medical therapies are discussed including pharmacological and surgical interventions. Emphasis is placed upon differential screening and recognition of medical complications that require precautions or represent contraindications to physical therapy intervention. This course is designed to provide skills related to medical screening through physical examination and evaluation. Direct interventions including patient instruction, therapeutic exercise, functional training, and community integration are considered and practiced when indicated.
  
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    DPT 670 - Psych Aspects of Illness/Disability


    2 credit(s)
    This course presents a survey of emotional, behavioral and social effects of injury, illness or disability on patients, their families and other interpersonal relationships. The interpersonal relationship between health professional and patient is emphasized. Clinical experiences are used as illustrations of theoretical material.
  
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    DPT 680 - Geriatrics and Gerontology


    3 credit(s)
    This course is an introduction to the issues facing older persons in the areas of health, health care policy and sociocultural expectations. It addresses the issues surrounding the burgeoning aging population; the common pathologies and impairments that are associated with the over 65 population in the context of normal vs. usual aging of the cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular and integumentary systems; and documentation and reimbursement in the Medicare system. Discussions will include the benefits of exercise in prevention of and rehabilitation from functional limitations; home assessment, housing options and community resources; communication and education with the elderly; restraint use issues; and the issues surrounding elder abuse. Students will also critique many of the functional assessment tools used with this population.
  
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    DPT 685 - Pediatric Neuromuscular: Exam & Interv


    3 credit(s)
    Introduction to typical development of children, with a focus on motor development in the context of changing environments across the age span, and within the cultural considerations of childhood and family. Developmental disability diagnoses associated with impaired motor function from congenital or acquired disorders of the central nervous system or genetic abnormalities in infancy, childhood, and adolescence will be presented. Students will gain an appreciation for age appropriate developmental assessments, standardized instruments, and functional means to evaluate children with disabilities in various settings. Pediatric public school practice will be discussed and an appreciation for working with families and educators will be modeled.
  
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    DPT 693 - Advanced Evidence-Based Practice


    2 credit(s)
    This is the third course in the research, statistics, and evidence-based practice curriculum. Students will review concepts of internal and external validity and quantification of study results. In-depth analysis and utilization of systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and clinical practice guidelines will be presented and practiced. Additionally, students will participate in journal club activites covering a variety of physical therapy topics.
    Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of first-year coursework.
  
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    DPT 694 - Critically Appraised Topics


    1 credit(s)
    Students will work in small groups with a faculty advisor to develop a clinical question relating to diagnosis or treatment and answering that question with a critically appraised paper (CAT) using not more than 3 articles. The CAT will be presented to the class and faculty during the semester.
  
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    DPT 695 - Independent Study


    1-9 credit(s)
    This course is intended to allow a student to pursue a specialized or unique interest that is not part of the curriculum, but is related to it. It does not replace any required course. Typically, no more than one (1) of Independent Study may be taken per semester and no more than five (5) may be taken over the entire program.
  
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    DPT 701 - Principles Mgt & Supervision for PTs


    3 credit(s)
    An in-depth study of service operations management at the organizational and clinical department level is discussed. A focus on the full financial cycle from resource planning and budgeting through reimbursement is emphasized. Basic services of facilities operation and record keeping as well as case management and consulting are addressed. The physical therapist’s role as a leader for personal development as well as a human resource manager is discussed. Students learn the process of program and service line development, implementation, marketing, and outcome management. Current regulatory, legal, and policy and procedures that impact practice management are also presented.
  
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    DPT 710 - Clinical Reasoning Seminar


    2 credit(s)
    This course provides students with the opportunity to integrate their skills for evaluation, planning, and revision of interventions. Live and videotaped demonstrations of examinations and evaluations are presented in class. Small groups of students perform an examination of a patient, justify the tests and measurements performed, perform an evaluation (make clinical judgments), establish a diagnosis and prognosis for the patient, plan therapeutic interventions, and develop a plan for outcomes assessment. The students present the case to an audience of physical therapy students and interested people from the community. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 723 - Clinical Education Experience III


    10 credit(s)
    These courses emphasize application and integration of academic/didactic coursework into the clinical setting. Students are directly supervised by licensed physical therapists in community-based clinical sites available throughout the US and internationally. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 724 - Clinical Education Experience IV


    10 credit(s)
    These courses emphasize application and integration of academic/didactic coursework into the clinical setting. Students are directly supervised by licensed physical therapists in community-based clinical sites available throughout the US and internationally. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 725 - Clinical Education Experience V


    9 credit(s)
    These courses emphasize application and integration of academic/didactic coursework into the clinical setting. Students are directly supervised by licensed physical therapists in community-based clinical sites available throughout the US and internationally. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 730 - Professional Lecture Series


    2 credit(s)
    A series of lectures, demonstrations, or workshops focusing on specialties and other areas germane to the practice of physical therapy. Examples of topics included are hand orthotics, clinical education, woman’s health issues, professional communication, and industrial/ occupational health. Topics will be presented by faculty and other clinical experts. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 740 - Intro to Medical Imaging for PTs


    1 credit(s)
    The course includes basic principles of radiology and develops a systematic approach to viewing radiographs. The course is interactive in that students will participate in viewing and describing radiographs and discussing findings with the members of the class. An introduction to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is also included. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 746 - Amputation Rehabilitation


    2 credit(s)
    This course examines amputation rehabilitation from prior to the amputation surgery through gait and balance training for those people who are appropriate for prosthetic limbs. Topics covered include incidence and etiology, post-operative care, pre-prosthetic care, gait and balance training, functional mobility, and prosthetic componentry. Both upper and lower extremity amputations will be discussed, as well as considerations for working with pediatric patients. Also included is a discussion on footcare for those with diabetes.
  
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    DPT 750 - Bioethics Seminar for PTs


    0.25-1 credit(s)
    Identification and analysis of ethical issues facing physical therapists in their relationships with patients, peers, the healthcare community, and society as a whole. Taken for 0.25 credit for 4 semesters and in 5th semester for 1, for a total of 2 credits. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 790 - Evidence Based Capstone Project


    1-2 credit(s)
    Students will use evidence-based principles to develop a clinical question dealing with diagnosis or treatment. Working individually, students will conduct a complete literature review or two smaller reviews using 8-12 (total) research articles. The clinical question will be answered with a written Critically Appraised Topic (CAT) that will be presented with either a platform or a poster presentation to the School of Physical Therapy in the spring of the final year. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    DPT 792 - Education Strategies for PTs


    2 credit(s)
    Educational strategies for designing and teaching in clinical, community, and academic settings. Learning theory is emphasized with a focus on applications in instruction related to physical therapy. Students select topics to teach to each other, offering constructive critique and support.
 

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