Oct 20, 2020  
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 
    
Academic Catalog 2019-2020 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Courses


 

Optometry

  
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    OPT 772 - Third Year ODST/Low Vision Service


    1.5 credit(s)
    Supervised optometric clinical assessment and management of patients with ocular disease, highlighting the use of special testing procedures as well as management of patients requiring low vision care and devices in Pacific University affiliated clinics. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 777 - CSI: Optometry (Clinic Sci Integration)


    2 credit(s)
    A small group, interactive, case-based, problem oriented course which encourages refinement of clinical reasoning and decision making skills in a wide variety of diagnostic and management aspects of individual patient care. Designed to improve integration of knowledge and skills learned in the basic and clinical sciences, as well as the use of evidence based resources, the course will begin with faculty directed learning and move towards self-directed learning as it proceeds.
  
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    OPT 779 - Advanced Ocular Surface Dryness


    1 credit(s)
    Evidence-based, advanced diagnostic and treatment procedures for ocular surface dryness will be covered.
  
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    OPT 780 - Advanced Laser & Surgical Techniques


    1 credit(s)
    Evaluating and assessing pre-operative opthalmic and general medical indications for optometric laser and associated procedures, including surgical-based anatomy/physiology, contraindications, risks, and benefits. Managing systemic and ocular complications that may be associated with optometric laser and associated procedures, including anesthesia. Obtaining appropriate informed consent, and providing acute and long-term post-operative care. Topics include anterior segment opthalmic laser procedures, office-based procedures, including light-based radiofrequency treatment, and local and topical anesthesia. Classroom instruction and laboratory simulation-based training using various surgical models, with objective structured assessment of technical skills.
  
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    OPT 806 - Patient Care VIII


    11.0 credit(s)
    Supervised and direct patient care in various specialty tracks within Pacific University affiliated clinics (Tracks 1-4) or in affiliated hospital settings, health care centers, and public or private eye and vision care centers, consisting of primary care and/or specialized health care services unique to each site (Track 5). Students may apply toward graduation one of the tracks numbered 1-4 a maximum of one time. Descriptions of all 5 tracks can be found in the Doctor of Optometry Degree Requirement section of the catalog. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 807 - Patient Care IX


    11.0 credit(s)
    Supervised and direct patient care in various specialty tracks within Pacific University affiliated clinics (Tracks 1-4) or in affiliated hospital settings, health care centers, and public or private eye and vision care centers, consisting of primary care and/or specialized health care services unique to each site (Track 5). Students may apply toward graduation one of the tracks numbered 1-4 a maximum of one time. Descriptions of all 5 tracks can be found in the Doctor of Optometry Degree Requirement section of the catalog. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 808 - Patient Care X


    11.0 credit(s)
    Supervised and direct patient care in various specialty tracks within Pacific University clinics (Tracks 1-4) or in affiliated hospital settings, health care centers, and public or private eye and vision care centers, consisting of primary care and/or specialized health care services unique to each site (Track 5). Students may apply toward graduation one of the tracks numbered 1-4 a maximum of one time. Descriptions of all 5 tracks can be found in the Doctor of Optometry Degree Requirement section of the catalog. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 809 - Patient Care XI


    11.0 credit(s)
    Supervised and direct patient care in various specialty tracks within Pacific University affiliated clinics (Tracks 1-4) or in affiliated hospital settings, health care centers, and public or private eye and vision care centers, consisting of primary care and/or specialized health care services unique to each site (Track 5). Students may apply toward graduation one of the tracks numbered 1-4 a maximum of one time. Descriptions of all 5 tracks can be found in the Doctor of Optometry Degree Requirement section of the catalog. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 827 - Web-Based Clinical Rounds


    0.5 credit(s)
    Online, evidence-based discussions, supported by cited Web-based and library referenced literature, utilizing student presented patient cases from externships sites. Cases illustrate evaluation and management of refractive, binocular, accommodative, disease, and visual information processing disorders.
  
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    OPT 836 - Seminar in Opt Practice Management


    1 credit(s)
    This elective reinforces basic knowledge of finance, financial planning and practice financial analysis. The focus is primarily at the practical level of practice/business life. Students completing the course will gain skills in reading financial information including balance sheets, profit & loss statements, and cash flow statements. They will learn how to assess the financial health of a practice through targeted benchmarks and trend analysis. An overview of contracts, employment agreements, and partnership agreements are included.
  
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    OPT 856 - Independent Study


    0.5-15 credit(s)
  
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    OPT 906 - Seminar in Public Health


    1 credit(s)
    Review of current literature on issues related to public health. Students will read current issues of selected journals and present reports of relevant articles. Special topics will be assigned for more extensive student reports. Presentations on public health topics will be given by faculty members and invited guests. May be repeated, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 909 - Seminar in Color Vision


    1 credit(s)
    Review of current literature on color vision. Students will read current issues of selected journals and present reports of relevant articles. Special topics will be assigned for more extensive student reports. Presentations on color vision will be given by faculty members and invited guests. May be repeated, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 914 - Discussion of Optometric Clinical Care


    1 credit(s)
    Observation of optometric clinical practice and discussions of patient care. May be repeated for credit, with a maximum of 3 credits applicable toward the degree. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OPT 916 - Seminar Functional Vision & Pediatrics


    1-3 credit(s)
    Review of current literature on functional vision and pediatrics. Students will read current issues of selected journals and present reports of relevant articles. Special topics will be assigned for more extensive student reports. Presentations on functional vision and pediatrics will be given by faculty members and invited guests. May be repeated for credit, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 918 - Seminar in Contact Lenses


    1 credit(s)
    Review of current literature on contact lenses. Students will read current issues of selected journals and present reports of relevant articles. Special topics will be assigned for more extensive student reports. Presentations on contact lenses will be given by faculty members and invited guests. May be repeated, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 956 - Independent Study


    1-12 credit(s)
    Coursework not covered by regular courses and arranged as independent study with an instructor. An independent study contract is required to register. Instructor’s consent required. hours are assigned by the instructor.
  
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    OPT 961 - Seminar Visual Info Processing


    1 credit(s)
    Review of current literature on information flow and analysis in the visual system. Students will read current issues of selected journals and present reports of relevant articles. Special topics will be assigned for more extensive student reports. Presentations on information processing will be given by faculty members and invited guests. May be repeated, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 970 - Teaching Experience


    1 credit(s)
    Participate in the teaching of a course or laboratory. Arranged with individual faculty members. Instructor’s consent required. May be repeated, with a maximum of 4 credits applicable toward the degree.
  
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    OPT 991 - Research & Data Analysis Methods I


    2 credit(s)
    Research design strategies and data analysis procedures. Use of computerized data recording, analysis, and reporting procedures will be stressed. Methods for preparing material for publication or oral presentation will be covered.
  
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    OPT 992 - Research & Data Analysis Methods II


    2 credit(s)
    Continuation of research design strategies and data analysis procedures. Use of computerized data recording, analysis, and reporting procedures will be stressed. Methods for preparing material for publication or oral presentation will be covered.

Outdoor Leadership

  
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    OL 107 - Wilderness First Responder


    2 credit(s)
    Through lecture, lab and practical application, students will be introduced to the necessary skills for assessing and treating common medical problems in remote settings. The methods and common practices for wilderness medicine introduced in this course give students both a competency for treating injuries and illness and the experience that improves judgment which may prevent potential incidents. Successfully completing this course also offers a two year certification by the Wilderness Medicine Training Center. Additional course fees apply. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    OL 110 - Introduction to Expedition Planning


    1 credit(s)
    Will give students the tools to help them plan for the elements of a group expedition in a rugged wilderness area outside of the United States. The focus of this course is developing students’ judgment, decision-making, and critical thinking skills so that they can more effectively participate on expeditionary trips. Students will also be exposed to cultural norms of the region we will travel to and inter-cultural communication. One of the primary outcomes of this course will bedeveloping a detailed plan through preliminary textual and Internet investigation, begin making contacts in the area of travel, and developing a risk management plan that students will use following the course.
    Offered: Offered in Fall.

  
  
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    OL 195 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    OL 205 - Outdoor Leadership Theory


    1 credit(s)
    This class is intended for anyone interested in learning to lead more effectively.  Introduction to the principles and practices of leading others using outdoor adventure trips as the construct for effective decision-making, managing group dynamics, and accomplishing clear objectives as a team.  Emphasis on learning how to teach using experiential education principles, on developing students’ group facilitation skills, and on making decisions to manage risks appropriately.  Students will learn leadership theories and apply these theories to case studies.  This course should be taken concurrently with Outdoor Leadership Practice (OL 206 ) unless approved by the instructor.
    Offered: Offered every Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): HPER 157  
    Corequisite(s): OL 206  
  
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    OL 206 - Outdoor Leadership Practice


    1 credit(s)
    This course will provide the knowledge and experience needed to implement basic outdoor leadership skills. Students will explore the following factors involved in trip planning:  determining trip objectives, understanding the participants, evaluating weather, selecting gear, reading maps, acquiring permits and practicing “leave no trace” principles.   Participation fee required for transportation, food, permits and campsites.  If a student drops or withdraws from the class after some expenses have been accrued, the student will be responsible for those expenses.  This class should be taken concurrently with Outdoor Leadership Theory (OL 205 ) unless approved by instructor. 
    Offered: Offered every Fall.

    Prerequisite(s): HPER 157  
    Corequisite(s): OL 205  
  
  
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    OL 295 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    OL 307 - Applied Outdoor Leadership


    4 credit(s)
    Focuses on developing students’ judgment, decision making and critical thinking skills to facilitate leading others on outdoor trips. Uses case studies and student-led trips with instructor supervision to increase students’ ability to handle challenging outdoor leadership experiences. Risk management, planning & logistics, leadership, environmental integration and teaching skills are developed. Content includes facilitating challenge experiences and group decision making. Involves weekend outdoor trips where these skills are applied, one of which is a required 9-day outing. Participation fee required to support special costs of class outings (e.g., transportation, food, campsites and permits). If a student drops or withdraws after some expenses have been accrued the student will be responsible for those.
    Prerequisite(s): OL 207  with minimum grade C-.
  
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    OL 308 - Rock Climbing Instructor


    2 credit(s)
    Students will develop their ability to lead single pitch sport climbs and traditional climbs. Students will learn how to manage the group climbing site, teach climbing movement, build traditional anchors, rappel, clean routes and coach trip participants.
    Prerequisite(s): Pass HPER 158  and OL 107 , and complete OL 207  with minimum grade of C-.
  
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    OL 309 - Kayaking Instructor


    2 credit(s)
    This course builds on fundamental white- and flat- water kayaking skills and introduces the student to group management on the water and navigation in more challenging waters. Mastery of chart and compass use, boat handling skills, multiday trip planning, and an eskimo roll are also addressed. Previous kayaking experience required.
    Prerequisite(s): HPER 159  and OL 107 ; and OL 207  with minimum grade of C-.
  
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    OL 310 - International Expedition


    2 credit(s)
    Allows students to apply the learning from OL 110  on adventure trip in an international setting. Students develop judgment, decision-making, and critical thinking skills so that they can more effectively plan and execute expeditionary trips on their own in the future. During travel, students will participate in a week-long wilderness expedition while working alongside local guides. Students will experience growth by opening themselves to new ways of thinking and seeing the world.
    Offered: Offered in Winter.

    Prerequisite(s): OL 110 .
  
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    OL 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details. Independent study contract required.
  
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    OL 407 - Outdoor Leadership Seminar


    1 credit(s)
    This course will help students synthesize the principles, practices, theories, ethics and philosophy presented throughout the pursuit of the Outdoor Leadership minor. It will also look at how leadership skills learned in the minor can be applied to future professions in the outdoors and within other careers. Participation fee required. The fee is used for class outings (i.e. transportation, food, campsites and permits). If a student drops or withdraws from the class after some expenses have been accrued the student will be responsible for those expenses.
    Prerequisite(s): OL 307  with minimum grade C-.
  
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    OL 475 - Internship


    See department for details. Internship contract required.

PACU

  
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    PACU 146 - Luau Company


    1 credit(s)
    Luau production activities (dance, music, technical). Minimum contribution of 30 documented hours. May be repeated for credit. Up to 8 activity credits may count toward the 124 credits required for graduation. Pass/No Pass.
  
  
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    PACU 200 - Career Exploration


    2 credit(s)
    Helps students critically examine and articulate career interests, individual strengths/skills, and work values related to the demands of various professions. Includes opportunities for students to engage in exploration of how their academic work and major areas of study may be aligned with their career plans. Pass/No Pass.
  
  
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    PACU 395 - Independent Study


    See department for details.

Pharmacy

  
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    PHRM 550 - Reflective Practice & Portfolio Development I


    0.5 credit(s)
    This is the first course of three in the series relating to introduction of self-reflection and portfolio development. This course cultivates the cognitive habits necessary for reflective practice, lifelong learning, and personal and professional development. Students will document their curricular, co-curricular, and normal life experiences and use these documents to generate learning, assessment, and/or showcase portfolios in the service of the program’s learning outcomes.


    Students will begin developing methods of demonstrating competency relative to ACPE standards 3 and 4. Pass/No Pass.

  
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    PHRM 556 - Independent Study


    0-6 credit(s)
    See department for details. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 559 - Biochemistry


    5 credit(s)
    Introduces foundational concepts in biochemistry including the principles of protein structure and function, enzyme kinetics, the metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, and lipids, as well as their role in energy production and homeostasis, the transmission of genetic information via DNA replication, transcription, and translation, and the regulatory mechanisms involved in the control of gene expression and DNA repair. Additional highlights of this block include a discussion of recombinant DNA technology, the integration of
    metabolic pathways, the role of membranes and membrane proteins in biological transport, cell signaling, and a brief introduction to the eukaryolic cell cycle and apoptosis. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 562 - Phrm Sci: PD & PK Interface


    2.5 credit(s)
    Emphasizes the physiology and routes of absorption and the important roles of pharacodynamics play in the chemistry of receptors and ligands, pharmacological dose response relations, and molecular basis of drug action.  The interface between pharmacodynamcs and phamacokinetics in the areas of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination is highlighted.  The boloc also provides a brief introduction to pharmeceutics including dosage forms and routes of drug administration.  A few relevant topics are supplemented with clinical correlations. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 563 - Phrm Sci: Central Nervous System I


    2.5 credit(s)
    Addresses concepts and principles of central and peripheral nervous system function, including an introduction to neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and the autonomic nervous system, as related to pathophysiology and symptomatology. This block emphasizes pathophysiology and the pharmacology of drug classes and specific agents used to address major disorders in these systems including schizophrenia, Parkinson’s, seizure, and mood disorders. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 565 - Phrm Sci: Central Nervous System II


    2.5 credit(s)
    Emphasizes pathophysiology and the pharmacology of drug classes and specific agents used to address the disease states of chronic pain, migraine, anxiety, insomnia, Alzheimer’s and ADHD while also discussing the pathophysiologies leading to the separate phenomena of tolerance, dependence, or addiction. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 568 - PCR: Pulmonary, Cardio, Renal I


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block addresses concepts and principles of pulmonary and cardiovascular function, including an introduction to immunology and inflammation, as related to their pathophysiology and symptomatology, and to the pharmacology of drug classes used to address major disorders in these systems.
  
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    PHRM 569 - PCR: Pulmonary, Cardio, Renal II


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block continues to address concepts and principles of cardiovascular and renal function as related to their pathophysiology and symptomatology, and to the pharmacology of drug classes used to address major disorders in these systems.
  
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    PHRM 570 - Chemical Basis of CNS and PCR PK-PD


    2.5 credit(s)
    Describes the chemical basis for the pharmacological action and ADME properties of selected drug classes used for th etreatment of pulmonary, cardiovascular, renal and nervous system disorders.
  
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    PHRM 580 - Phrm Sci: Gastrointestinal and Nutrition


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block reinforces the basic concepts and principles of digestion and absorption as it relates to nutrition. Pathophysiological features associated with hepatic and gastrointestinal dysfunction are introduced, as well the major drug classes and agents used clinically for the treatment of these disorders. An introduction to pharmacognosy, natural products and alternative health care modalities is also included.
  
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    PHRM 581 - Phrm Sci: Endocrine & Sex Hormones


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block emphasizes the role of endocrinology and regulatory hormones in the metabolism of glucose and synthesis of thyroid and sex hormones. In addition, the pathophysiological conditions causing diabetes, thyroid and bone disorders and the mechanisms underlying contraception, infertility, and hormone replacement therapy are discussed. The major drug classes and agents used clinically for the treatment of these conditions are introduced together with pertinent chemical properties/structure-activity relationships and pharmacology including: mechanism of action, routes of administration, adverse effects, key differentiation factors between individual agents, contraindications, and clinically significant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. After this course, students should be able to understand and describe diabetes mellitus, the effects of steroid hormones, the mechanisms of oral contraception and hormone replacement therapy, osteoporosis and osteomalacia, and hypo- and hyperthyroidism.
  
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    PHRM 582 - Phrm Sci: Hematology & Oncology


    2.5 credit(s)
    Introduces students to the mechanisms of hematopolesis and hemostasis as well as the pathophysiology of anemia and bleeding disorders. The major drug classes and agents used clinically for the treatment of these disorders are introduced together with pertinent chemical properties/structure-activity relationships and pharmacology including: mechanism of action, adverse effects, key differentiation factors between individual agents, contraindications, and clinically significant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. In addition, and introduction to cancer biology and classical chemotherapy will be provided.
  
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    PHRM 583 - Phrm Sci: Immunology & Toxicology


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block builds on the basic principles of cellular and molecular immunology taught in PHRM 568. Introduces the pathophysiology of autoimmune diseases, cancer biology and relevant toxicological principles. The major drug classes and agents used for the treatment of immunologic disorders are introduced, along with pertinent structure-activity relationships and pharmacology including mechanism of action, drug action, adverse effeccts, key differentiation factors between individual agents, contraindications, and significant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions. In addition, the pharmacology of classical chemotherapy and select targeted cancer therapy will be introduced.
  
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    PHRM 585 - Phrm Sci: Pharmacokinetics


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block addresses patient- and drug-specific factors that influence therapeutic outcomes. In addition, basic pharmacokinetics concepts are emphasized to develop theories or equations that can be used to predict the optimum dosing interval, predict plasma and tissue concentrations, estimate possible accumulation of drugs or metabolites, explain drug interactions, and predict drug toxicity related to a dosage regimen.
  
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    PHRM 586 - Phrm Sci: Infectious Diseases


    2.5 credit(s)
    This block addresses molecular biology, pharmacologic and medicinal chemistry principles in identification and treatment of infectious diseases. The major drug classes and agents used clinically for the treatment of infectious organisms are introduced together with pertinent chemical properties/structure-activity relationship, and the pharmacology including: mechanism of action, drug action, adverse effects, key differentiation factors between individual agents, contraindications, and clinically significant drug-drug and drug-disease interactions.
  
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    PHRM 588 - Pharmaceutics-Biopharmaceutics


    5.5 credit(s)
    Application of physical and chemical principles involved in the development of pharmaceutical dosage forms and evaluating the role of drug formulation in bioavailability through various routes of administration. In addition, students will develop introductory skills in sterile and non-sterile compounding of various pharmaceutical dosage forms. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 590 - Pharmacy Practice 1


    2.5 credit(s)
    This longitudinal course is the first part of a 4-course sequence in Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Practice 1, Pharmacy Practice 2, Pharmacy Practice 3 and Pharmacy Practice 4. This course will address many aspects of the pharmacy profession’s daily tasks including top 200 drugs, over-the-counter therapies and self-care, pharmacy calculations, blood pressure and heart rate assessment and professional communication. Discussion-based activities and the introduction of clinical cases to strengthen the learning experience will be used along with simulation activities focused within a community pharmacy setting. The course is coordinated with IPPE-prep. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 592 - Pharmacy Practice 2


    3.5 credit(s)
    This longitudinal course is the second part of a 4-course sequence in Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Practice 1, Pharmacy Practice 2, Pharmacy Practice 3 and Pharmacy Practice 4. This course will further assist students in developing skills in the top 200 drugs, over the counter therapies, pharmacy calculations, blood pressure and heart rate assessment, device education, drug information skills and professional communication. Discussion-based activities and clinical cases will be used to strengthen the learning experience along with simulation activities focused on a community pharmacy setting. This course will prepare students for both their introductory community practice and institutional pharmacy practice experience. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 594 - Social & Administrative Sciences 1


    2 credit(s)
    This course is the first of a four semester longitudinal sequence of Social and Administrative Pharmacy. The focus of Social/Administrative Sciences is the scientific and humanistic bases for understanding and influencing interactions involving patients, medicines, caregivers, and health care systems. This integrates knowledge of pharmacy practice with knowledge from areas such as: economics, behavioral science, management science, communication, epidemiology, law, ethics, cultural competency, evidence-based medicine, leadership, informatics, patient safety and quality improvement.
  
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    PHRM 595 - Social & Administrative Sciences 2


    2 credit(s)
    This course is the second of a four semester longitudinal sequence of Social and Administrative Pharmacy. The focus of Social/Administrative Sciences is the scientific and humanistic bases for understanding and influencing interactions involving patients, medicines, caregivers, and health care systems. This integrates knowledge of pharmacy practice with knowledge from areas such as: economics, behavioral science, management science, communication, epidemiology, law, ethics, cultural competency, evidence-based medicine, leadership, informatics, patient safety and quality improvement.
  
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    PHRM 596 - IPPE Preparation


    2 credit(s)
    During this longitudinal course students will learn essential skills in preparation for their first Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) in the Spring. Skills to be covered include counseling patients, over-the-counter therapies and self-care, communication with healthcare providers, drug information skills, professionalism, etc. As part of a service learning activity, students will also spend time at a Long Term Care facility interacting with residents. The course content is coordinated with Pharmacy Practice 1.
  
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    PHRM 597 - IPPE 1 Community


    2 credit(s)
    Experiential course in which students spend time at a community pharmacy site. Emphasis is placed on integration of didactic and experiantial curricula in the form of IPPE workbook assignments, orientation to pharmacy practice including patient and healthcare provider interactions, medication processing systems, and learning roles of all members of the community pharmacy team. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 641 - Clinical Sci: Intro Patient-Center Care


    2.5 credit(s)
    An integrated study of knowledge gained from second-year pre-requisites with skills obtained during IPPE courses, and applications to patient-centered pharmacy care including: using and evaluating the medical chart, understanding common laboratory values and continuing to build on drug information, drug literature evaluation skills, and principles of medication safety. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 642 - Clinical Sci: Cardiovascular I


    2 credit(s)
    Application of chronic cardiovascular disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 643 - Clinical Sci: Neurological & Psych I


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of psychiatric and neurologic disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 644 - Clinical Sci: Neurological & Psych II


    2.5 credit(s)
    Applications of pain management, substance dependence, and neurologic disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 645 - Clinical Sci: Renal


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of renal disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, medication use in renal impairment, and review of related drug literature. Topical areas include: acute and chronic kidney disease and associated disease states, drug-induced renal injury, fluid and electrolyte management, and acid-base disorders. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 646 - Clinical Sci: Endocrine


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of endocrine disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 647 - Clinical Sci: Sexual & Reproduct Health


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of pharmacotherapy of common sexual and reproductive health issues/disorders related to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 648 - Clinical Sci: Gastrointestinal


    2.5 credit(s)
    Introduction to the application of gastrointestinal and hepatic disorder pharmacotherapy to patient care, through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomics, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature. Also includes an introduction to nutritional therapy (parenteral and enteral).
  
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    PHRM 650 - Reflective Practice & Portfolio Development II


    0.5 credit(s)
    This is the second course of three in the series relating to introduction of self-reflection and portfolio development. Students will continue to cultivate the cognitive habits necessary for reflective practice, lifelong learning, and personal and professional development. Students will document their curricular, co-curricular, and normal life experiences and use these documents to generate learning, assessment, and/or showcase portfolios in the service of the program’s learning outcomes.

    Students will continue developing methods of demonstrating competency relative to ACPE standards 3 and 4. Pass/No Pass.

  
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    PHRM 656 - Independent Study


    0-12 credit(s)
    See department for details.
  
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    PHRM 680 - Clinical Science: Immunology


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of immunologic, dermatologic, and ophthalmologic pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complementary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 681 - Clinical Sci: Infectious Diseases I


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of basic infectious diseases pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 682 - Clinical Sci: Infectious Diseases II


    2.5 credit(s)
    Building on the skills gained in the first infectious diseases pharmacotherapy block, application of antimicrobial/antifungal pharmacotherapy, to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 683 - Clinical Sci: Pulmonology


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of pulmonary pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 684 - Clinical Sci: Critical Care


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of pharmacotherapy of critical illness to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutis, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 685 - Clinical Sci: Hematology & Oncology


    2.5 credit(s)
    Application of hematologic and oncologic pharmacotherapy to patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 686 - Clinical Sci: Infectious Diseases III


    2.5 credit(s)
    Building on the skills gained in the second infectious diseases/pharmacotherapy block, application of antimicrobial, antifungal, and antiviral pharmacotherapy to infectious diseases occurring in the immunocompromised host and viral illnesses through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 687 - Clinical Sci: Cardiovascular II


    2.5 credit(s)
    Building on the skills gained in the first cardiovascular diseases pharmacotherapy block, application of cardiovascular pharmacotherapy to acute and chronic patient care through an integrated study of pathophysiology, physical assessment, pharmacology, pharmacotherapeutics, pharmacokinetics, alternative/complimentary therapies, pharmacoeconomic issues, medication use in special populations, and a review of related drug literature.
  
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    PHRM 690 - Pharmacy Practice 3


    3.5 credit(s)
    This longitudinal course is the third part of a 4-course sequence in Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Practice 1, Pharmacy Practice 2, Pharmacy Practice 3 and Pharmacy Practice 4. This sequence builds upon the previous courses, while focusing on reinforcement and application of knowledge and skills gained during the parallel second professional year (P2) clinical and social and administrative sciences courses/blocks. Skills from prior pharmacy practice courses will be revisited along with developing skills in patient interview, navigating the electronic medical record, documenting patient care activities, and literature evaluation. Discussion-based activities and clinical cases will be used to strengthen the learning experience along with simulation activities focused in an ambulatory care pharmacy setting. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 692 - Pharmacy Practice 4


    4.5 credit(s)
    This longitudinal course is the fourth part of a 4-course sequence in Pharmacy Practice: Pharmacy Practice 1, Pharmacy Practice 2, Pharmacy Practice 3 and Pharmacy Practice 4. This sequence builds upon the previous courses, while focusing on reinforcement and application of knowledge and skills gained during the parallel second professional year (P2) clinical and social and administrative sciences courses/blocks. Skills from prior pharmacy practice courses will be revisited along with developing skills in patient presentation, documenting patient care activities, and literature evaluation. Discussion-based activities and clinical cases will be used to strengthen the learning experience, along with simulation activities focused on inpatient and health-system pharmacy settings Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 694 - Social & Administrative Sciences 3


    2 credit(s)
    This course is a continuation of the four semester longitudinal sequence of Social and Administrative Pharmacy. The focus of Social/Administrative Sciences is the scientific and humanistic bases for understanding and influencing interactions involving patients, medicines, caregivers, and health care systems. This integrates knowledge of pharmacy practice with knowledge from areas such as: economics, behavioral science, management science, communication, epidemiology, law, ethics, cultural competency, evidence-based medicine, leadership, informatics, patient safety and quality improvement.
  
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    PHRM 695 - Social & Administrative Sciences 4


    2 credit(s)
    This course is the summation of a four semester longitudinal sequence of Social and Administrative Pharmacy. The focus of Social/Administrative Sciences is the scientific and humanistic bases for understanding and influencing interactions involving patients, medicines, caregivers, and health care systems. This integrates knowledge of pharmacy practice with knowledge from areas such as: economics, behavioral science, management science, communication, epidemiology, law, ethics, cultural competency, evidence-based medicine, leadership, informatics, patient safety and quality improvement.
  
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    PHRM 696 - IPPE 2 Community


    3 credit(s)
    Experiential block in which students spend additional time at a community pharmacy site. Emphasis is placed on integration of didactic and experiential curricula in the form of workbook activities and self-reflections. The intent of this course is meant to reinforce and build upon skills learned in the P1 curricula from pharmacy practice courses, social and administrative sciences and previous IPPE experiences Highlights include patient and healthcare provider communication, medication processing systems, and learning healthcare provider roles. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 697 - IPPE 3 Health System


    6 credit(s)
    In this experiential block which occurs daily, students spend time at a health systems pharmacy site. Emphasis is placed on integration of didactic and experiential curricula in the form of Learning Bridge assignments, orientation to pharmacy practice including patient and healthcare provider interactions, medication processing systems, and learning healthcare provider roles. Pass/No Pass.
  
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    PHRM 698 - IPPE 4 Community


    2 credit(s)
    In this experiential block which occurs every other Tuesday, students spend additional time at a community pharmacy site. Emphasis is placed on integration of didactic and experiential curricula in the form of Learning Bridge assignments, orientation to pharmacy practice including patient and healthcare provider interactions, medication processing systems, and learning healthcare provider roles. The intent of this course is to build on the skills learned in previous IPPE community experiences.
  
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    PHRM 699 - APPE Preparation


    2 credit(s)
    Clinical application of skills and knowledge developed in the classroom to an assigned pharmacy setting within the classroom. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills necessary to prepare students for Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences (APPEs). These include professionalism, communication, patient consultation, patient information gathering, self-care, drug information, and disease state management.
  
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    PHRM 701 - APPE: Advanced Community Pharmacy


    6 credit(s)
    The advanced community rotation affords students the opportunity to effectively participate in the patient care decision-making process. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to demonstrate their understanding of common disease states and treatment modalities as well as their ability to provide pharmaceutical care. Emphasis will be placed on disease state management initiatives.
  
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    PHRM 702 - APPE: Health System Pharmacy


    6 credit(s)
    The purpose of this rotation is for students to gain professional skills in a health system pharmacy setting. The health system pharmacy rotation affords students the opportunity to effectively participate in the patient care decision-making process. Students will participate in a variety of clinical activities, functioning as an integral member of the healthcare team. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to demonstrate their understanding of functional roles of health system pharmacy in providing consistent quality patient care.
  
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    PHRM 703 - APPE: Ambulatory Care


    6 credit(s)
    The purpose of this rotation is for students to gain professional skills in an ambulatory care practice environment. The Ambulatory Care rotation affords students the opportunity to effectively participate in the patient care decision-making process. Students will participate in a variety of clinical activities, functioning as an integral member of the healthcare team. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to demonstrate their understanding of common disease states and treatment modalities as well as their ability to provide pharmaceutical care.
  
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    PHRM 704 - APPE: Internal General Medicine


    6 credit(s)
    The purpose of this rotation is for students to gain professional skills in an Internal General Medicine setting. The Internal General Medicine rotation affords students the opportunity to effectively participate in the patient care decision-making process. Students will participate in a variety of clinical activities, functioning as an integral member of the healthcare team. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to demonstrate their understanding of internal general medicine and their ability to provide pharmaceutical care.
  
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    PHRM 705 - APPE: Patient Care Elective


    6 credit(s)
    The experience may occur in any setting where the student would be providing pharmaceutical care to patients. Examples of Patient Care electives include: Advanced Community, Cardiology, Critical Care, Hematology/Oncology, Home Infusion, HIV/AIDS, Infectious Disease, Long Term Care, Nutrition, Pediatrics, Solid Organ Transplant, and Trauma Surgery.
  
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    PHRM 706 - APPE: Patient/Non-Patient Care Elect A


    6 credit(s)
    Elective clerkships can be performed in non patient-care environments. Examples of Elective clerkships include: Compounding, Drug Information, Drug Use Policy, Managed Care, Pharmacy Education, Pharmaceutical Industry, Pharmacy Management, Professional Organizations and Pharmacy Leadership, or Research. Elective clerkships could also encompass any Advanced Community, Ambulatory, Internal Medicine or other patient care elective.
  
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    PHRM 707 - APPE: Patient/Non-Patient Care Elect B


    6 credit(s)
    Elective clerkships can be performed in non patient-care environments. Examples of Elective clerkships include: Compounding, Drug Information, Drug Use Policy, Managed Care, Pharmacy Education, Pharmaceutical Industry, Pharmacy Management, Professional Organizations and Pharmacy Leadership, or Research. Elective clerkships could also encompass any Advanced Community, Ambulatory, Internal Medicine or other patient care elective.
  
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    PHRM 709 - Comprehensive Curricular Review


    1 credit(s)
    This block provides a quick and comprehensive review of important concepts students have learned during the past three years. The comprehensive curricular review assists students in identifying strengths and weaknesses in areas that need attention and focus. This block is designed to inform students of different graduation activities and ceremonies, including a few program assessment activities. Students will receive information related to the completion of all requirements for graduation and their new role as an alumnus.
  
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    PHRM 711 - Self-Study APPE: Review/Experiences


    6 credit(s)
    Students have one of three options: 1.) Self-study review of NAPLEX/MPJE, 2.) International Experience, or 3.) Additional Patient/Non-Patient Care Elective APPE.
  
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    PHRM 713 - APPE: Research Experience


    6 credit(s)
    Aims to provide students with the opportunity to acquire skills and concepts inherent in both theoretical and experimental aspects of pharmaceutical research. Students will be trained in problem solving, critical thinking, writing skills, and research design (ACPE 2016 standards, CAPE outcomes) and experience 1:1 mentorship with faculty. Pass/No Pass.
    Prerequisite(s): PHRM 758 
  
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    PHRM 750 - Hot Topics in Infectious Diseases


    1 credit(s)
    This elective course provides students with opportunity to discuss Infectious Disease ethical dilemmas that occur in clinical practice and explore options for future experiences. Current news stories are discussed, including outbreaks of infectious diseases, world events, and new developments or discoveries. This course will require a group presentation, class participation in lecture and debates, and reflection writing.
 

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